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Voyage of the Damned (1976) Poster

Trivia

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Katherine Ross won a Golden Globe for a two scene role.
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At one point, Yugoslavia was considered as a shooting location. Yugoslav producers managed to find locations to represent both Hamburg and Havana (the town of Rijeka and resort of Opatija on the northern Croatian Adriatic coast, just a few kilometers apart), but couldn't find the ship US producers wanted (they did find one, but it was in the process of being destroyed in a harbor), so the idea was abandoned.
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Denholm Eliott has only 6 lines in a one scene role.
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Jon Voight turned down the Malcolm McDowell part.
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The film cast includes five Oscar winners: Faye Dunaway, Lee Grant, Wendy Hiller, José Ferrer and Orson Welles; and seven Oscar nominees: Oskar Werner, Max von Sydow, Katharine Ross, James Mason, Denholm Elliott, Julie Harris and Janet Suzman.
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Jack Warden filmed a major cameo that ended up being removed from all versions of the film.
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Many people believed that Lynne Frederick was going to receive an Oscar nomination for her performance in this film. Instead, her co-star Lee Grant got the nomination. When Grant received the nomination, Frederick personally sent her flowers along with a congratulatory note. Although Grant ultimately didn't win, Frederick was very supportive of Grant and publicly campaigned for her to win.
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This was Oskar Werner's final film before his death on October 23, 1984 at the age of 61.
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Maria Charles, Robert Brown and Ben Aris all ended up on the cutting room floor.
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The only film that year nominated for Best Motion Picture Drama at the Golden Globes, and not Best Picture at the Academy Awards.
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Jonathan Pryce receives an 'introducing' credit.
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Closing credits epilogue: Two months after the St. Louis docked at Antwerp-World War II began.

Of 937 passengers, over 600 died in Nazi concentration camps.

The S.S. ST. LOUIS was destroyed by allied bombs in Hamburg, 1944.

This film is based upon a true incident. Some of the names, occupations and experiences of those involved have been altered to protect the privacy of the survivors and their families.
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The ship used in the film was the M/V" Irpinia" from the Italian" Grimaldi Siosa" Line. Originally a French liner It was built in France in 1929 as the Steam Turbine ship "Campana". In 1955 she was Aquired by the Grimaldi Siosa line after being berthed in Buenos Aires Argentina during the Armistice between France and Nazi Germany in 1940. From 1943 until returned to her original owners in 1946, she served the Argentinian Government running between Buenos Aires and New York as the "Rio Jachal". In 1962 she underwent a transformation to a single funnel design and became a M/V with the addition of two Fiat Diesel engines. The aging vessel was scheduled to be retired in 1976, but was rented by the production company as she was still well appointed and running on the Mediterranean cruise routes. In. She sailed for a few more years after the movie, and unable to obtain a certificate of seaworthiness in Italy, she was sold to ship breakers in La Spezia, Italy. She Languished there for two years before finally being broken up. A sad end to a lovely lady.
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Orson Welles has 4 scenes.
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James Mason has 4 scenes and 17 lines.
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Jose Ferrer has two scenes.
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For her role, Lynne Frederick cut her long hair to make her character look more of the film's time period.
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Oskar Werner and José Ferrer previously appeared in another similar themed film about a ship voyage during wartime in Ship of Fools (1965).
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This was Lynne Frederick's third historical film. Although this one was slightly different from her previous ones, as she was not portraying a real person, but instead a fictitious character in a real historical setting.
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Ben Aris was cut out of this film. However, he can be spotted in one shot when Ben Gazzara and Bernard Hepton are having a meeting on the ship with the passengers.
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Fernando Rey only has 1 scene.
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A few actors from this movie - Philip Stone, James Mason, Malcolm McDowell and Leonard Rossiter - had appeared in many of Stanley Kubrick films.
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James Mason and Denholm Elliott later appeared in The Boys from Brazil (1978).
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Many PR handouts on the micro-jacket of Robert Brown at the BFI National Library say he is in this film, but he cannot be seen in the final print.
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A huge money-loser, this film was not released in Britain, where it was mostly made, for virtually a year after its American opening. It was further cut from 155 minutes to 137 minutes, with Janet Suzman's role deleted entirely, although her name still remained prominently displayed in the opening credits.
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Wendy Hiller and Orson Welles previously appeared in A Man for All Seasons (1966).
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Faye Dunaway and Max von Sydow previously starred in Three Days of the Condor (1975).
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Max von Sydow, José Ferrer, Denholm Elliott all appeared in at least one film directed by Woody Allen during the 1980's.
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One of two movies from 1976 that featured Ben Gazarra and the song "I Can't Give You Anything But Love"; the other being The Killing of a Chinese Bookie.
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

Whilst this film was based on a true incident, the fate of the passengers of the S.S. St. Louis is not completely accurate. Whilst in the movie only two passengers are allowed to disembark in Cuba, in reality 29 were allowed to. In addition, whilst the film tells viewers that, in the end, over 600 of the 937 passengers died during the war or in concentration camps, historians actually estimate that most of the passengers survived the war and camps, with about 200 killed and about 700 survivors.
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Body count 4.
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