Starting Over (1979) - News Poster

(1979)

News

HBO Max Grabs Soderbergh's Let Them All Talk Starring Meryl Streep & Candice Bergen

Adding to its roster of premium curated content from leading industry powerhouses, HBO Max has picked up Let Them All Talk (working title), an original film directed by Oscar and Emmy award winner Steven Soderbergh and written by MacArthur Fellow and Pen / Faulkner award-winning author Deborah Eisenberg.

With a legendary cast including Oscar, Emmy, and Golden Globe award winner Meryl Streep, Emmy award winner and Oscar nominee Candice Bergen, Oscar, Emmy, and Golden Globe award winner Dianne Wiest, Oscar and Golden Globe award nominee Lucas Hedges and SAG Award nominee Gemma Chan. Let Them All Talk tells the story of a celebrated author (Streep) who takes a journey with some old friends (Bergen and Wiest) to have some fun and heal old wounds. Her nephew (Hedges) comes along to wrangle the ladies and finds himself involved with a young literary agent (Chan).

"This is the kind of project where you
See full article at MovieWeb »

In Memoriam 2018: Gallery of 30 celebrity deaths includes Penny Marshall, Stan Lee, Burt Reynolds, Aretha Franklin

In Memoriam 2018: Gallery of 30 celebrity deaths includes Penny Marshall, Stan Lee, Burt Reynolds, Aretha Franklin
With 2018 now ending, Gold Derby celebrates over 30 celebrities who died in the past 12 months. Tour our photo gallery above as we feature tributes to these entertainer losses from this past year.

Just a few of the people honored in our special photo gallery:

Actress and director Penny Marshall died December 17 at age 75. She became one of the biggest stars on TV in the 1970s and early 1980s with “Laverne and Shirley.” She then directed such blockbuster films as “Big,” “A League of Their Own” and “Awakenings.”

SEERaise a beer to Penny Marshall, who talked like a Bronx truck driver and directed mass-appeal films like a pro

Bernardo Bertolucci died on November 26 at age 77. His 1987 film “The Last Emperor” swept the Oscars, including for Best Picture and Best Director. Other movies in his career included “Last Tango in Paris,” “The Conformist,” “The Sheltering Sky” and “Little Buddha.”

Screenwriter William Goldman died
See full article at Gold Derby »

Celebrity Deaths 2018: ‘In Memoriam’ gallery celebrates 25, including Stan Lee, Burt Reynolds, Aretha Franklin

Celebrity Deaths 2018: ‘In Memoriam’ gallery celebrates 25, including Stan Lee, Burt Reynolds, Aretha Franklin
With just six weeks left for 2018, Gold Derby celebrates over 40 celebrities and entertainers who died in the past 12 months. Tour our photo gallery above as we feature tributes to 25 losses from this year so far.

Stan Lee, co-creator of many iconic superheroes, died on November 12 at age 95. For Marvel Comics and later many films and TV programs, his characters included Spider-Man, the Fantastic Four, X-Men, Iron Man, Hulk, Captain America and the Avengers.

Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen died on October 15 at age 65. He and Bill Gates helped start the microcomputer revolution in the mid-1970s by creating the world’s largest PC software company.

Burt Reynolds died on September 6 at age 82 in Florida. He was an Oscar nominee for “Boogie Nights” and an Emmy winner for “Evening Shade.” He was one of the top box office stars of the 1970s with movies such as “Deliverance,” “Smokey and the Bandit,” “The Longest Yard,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Emmys 2018: In Memoriam remembers Anthony Bourdain, Burt Reynolds but who was left out?

Emmys 2018: In Memoriam remembers Anthony Bourdain, Burt Reynolds but who was left out?
The special “In Memoriam” segment on the 2018 Emmy Awards ceremony was tearful as beloved television legends Steven Bochco, Anthony Bourdain, Robert Guillaume, Monty Hall, John Mahoney, Jim Nabors, Charlotte Rae, Burt Reynolds, Neil Simon and Craig Zadan were part of the annual tribute.

SEEEmmy winners 2018: Full list of winners and nominees at the 70th Emmy Awards

But who was missing from the memoriam this time? Some of those surprising omissions included:

Marty Allen (actor/comedian)

Peter Baldwin (director)

Brent Briscoe (actor)

Dushon Monique Brown (actor)

Frank Buxton (writer/director)

Joseph Campanella (actor)

Olivia Cole (actor)

Vic Damone (actor/singer)

Bradford Dillman (actor)

Roy Dotrice (actor)

John Dunsworth (actor)

Harlan Ellison (writer)

Nanette Fabray (actor)

Dominic Frontiere (composer)

Michael Gershman (cinematographer)

Billy Graham (host)

Vanessa Greene (producer)

Doug Grindstaff (sound editor)

John Hillerman (actor)

Rance Howard (actor)

Tab Hunter (actor)

Earle Hyman (actor)

Anne Jeffreys (actor)

Margot Kidder (actor)

Louise Latham
See full article at Gold Derby »

Emmys 2018: In Memoriam to honor Burt Reynolds, Anthony Bourdain, Jim Nabors and over 50 more TV legends

Emmys 2018: In Memoriam to honor Burt Reynolds, Anthony Bourdain, Jim Nabors and over 50 more TV legends
The special “In Memoriam” segment on the 2018 Emmy Awards ceremony will be especially tearful this year. Beloved television legends Steven Bochco, Anthony Bourdain, Robert Guillaume, Monty Hall, John Mahoney, Jim Nabors, Charlotte Rae, Burt Reynolds, Neil Simon and Craig Zadan will certainly be just a few people honored with in a musical tribute.

Let’s take a look back at these TV icons as well as over 50 others who have died since mid-September last year. Many will be included in the memoriam for the live Emmys ceremony hosted by Michael Che and Colin Jost for NBC on September 17.

SEECelebrity Deaths 2018: In Memoriam Gallery

Bochco died on April 1 at age 74. The 10-time Emmy winner was the creator of such TV classics as “Hill Street Blues,” “L.A. Law,” “NYPD Blue” and “Doogie Howser, M.D.” He was inducted into the Television Academy Hall of Fame in 1996.

Bourdain died in France on June
See full article at Gold Derby »

When Burt Reynolds Complained About Me to Johnny Carson on ‘The Tonight Show’ (Guest Blog)

  • The Wrap
When Burt Reynolds Complained About Me to Johnny Carson on ‘The Tonight Show’ (Guest Blog)
My wife and I were watching “The Tonight Show With Johnny Carson” one night in April, 1985 when Burt Reynolds came on as one of Johnny’s guests. I was interested in the banter between them for a couple of reasons.

I liked Reynolds a lot. Though he had of late been starring in cornball chase movies like “Stroker Ace,” “Cannonball Run” and the “Smokey and the Bandit” films, I would be forever grateful for his dramatic performance in the 1972 “Deliverance.” What a movie! He’d also shown his range in Alan J. Pakula’s light romantic comedy “Starting Over.” Plus, he was just a lot of fun.

More urgently, I was interested because he was on the show to promote a new movie adapted from Elmore Leonard’s novel “Stick.” He was both the movie’s star and its director and, a few months earlier, I’d been on the
See full article at The Wrap »

Deadpool’s Ryan Reynolds Pays Tribute To Burt Reynolds In His Own Special Way

Yesterday, we lost a true Hollywood iconic.

Burt Reynolds, star of Deliverance, Boogie Nights and Smokey and the Bandit, passed away at the age of 82, leaving behind a cinematic legacy that is practically unparalleled. He was the undisputed box office king during the late 1970s, starring in the likes of Starting Over and The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas.

That signature Burt Reynolds charm allowed him to become a household name, before scoring an Oscar nomination for his performance as porn director Jack Horner in the Paul Thomas Anderson classic, Boogie Nights. Reynolds ultimately lucked out to Robin Williams, who clinched the industry’s biggest accolade for his role in Good Will Hunting.

Nevertheless, he leaves behind a rich and diverse back catalog, and will be sorely missed by all – including Deadpool 2 star Ryan Reynolds, who took to Twitter to pay tribute for the legendary actor in his own special way,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Film News: Burt Reynolds, The Movie Star King, Dies at 82

Jupiter, Fla – When I met Burt Reynolds in 2011, I knew I was meeting Hollywood royalty… he filled the room as a Movie Star King. He was frail at that time, complaining of the injuries he endured in the over 90 films in his career, but nothing stopped his stardom until it was over. Reynolds died on September 6th, 2018. He was 82.

Burt was age 75 at our meeting, and he still had that the charm bearing that audiences adored in his heyday in the 1970s and early ‘80s, when he was the King of the Box Office. He started in 1950s TV, bounced around in that and B-movies in the ‘60s, and found his niche as a humor-motivated “good old boy” in a series of films in the ‘70s, culminating with “Smokey and the Bandit” in 1977, his most memorable hit. But even in his later years, he broke ground with “Boogie Nights,” and worked up to the end…
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Burt Reynolds: A Great Actor, and a Movie Star Who Refused to Take Stardom Seriously

  • Variety
Burt Reynolds: A Great Actor, and a Movie Star Who Refused to Take Stardom Seriously
You could say that no actor ever fitted into his time, or defined it, as quintessentially as Burt Reynolds. His box-office sizzle lingered into the early ’80s, but the classic Reynolds era will always be the 1970s, a decade he swaggered through with a slightly brooding easy-livin’ macho twinkle that no other movie star could touch. He was something unique: the first Hollywood stud who knew how to laugh at himself, not just off camera but on camera. Reynolds looked like a smiling dreamboat Greek god with a mustache, and the thing about his handsomeness was how much character it had. The eyes that could melt you with their crinkly charm, or stare off lonely and a bit lost, or turn into slits of anger. The thick lips that pulled back into a smile that let you know he knew how irresistible he was. He looked like Marlon Brando if
See full article at Variety »

Burt Reynolds Appreciation: A Classic Movie Star With a Modern Sense of Humor

  • The Wrap
Burt Reynolds Appreciation: A Classic Movie Star With a Modern Sense of Humor
Much has been written about the New Hollywood of the 1970s and how it was formed by a group of bearded film-school grads who grew up on a diet of cinema and broke the hidebound rules of the studio system. But there’s no talking about American film in the Me Decade without discussing the impact of Burt Reynolds, the iconic star who encapsulated so much of the era’s freewheeling attitudes and post-modern sensibilities.

Unlikely the falsely humble stars of yore, Reynolds clearly reveled in being a movie star, whether he was yukking it up on Johnny Carson’s couch or mugging through silly all-star extravaganzas like “The Cannonball Run.” He had the cool of the Rat Pack, but in a way that seemed more attainable to a country mired in recession; Reynolds’ public vibe always leaned closer to a six-pack and a Trans Am than to martinis and limousines.
See full article at The Wrap »

Burt Reynolds dead at 82: Our appreciation of a guy’s guy and ladies’ man always having a good time

  • Gold Derby
Burt Reynolds dead at 82: Our appreciation of a guy’s guy and ladies’ man always having a good time
Burt Reynolds was a guy’s guy, a ladies’ man, the ruggedly handsome alpha male of the entertainment world, who always seemed to be having a good time – whether cracking jokes on TV talk shows with pals like Dom DeLuise or saucily posing nude as a centerfold in “Cosmopolitan” magazine — except maybe when he broke his leg during that ill-fated canoe outing in 1972’s “Deliverance,” his breakout film role. According to his reps on Thursday, the actor is dead at age 82 in his adopted home of Jupiter, Florida.

With a thicket of hair, a dapper mustache and a twinkle in his eye, he often came across as a good ol’ Southern boy in such films as “Smokey and the Bandit,” “W,W. and the Dixie Dancekings” and “The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas,” while claiming to be from Georgia. But he was born in Lansing, Michigan, although he would eventually end up in Riviera Beach,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Burt Reynolds, 1970s/'80s Film Icon and Emmy Winner, Dead at 82

Burt Reynolds, 1970s/'80s Film Icon and Emmy Winner, Dead at 82
Burt Reynolds, a staple of machismo-fueled, good ol’ boy movies from the 1970s and 1980s and an Emmy winner for his role on TV’s Evening Shade, died of a heart attack on Thursday. He was 82.

Reynolds’ long film resume includes free-wheeling larks such as Smokey and the Bandit and Stroker Ace, the comedies Semi-Tough and Cannonball Run, and more serious fare such as Deliverance (which earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Picture), Starting Over, Hustle and The Longest Yard.

In 1998, Reynolds received his first Academy Award nod, for a supporting role in Boogie Nights that also earned him a Golden Globe.
See full article at TVLine.com »

Burt Reynolds Dies: Iconic Star Of ‘Deliverance’, ‘Smokey And The Bandit’ & ‘Boogie Nights’ Was 82

  • Deadline
Burt Reynolds Dies: Iconic Star Of ‘Deliverance’, ‘Smokey And The Bandit’ & ‘Boogie Nights’ Was 82
Burt Reynolds, a top Hollywood star of the 1970s whose hits ranged from such classic, easy-going drive-in fare as Smokey and the Bandit to the intense, hunted-men drama Deliverance, died today at the Jupiter Medical Center in Florida. He was 82.

“It is with a broken heart that I said goodbye to my uncle today,” Reynolds’ niece Nancy Lee Hess said in a statement (read it in full below).

With a sly, knowing grin, signature moustache and a unique blend of charm and machismo, Reynolds was a bona fide cultural phenomenon. He became a frequent guest of Johnny Carson’s Tonight Show, was the first major celebrity nude male centerfold and off-screen romantic partner of such stars as frequent co-star Sally Field and Dinah Shore. Reyrolds would achieve a newfound respect among critics and fans alike for the late-career peak in 1997’s Boogie Nights, for which he earned his only Oscar nomination.
See full article at Deadline »

Burt Reynolds, Star of ‘Deliverance,’ ‘Smokey and the Bandit,’ Dies at 82

  • Variety
Burt Reynolds, Star of ‘Deliverance,’ ‘Smokey and the Bandit,’ Dies at 82
Burt Reynolds, one of Hollywood’s most popular leading men during the ’70s and early ’80s in such films as “Deliverance,” “Smokey and the Bandit, “The Longest Yard” and “Semi-Tough,” has died. His rep confirmed that he died Thursday in Jupiter, Fla. He was 82.

He later earned an Oscar nomination as best supporting actor in Paul Thomas Anderson’s ode to skin flicks, “Boogie Nights.” He had been set to appear in Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon a Hollywood.”

Reynolds’ appeal lay in his post-modern macho posture undercut by a wry self-awareness, which he used to good effect in comedies as well as action films. For a period during the ’70s he was the nation’s top box office draw. But after one too many bad movies, his popularity waned. He returned to television, where he’d gotten his start, mostly in Westerns, and produced his own sitcom, “Evening Shade,” which brought him an Emmy.
See full article at Variety »

Arnold Schwarzenegger, Billy Dee Williams, Steve Harvey Among Stars Paying Tribute to Burt Reynolds

Arnold Schwarzenegger, Billy Dee Williams, Steve Harvey Among Stars Paying Tribute to Burt Reynolds
Hollywood stars were heartbroken over the news of Burt Reynolds' death on Thursday and took to social media to pay tribute to the late actor. Reynolds, who is most recognized for his roles in Boogie Nights and Deliverance, died at Jupiter Medical Center in Florida, his manager, Erik Kritzer, told The Hollywood Reporter. The actor was 82. 

The accomplished actor was notorious for starring in a variety of action films and romantic comedies, including Starting Over (1979) opposite Jill Clayburgh and Candice Bergen; The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (1982) with Dolly PartonBest Friends (1982) with Goldie Hawn; and ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Veteran Syndication Exec Linda Finnell Out at NBCUniversal (Exclusive)

NBCUniversal Distribution senior vice president of programming and development Linda Finnell is departing the company, insiders tell TheWrap.

Finnell’s responsibilities will be absorbed by her colleagues, a person with knowledge of the division’s inner-workings tells us. Department creative consultant Maureen Fitzpatrick, who was brought in from CBS by Paul Telegdy, is also expected to play a key role there in the post-Finnell days — especially when it comes to revitalizing “Access Hollywood,” which now just goes by “Access.”

Finnell reports in to Tracie Wilson, who runs the syndication arm. Finnell was in the office Thursday and is said to be parting ways with her longterm company on good terms. Her contract was simply not renewed, insiders said.

Also Read: Why Mark Steines Is No Longer Hallmark 'Home & Family' Co-Host (Exclusive)

Finnell did not immediately respond to a request for comment Thursday.

Finnell has had a tough time launching successful shows lately.
See full article at The Wrap »

Candice Bergen "Is Living the Life She Always Dreamed of" at Age 72 (Exclusive)

Actress and former model Candice Bergen strode proudly onto the stage of NYC's Carnegie Hall, flanked by her Murphy Brown co-stars, at CBS' recent fall lineup announcement. "It's so great to have the gang back together," she said. "And to hear Americans cheering for a bunch of journalists." It's the kind of timely wisecrack Murphy often made on the hit 1988 to 1998 sitcom and will continue to make on the show's upcoming reboot. And like her character, Candice always tells it like it is. While recently addressing her youthful good looks, she told People that, "People who don't have it think beauty is a blessing, but actually it sets you apart." And when it comes to her later-in-life weight gain, she wrote in her memoir, A Fine Romance, "I am fat. I live to eat." Murphy Brown...together again. Coming to your neighborhood TV in the fall. Just in time.
See full article at Closer Weekly »

Burt Reynolds movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Deliverance,’ ‘Boogie Nights,’ ‘Smokey and the Bandit’

Burt Reynolds movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Deliverance,’ ‘Boogie Nights,’ ‘Smokey and the Bandit’
In the 1970s, Burt Reynolds was arguably the biggest movie star in the world. He had made his name through television, appearing as a regular for 50 episodes on the hit series “Gunsmoke,” then headlining his own series, “Hawk” and “Dan August.” But then Reynolds got his big break in feature films, co-starring in the John Boorman classic “Deliverance” (1972).

Though Reynolds was soon starring in such box-office hits as “The Longest Yard” and “Smokey and the Bandit,” he never abandoned television, utilizing such talk shows as “The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson” (where he was one of the funniest guests ever) to hone his image, strutting on as a sex symbol and then acting like an utter goofball once he sat the guest’s chair. The contrast between the Cosmopolitan centerfold and the delightful talk show guest endeared Reynolds to moviegoers.

In between his more serious films, such as 1979’s “Starting Over,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Burt Reynolds movies: 12 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Burt Reynolds movies: 12 greatest films ranked from worst to best
In the 1970s, Burt Reynolds was arguably the biggest movie star in the world. He had made his name through television, appearing as a regular for 50 episodes on the hit series “Gunsmoke,” then headlining his own series, “Hawk” and “Dan August.” But then Reynolds got his big break in feature films, co-starring in the John Boorman classic “Deliverance” (1972).

Though Reynolds was soon starring in such box-office hits as “The Longest Yard” and “Smokey and the Bandit,” he never abandoned television, utilizing such talk shows as “The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson” (where he was one of the funniest guests ever) to hone his image, strutting on as a sex symbol and then acting like an utter goofball once he sat the guest’s chair. The contrast between the Cosmopolitan centerfold and the delightful talk show guest endeared Reynolds to moviegoers.

In between his more serious films, such as 1979’s “Starting Over,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars flashback: Meryl Streep exclaims ‘Holy mackerel’ winning her 1st Oscar for ‘Kramer vs. Kramer’ [Watch]

Oscars flashback: Meryl Streep exclaims ‘Holy mackerel’ winning her 1st Oscar for ‘Kramer vs. Kramer’ [Watch]
Believe it or not, long before a record-shattering 21 Oscar nominations, there was a time when Meryl Streep was not the queen of the movies. After finishing at Yale Drama School in the 1970s, Streep found steady work on stage and television before her breakout role in 1978’s Best Picture Oscar winner, “The Deer Hunter.” That film brought Streep her first Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress (and first loss) for her performance as Linda, the fiancee of a troubled Vietnam vet (Christopher Walken in an Oscar-winning performance).

The following year she starred in three major films: as the love interest of Alan Alda in “The Seduction of Joe Tynan;” as Woody Allen’s lesbian ex-wife in “Manhattan;” and as the troubled Joanna Kramer opposite Dustin Hoffman in “Kramer vs Kramer.” It was that latter role that brought her a first-ever win at the Academy Awards. The first words exclaimed by Streep were “Holy mackerel!
See full article at Gold Derby »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites


Recently Viewed