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BAMcinemaFest Review: ‘The Hottest August’ is an Expressive, Expansive Portrait of Summer in NYC

Where better than New York City to make a structuralist film? Cities are iterative, their street grids diagrams of theme and variation, and New York most of all—with its streets and avenues named for numbers and letters and states and cities and presidents and Revolutionary War generals spanning an archipelago, intersecting at a million little data points at which to measure class, race, culture, history, architecture and infrastructure. And time, too—from this human density emerge daily and seasonal rituals, a set of biorhythms, reliable as the earth’s, against which to mark gradual shifts and momentary fashions. Summer is for lounging on fire escapes, always, and, today, for Mister Softee. Yesterday it was shaved ice. Tomorrow, who knows?

In The Hottest August, Brett Story, the cultural geographer who made The Prison in Twelve Landscapes, attempts something a little like Akerman’s News from Home, schlepping a camera across
See full article at The Film Stage »

Actors playing nightmarish versions of themselves in cinema – ranked!

Keanu Reeves’s cameo in Netflix’s Always Be My Maybe – as himself, yet absolutely ghastly – is a showstopper. But what about those other stars who have parodied themselves on screen?

The collision of high and low culture that occurred when Al Pacino appeared as himself in Adam Sandler’s lamentable cross-dressing comedy must have been visible from space. Pacino falls in love with Sandler in drag but the sorest indignity comes when he rechristens himself Dunkaccino to star in a Dunkin’ Donuts commercial in which he raps mangled lines from Dog Day Afternoon, The Godfather Part II and Scarface (“Say hello to my chocolate blend”).
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

New Trailer For ‘The Captor’ With Ethan Hawke, Noomi Rapace & Mark Strong

Signature Entertainment

We’ve just received a brand new trailer for the upcoming The Captor, a new film starring Ethan Hawke, Noomi Rapace and Mark Strong. The film comes to cinemas and on-demand from 21st June. We’re hearing that this one is reminiscent of films like Dog Day Afternoon and Inside Man, so we’re quite looking forward to checking it all out in the summer.

This stylish, faced-paced, fun and frantic crime caper is a vibrant blend of tension, humour and history. Based on the absurd but true story of a 1973 bank heist and hostage crisis, The Captor, described as ‘a suspenseful, riotous black comedy’, is an extraordinary account of what happens when hostages bond with their captors and turn against the authorities – a phenomenon now identified as the Stockholm syndrome.

Writer and director Robert Budreau has assembled a top-notch cast for this intriguing and unique thriller: he
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Ava DuVernay Joins TCM to Discuss 'The Essentials'

Ava DuVernay Joins TCM to Discuss 'The Essentials'
Oscar-nominated filmmaker Ava DuVernay is joining Ben Mankiewicz for the latest round of The Essentials on Saturday nights on Turner Classic Movies.

The director behind such films as Selma (2014), 13th (2016) and A Wrinkle in Time (2018) will sit down with the TCM primetime host to introduce a hand-picked movie and offer commentary on its cultural significance, its influence on other films, behind-the-scenes stories and personal reflections.

The new season premieres May 4 at 5 p.m. Pt with a screening of best picture winner Marty (1955), starring Ernest Borgnine. Cabin in the Sky (1943), West Side Story (1961), Dog Day Afternoon (1975), La Pointe Courte (1955),...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

‘Stockholm’ Review: Ethan Hawke Robs a Bank and Coins a Syndrome in a Quirky Heist Comedy that Doesn’t Pay Off

On August 23, 1973, a convict by the name of Jan-Erik Olsson tried to rob the largest bank in Stockholm while he was on leave from his stint in prison. Olsson carried a machine gun, and he took a few hostages, but he wasn’t a jerk about it or anything; he was reasonably kind to the bank tellers, he only hurt people by accident, and — as the day wore on — he even started singing Roberta Flack in the vault (the acoustics down there must have been fantastic).

Either charmed by her captor, or simply convinced that he was harmless, one of Olsson’s hostages spoke up for him over the phone when the Prime Minister of Sweden called to negotiate; several others raised money for his legal defense when the standoff was over. It was almost as if the trauma of the whole event had caused its victims to sympathize with their assailant.
See full article at Indiewire »

Emilio Estevez Left Studio Films for Indies: ‘My Accountant Curses that Choice — Still’

  • Indiewire
Emilio Estevez Left Studio Films for Indies: ‘My Accountant Curses that Choice — Still’
Emilio Estevez puts his money where his mouth is: More than two decades ago, after headlining some of the most era-defining youth-culture hits of the 1980s — “The Outsiders,” “The Breakfast Club,” “St. Elmo’s Fire” — he left the studios behind and rebranded himself an independent filmmaker.

“My accountant curses that choice — still,” Estevez said. “Like, ‘How we gonna? … You’re 20 years in arrears.’ He doesn’t really sound like that, but it sounds like that to me. I finally just said, ‘I’m not gonna participate in the types of films other people want me to make. I’m gonna make films that matter to me.’” Estevez even went so far as to self-distribute his last movie, “The Way,” starring his father Martin Sheen as a man who walks Spain’s famed pilgrim’s trail, the Camino de Santiago.

Nor is his latest movie, “The Public,” opening April 5 in a
See full article at Indiewire »

"Fight the Powers That Be": Race and Capital in Spike Lee’s "Do the Right Thing" and "Inside Man"

  • MUBI
Spike Lee's Inside Man (2006) and Do the Right Thing (1989) are showing on Mubi in many countries around the world in January and February, 2019.Forty-five minutes into Spike Lee’s 2006 Inside Man, Clive Owen’s mysterious bank robber Dalton Russell negotiates with Denzel Washington’s detective Keith Frazier a food delivery for the 50 or so people he’s holding hostage inside the fictional Wall Street-headquartered Manhattan Trust Bank. The food smuggled through the horde of cops surrounding the building is pizza, and the boxes the slices come in read: Sal’s Famous Pizzeria. I wish I could say I spotted the intertextual connection right away, but it took Lee’s DVD commentary to illuminate the link between his 2006 star-studded thriller and the family-owned Bedford-Stuyvesant restaurant that staged his 1989 Do the Right Thing. “Sal’s pizzeria,” Lee comments, somewhat sarcastically, “burned down in Brooklyn, and moved to Wall Street.”Revisiting the
See full article at MUBI »

‘Give Me Liberty’ Review: Real-Time Dark Comedy Is Overwhelming in a Good Way — Sundance

‘Give Me Liberty’ Review: Real-Time Dark Comedy Is Overwhelming in a Good Way — Sundance
In the pantheon of movies set within the constraints of a single, hectic day — from “Dog Day Afternoon” to “Dazed and Confused” — “Give Me Liberty” earns points for cramming its plot with new twists every step of the way. The plight of young Russian-American Vic (newcomer Chris Galust) as he speeds around Milwaukee in a handicapped transport and juggles a series of setbacks unfolds through a series of complications that collapse into chaos every few minutes. But even as that process grows exhausting across two packed hours, it’s a dizzying blast to watch Vic’s day fall apart again and again, as he struggles to mine meaning from the chaos.

Director Kirill Mikhanovsky’s sophomore effort is a breathless dark comedy that takes occasional tragic and bittersweet detours as it maps out the soft-spoken Vic’s hectic world. It doesn’t take long for Vic’s journey to become an overwhelming,
See full article at Indiewire »

Al Pacino Near Deal to Star in Drama Series ‘The Hunt’ at Amazon

  • Variety
Al Pacino Near Deal to Star in Drama Series ‘The Hunt’ at Amazon
Al Pacino is close to closing a deal to star in the upcoming drama series “The Hunt” at Amazon, Variety has confirmed with sources.

Should the deal close, it would mark Pacino’s first regular television role in his long and storied career. Amazon declined to comment.

Pacino has previously starred in the TV miniseries “Angels in America” and “The Godfather Saga.” He is known for his roles in iconic films like “The Godfather” franchise, “Serpico,” “Dog Day Afternoon,” and “Scent of a Woman.” In recent years, he has also starred in a number of HBO films like “You Don’t Know Jack” as Jack Kevorkian, “Phil Spector,” and “Paterno.”

He is repped by CAA.

The Hunt” follows a diverse band of Nazi Hunters living in 1977 New York City. They have discovered that hundreds of high ranking Nazi officials are living among us and conspiring to create a Fourth Reich in the Us.
See full article at Variety »

Bill Hader’s Winding Road From Stefon to the Dark Laughs of ‘Barry’

  • Variety
Bill Hader’s Winding Road From Stefon to the Dark Laughs of ‘Barry’
If not for “Up All Night With Rhonda Shear,” there would be no “Barry.” A linear precursor to binge viewing, USA’s horror-movie schlock block, which ran from late evening to early morning in the 1990s, attracted no small number of teens who had nothing better to do on a Friday or Saturday night. Bill Hader was one of them.

At 15, sitting in his parents’ house in Tulsa, Okla., the future “Saturday Night Live” comic and Golden Globe nominee was watching “Up All Night” when, at 2 a.m., “The Evil Dead” came on. The cinematic power of Sam Raimi running really fast after actors through heavy vegetation inspired him.

“The next day I got my dad’s video camera and started chasing my sisters around like those shots in ‘The Evil Dead,’” Hader says. It was the first time he picked up a camera. “It was like you’re listening to Rush,
See full article at Variety »

How ‘Destroyer’ Director Karyn Kusama Deconstructed The Noir Genre & Rebuilt It From A Woman’s Point Of View

  • Deadline
In the golden renaissance of television, the prevailing wisdom is that HBO’s The Sopranos and AMC’s Breaking Bad put the crime noir genre out of business on the big screen. But with Destroyer, director Karyn Kusama and screenwriters Phil Hay and Matt Manfredi prove that there are still a few 180-degree tales left. What sets this noir apart from such classics as Chinatown and L.A. Confidential is that it’s from the viewpoint of a complex, battered undercover female cop on the hunt, embodied by Nicole Kidman in one of her most chameleonic turns since her Oscar-winning portrayal of Virginia Woolf in The Hours. Annapurna Pictures opened the 30West/Automatik production yesterday at three theaters in New York and Los Angeles. Kidman is nominated for a Golden Globe in the best actress drama category.

How long did Phil Hay and Matt Manfredi work on the script?

All of
See full article at Deadline »

‘Private Life’ Star Kathryn Hahn on Her Onscreen Chemistry With Paul Giamatti: ‘A Soupy Mystery’

  • The Wrap
‘Private Life’ Star Kathryn Hahn on Her Onscreen Chemistry With Paul Giamatti: ‘A Soupy Mystery’
A version of this article about Kathryn Hahn first appeared in the Actors/Director/Screenwriters issue of TheWrap’s Oscar magazine.

While making “Private Life,” director Tamara Jenkins and actors Kathryn Hahn and Paul Giamatti talked about “Waiting for Godot,” “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” and “Dog Day Afternoon” — but you’d have to know what to look for to find echoes of those projects in Jenkins’ rich family story. The tale of a New York theater couple in their 40s trying desperately to overcome infertility issues and have a baby, the film is both comic and wrenching. Hahn and Giamatti are quietly gripping as a couple whose relationship is tested with each failed procedure.

“I loved the specificity of Tamara’s writing and the absolutely perfect human comedy of this marriage,” said Hahn, who suggests years of hurt behind each smile. “I had such deep and complete empathy
See full article at The Wrap »

Spike Lee Wants a Nomination, But He’s Keeping Oscar History in Perspective

Spike Lee Wants a Nomination, But He’s Keeping Oscar History in Perspective
The commercial and critical success of his “BlacKkKlansman” has given Spike Lee his first legit awards contender in years. And with four Golden Globe nominations this week, including nods for Best Director and Best Picture, it’s not an opportunity he’s taking for granted. In the midst of his always-busy schedule, Lee has made time to introduce the film at screenings, do interviews, and meet Academy voters.

“I’m doing the thing, meeting the voters and kissing babies,” said Lee when he was a guest on IndieWire’s Filmmaker Toolkit podcast. “This is what everybody has told me, this is what you have to do.”

While Lee, who has never received a Best Director nomination from the Academy or the DGA, said it’s natural for anyone to want to be recognized for their work, he is more focused on making sure his long-time collaborators like composer Terence Blanchard
See full article at Indiewire »

Will ‘Roma’ win over L.A. film critics like it did in New York?

Will ‘Roma’ win over L.A. film critics like it did in New York?
Historically, the West coast critics have feted different films and performances than those that merited mention by the Gotham crowd. For example, last year the New York Film Critics Circle (Nyfcc) embraced “Lady Bird” while the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn. loved “Call Me By Your Name.” But we think the two groups will align this year.

The big winner with the New Yorkers was “Roma,” which won Best Picture as well as both director and cinematography for Alfonso Cuaron. We are predicting that his intimate film will do as well with the L.A. crowd on Sunday winning Best Picture, Director and Actress (Yalitza Aparicio). See the complete list of odds for the Lafca Awards.

While we should certainly pay attention to the choices of the West Coast based scribes, we need to remember that over the course of its 43-year history, Lafca has predicted only nine winners of the Best Picture Oscar.
See full article at Gold Derby »

This Year’s Best Picture Hopefuls Offer Fresh Takes on Eternal Issues

  • Variety
This Year’s Best Picture Hopefuls Offer Fresh Takes on Eternal Issues
One of the main reasons movies resonate with us is that they make us think: about our own lives, our history or our appreciation for past pieces of art. So many of this year’s awards contenders do one or all of the above, be it a flashy musical that yanks at memories from our childhood like “Mary Poppins Returns” or period dramas like “Green Book” and “If Beale Street Could Talk” that takes on race relations and reminds us that we haven’t evolved as far past the Jim Crow era as we’d like to think. We’ve rounded up a list of films that will most likely bring up these sensations – for better or for worse – with awards season voters.

A Star Is Born

Every generation nose this story

Since its inception, Hollywood’s delicate eco-system has maintained its balance by cheering talent on the rise while
See full article at Variety »

Horror Highlights: Welcome To Daisyland, Blood Paradise, Nefarious, The House That Never Dies: Reawakening

Entry to Daisyland isn't open until next year on BlackBoxTV, but you can still enjoy a ride or two while watching the teaser trailer that dropped online. Also in today's Horror Highlights: Blood Paradise acquisition news, production details for Nefarious, and The House That Never Dies: Reawakening digital and DVD release details.

Welcome to Daisyland Release Details: "The teaser trailer for the highly anticipated horror anthology series Welcome To Daisyland premiered today on BlackBoxTV, a YouTube channel dedicated to short horror films and series.

The brand new anthology horror anthology series will be launched on 1.1.19. and Directed by award-winning filmmaker Tony E. Valenzuela and soundtrack will feature music from hard rock band The Dead Daisies.

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Artsploitation Films Acquires North American Rights to Blood Paradise: Press Release: "Aspect Ratio today announces the sale of Blood Paradise, the Swedish horror-comedy from producer-director provocateurs Andréa Winter and Patrick von Barkenberg, to Artsploitation Films.
See full article at DailyDead »

Spike Lee delivers David Lean lecture at BAFTAs: ‘BlacKkKlansman’ is not just a peculiarity of America, this stuff is global

Spike Lee delivers David Lean lecture at BAFTAs: ‘BlacKkKlansman’ is not just a peculiarity of America, this stuff is global
Spike Lee took to the stage at 194 Piccadilly in London to deliver BAFTA’s annual David Lean lecture. Previous speakers have included Paul Greengrass, Robert Altman, Peter Weir, Oliver Stone and David Lynch – but none of those filmmakers was as outspoken in their lecture as Lee.

In a lively 90-minute talk, which concluded with a Q&A, Lee addressed a wide range of topics from the Oscars to Donald Trump to his new movie “BlacKkKlansman.” In between, he played various clips from both his own films – including “Malcolm X” and “25th Hour” – as well as classics by others, such as David Lean’s “The Bridge on the River Kwai.”

Lee wasn’t afraid to ruffle feathers during his lecture, first discussing the treatment of black people in Hollywood and in cinema following a clip from his 2000 movie “Bamboozled.” As he observed, “This movie is about demonization and degradation of black people.
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘BlacKkKlansman’ Production Crew Helps Spike Lee Re-Create the 1970s

  • Variety
‘BlacKkKlansman’ Production Crew Helps Spike Lee Re-Create the 1970s
Spike Lee, who co-wrote and directed Focus Features’ “BlacKkKlansman,” says it was not an easy movie to make, but that everybody worked together. “We were all making the same film,” he explains, “which doesn’t always happen.”

The fact-based story centers on Ron Stallworth, a black cop who went undercover in Colorado Springs in the 1970s to expose local Ku Klux Klan activities. Lee pays tribute to some of his below-the-line colleagues as well as to such respected performers as Harry Belafonte, who co-stars in the film.

Barry Alexander Brown, Editor

“He’s cut almost everything for me; we go way, way back. For the sequence involving Mr. Belafonte, who brings such weight and gravitas — he was in the trenches with Dr. King — Kevin [Willmott, a co-writer] and I wanted him to talk about a real-life incident of lynching, which is the legacy of the Ku Klux Klan. There was an incident in Waco,
See full article at Variety »

Oscar Flashback: The three films that swept the Big Five, including ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,’ ‘The Silence of the Lambs’

Oscar Flashback: The three films that swept the Big Five, including ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,’ ‘The Silence of the Lambs’
This article marks Part 6, the final entry in the Gold Derby series reflecting on films that contended for the Big Five Oscars – Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Screenplay (Original or Adapted). With “A Star Is Born” this year on the cusp of joining this exclusive group of Oscar favorites, join us as we look back at the 43 extraordinary pictures that earned Academy Awards nominations in each of the Big Five categories, including the following three films that swept all of the top races.

At the 7th Academy Awards ceremony, Frank Capra’s romantic comedy “It Happened One Night” (1934) made Oscar history as the first film to triumph in all of the Big Five categories – Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor (Clark Gable), Best Actress (Claudette Colbert) and Best Adapted Screenplay (Robert Riskin). For each of these talents, it would hardly be their lone Oscar appearance.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Mipcom 2018: Digital Buyers, Drama & Consolidation Chat Dominate Cannes As Star-Studded TV Fest Comes To A Close

  • Deadline
Mipcom 2018: Digital Buyers, Drama & Consolidation Chat Dominate Cannes As Star-Studded TV Fest Comes To A Close
There was certainly a buzz in the air at this week’s Mipcom. The market felt genuinely busy and a raft of A-list talent such as Ben Stiller, Issa Rae and Jenna Coleman gave it a spark of glamor. Some 13,800 delegates, including 4,800 buyers from 110 countries attended the international television market, which was dominated by chatter about the growth of digital buyers and the “never-ending” drama boom as well as concerns over what media consolidation means for the global market (as well as traditional complaints about the rain and the airport-style security).

Endeavor boss Ari Emanuel talked up his plans to acquire more content companies, Insecure star Rae discussed the importance of diverse storytellers, while joking that even “white people are tired of seeing white-people shows” and Facebook made a splash with the news that it was rebooting The Real World online.

NBC Universal was conspicuous in Cannes thanks to its
See full article at Deadline »
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