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An Evolution of Dragon Stories: Dragonslayer by Duncan M. Hamilton

Bridget Lamonica Jul 31, 2019

We look at how Dragonslayer by Duncan M Hamilton fits into the long-running fantasy subgenre involving dragons.

When Guillot is tasked with slaying the last of the dragons in Duncan M. Hamilton's Dragonslayer, the first in a planned fantasy trilogy, the character is way past his prime. All bets should be on the dragon, but a semblance of that knightly duty remains—even though Guillot struggles with alcoholism and is actively thwarted by someone high in power, there's tension in the narrative. Could Guillot actually win?

read more: Ruin of Kings is Must-Read Epic Fantasy

Knights and dragons -- it’s a tale as old as fiction and mythology. The traditional sort of dragon—winged, fire breathing—was popularized in the Middle Ages, the most famous story being St. George slaying the dragon. That story was immortalized in a Raphael painting, circa 1506, titled "Saint George and the Dragon,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Duncan M. Hamilton Talks Fantasy Trilogy Dragonslayer

Bridget Lamonica Jul 25, 2019

We got some insights into the world of Dragonslayer from fantasy author Duncan M. Hamilton.

The first in a planned trilogy, Dragonslayer is the story of Guillot, a dragonslayer in a seemingly now-dragonless world.

Once a great swordfighter, following the death of his wife five years prior and feeling purposeless without, Gill has struggled with alcohol abuse and a purpose-less life. When a dragon—a species formerly thought extinct, begins terrorizing nearby towns—Gill is ordered by the king to slay it, unbeknownstly pulling him into a larger plot that could have repercussions across the entire kingdom.

read more: Ruin of Kings is Must-Read Epic Fantasy

We had the chance to chat with Hamilton about creating the world of Dragonslayer. Here's what he told us...

Den of Geek: In this novel, we get several chapters where we see from the dragon's point of view. Since discovering his mate and brood were killed,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Amazon Prime Video schedule: Here’s what is coming and leaving in April 2019

Amazon Prime Video has confirmed that several original shows will be debuting new episodes on the streaming service in April, including the fifth season of the crime drama “Bosch,” the sophomore season of the comedy “The Tick” and the first edition of the children’s animated show “Bug Diaries.”

Likewise, there will be plenty of movies making their first appearances on Amazon Prime Video in April including the Oscar-nominated horror film “A Quiet Place,” a slew of films in the Bond franchise and all three entries in the “Blade” trilogy.

Below is the full schedule of everything that is coming to Amazon Prime Video in April 2019. Unlike Netflix, Amazon does not disclose the shows and movies leaving the service in any given month. We’ve done some digging and unearthed a few titles that will be exiting Amazon Prime Video in the first week of April.

See Netflix schedule: Here
See full article at Gold Derby »

Everything New Coming to Amazon Prime Video in April

  • The Wrap
Amazon Prime Video has released its roster of new content coming to it April, and the list includes a new Prime Original along with new seasons of “Bosch,” “The Tick,” and “Diablo Guardián.”

The first season of “Bug Diaries,” a Prime Original animated series for preschoolers, follows Spider, Fly and Worm on their daily adventures recorded in their bug diaries. From riding on a dog’s back to dodging raindrops, the three bug buddies will appear on the streamer starting April 12.

Season 5 of “Bosch” picks up 15 months after Det. Harry Bosch caught his mother’s killer. Per the streamer’s description, new evidence in an old case leaves everyone wondering whether Bosch planted evidence to convict the wrong guy. And a murder at a Hollywood pharmacy exposes a sophisticated opioid pill mill, sending Bosch down a dark and perilous path in pursuit of the killers. It drops April 19.

Also Read:
See full article at The Wrap »

Here’s a List of Everything Coming to and Leaving Hulu in April

  • The Wrap
Hulu’s list of comings and goings for the month of April is out, and the roster for new content on the streaming service includes two Hulu Originals — the first season premiere of “Ramy,” and the seventh episode of “Into The Dark: I’m Just F*cking With You,” with other highlights including Season 3 of Freeform’s “The Bold Type” and John Krasinski’s “A Quiet Place.”

“Ramy,” debuting April 19, tells the story of first generation Egyptian-American Ramy Hassan as he finds himself in his New Jersey neighborhood, stuck at a crossroads between the morals of his Muslim community and the moral ambiguity of his millennial generation. “Into The Dark: I’m Just F*cking With You,” coming April 1, finds two siblings in a secluded motel, where they become subject to practical jokes of an increasingly frightening nature.

Also Read: Oscar-Winning Documentary 'Free Solo' Now Available for Streaming on Hulu
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Warning Sign’ Blu-ray Debut Coming March 26th

Scream Factory is filling another hole in your horror-thriller Blu-ray collection on March 26th with the high definition debut of 1985's Warning Sign.

Sam Waterston, Kathleen Quinlan and Yaphet Kotto star in the virus outbreak flick from the writing team behind DragonslayerHal Barwood and Matthew Robbins.

It wouldn't be a Scream Factory release without some new bonus features. Sure enough, there are a pair joined by some legacy extras to complete the package.

Here's the full Warning Sign disc contents rundown:

New interview with director/co-writer Hal Barwood

New interview with producer Jim Bloom

Audio commentary track with director /co-writer Hal Barwood

TV Spot

Theatrical Trailer

Still Gallery

Pre-order Warning Sign on Blu-ray for a discounted price at Amazon.
See full article at TheHDRoom »

Full Release Details for Scream Factory’s Warning Sign Blu-ray

  • DailyDead
In Warning Sign, a deadly virus not only infects its victims, it turns them into cold-blooded killing machines as well. Starring Sam Waterston, Kathleen Quinlan, and Yaphet Kotto, Warning Sign is coming to Blu-ray on May 26th from the team at Scream Factory, and they've provided us with the full release details for the Blu-ray, including a new interview with director/co-writer Hal Barwood.

Press Release: When tampering with the natural order of things, man must not ignore the Warning Sign. Making its Blu-ray debut on March 26th, 2019 from Scream Factory, the suspenseful thriller Warning Sign also includes a number of bonus features, including a new interview with director/co-writer Hal Barwood and a new interview with producer Jim Bloom, as well as a still gallery, theatrical trailers and more! Fans can pre-order their copies now by visiting ShoutFactory.com

In the rolling Utah countryside, a small town is host to a fortress-like research facility,
See full article at DailyDead »

Scream Factory Announces New Blu-ray Releases for 2019, Including Tarantula (1955), The Witches (1966), and Man’S Best Friend (1993)

  • DailyDead
With 2018 coming to an end, Scream Factory is giving horror fans plenty of titles to get excited about in 2019 with a bunch of new Blu-ray announcements for March, including 1955's Tarantula, Man's Best Friend (1993), 1966's The Witches (starring Joan Fontaine), and more!

From Scream Factory: "We’re being attacked by giant insects next Spring as the 1950s cult favorites Tarantula and The Deadly Mantis both scuttle to Blu-ray on March 19th!

Tarantula (1955) – Biochemist Gerald Deemer has a plan to feed the world by using a growth formula on plants and animals. Instead he creates terror beyond imagining when his work spawns a spider of mammoth proportions! Feeding on cattle and humans, this towering tarantula has the people of Desert Rock, Arizona running for their lives. Can this horrifying creature be stopped or will the world succumb to its giant claws? This classic sci-fi film from director Jack Arnold stars John Agar
See full article at DailyDead »

Cate Blanchett Would Love a Job on Television

  • Variety
Cate Blanchett Would Love a Job on Television
A funny thing happened at the premiere of “The House With a Clock in Its Walls” at the Tcl Chinese Theatre in Hollywood on Sunday: Several minutes into the movie, the screen abruptly froze on an image of Colleen Camp, who plays Jack Black’s nosy neighbor, Mrs. Hanchett, and her little dog, too.

Eli Roth jumped out of his seat and went into director mode to downplay what turned out to be an issue with the back-up projector, according to a Universal rep. “During a really, really scary scene, if we all hear Jack Black burping, it’s probably not going to work as well,” Roth explained to the packed house. “So if you can all bear with me, I think that we need [child star] Owen Vaccaro to stand up and lead us in a magical spell for us to restart the movie.”

Some of the younger audience members protested,
See full article at Variety »

Crowdfund This: Phil Tippett's Mad God, Demented Stop-Motion Animation

I confess that the first two parts of Phil Tippett's Mad God completely passed me by, but now that a kind reader has tipped us off to the existence of Part 3, all I can say is ... wow! Tippett has enjoyed a long career as a visual artist, receiving Academy Award nominations for Dragonslayer, Return of the Jedi, Willow, Jurassic Park, Dragonheart, and Starship Troopers, and taking the Oscar home three times. Of course, that's only the tip of the iceberg; his credits include all three original RoboCop movies, House II: The Second Story, and "demon supervisor" on The Golden Child. Tippett has been increasingly focusing his efforts on Mad God, an epic stop-motion animation project that looks absolutely fantastic, judging by the video...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

'80s Fantasy Movie Moments That Terrified Us as Kids

Ryan Lambie Mar 3, 2019

Fearsome monsters, grasping hands, and a suggestive tree. Here are 10 fantasy movie moments that scarred us as kids...

This article comes from Den of Geek UK.

Sooner or later, you're going to see a scary movie. Whether you sneak down and watch a horror film on late night television, watch a Nightmare on Elm Street sequel at a friend's house or watch clips of slasher movies on YouTube, horror movies are always out there, waiting in the wings for the young and curious. But long before most of us graduate to the stage in our lives where we start seeking out R-rated movies of gore and terror, we reliably encounter scary moments in what might initially seem to be harmless family adventure films.

The 1980s was an unusually fertile period for dark fantasies where the seeming lightness of their subject matter--dragons, unicorns and other mythical beasts--was joined by odd jabs of darkness,
See full article at Den of Geek »

80s fantasy movie moments that terrified us as kids

Ryan Lambie Mar 22, 2017

Fearsome monsters, grasping hands, and a suggestive tree. Here are 10 fantasy movie moments that scarred us as kids...

Sooner or later, you're going to see a scary movie. Whether you sneak down and watch a horror film on late night television, watch a Nightmare On Elm Street sequel round a friend's house or watch clips of slasher movies on YouTube, horror movies are always out there, waiting in the wings for the young and curious.

See related The Last Kingdom series 2 episode 1 review The Last Kingdom series 2: politics, battles and arselings What can we expect from new BBC drama, The Last Kingdom?

But long before most of us graduate to the stage of our lives where we start seeking out 18-rated movies of gore and terror, we reliably encounter scary moments in what might initially seem to be harmless family adventure films.

The 1980s was an
See full article at Den of Geek »

Exploring Disney's fascinating dark phase of the 70s and 80s

Ryan Lambie Dec 7, 2016

Space horror in The Black Hole. Animated death in The Black Cauldron. Ryan looks back at a unique period in Disney's filmmaking history...

When George Lucas started writing Star Wars in the early 70s, the space saga was intended to fill a void left behind by westerns, pirate movies and the sci-fi fantasy of old matinee serials. "Disney had abdicated its rein over the children's market," Lucas once said, according to Peter Biskind's book, Easy Riders, Raging Bulls, "and nothing had replaced it."

See related  Close To The Enemy episode 4 review Close To The Enemy episode 3 review Close To The Enemy episode 2 review Close To The Enemy episode 1 review

Indeed, Disney was one of many Hollywood studios that Lucas had approached with Star Wars and they, just like Universal, United Artists and everyone other than 20th Century Fox boss Alan Ladd Jr, had turned it down flat.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Patrick Duffy Resurfaces With New ‘Man From Atlantis’ Novel And In-depth Tales For Famous Monsters Exclusive

Patrick Duffy Resurfaces With New ‘Man From Atlantis’ Novel And In-depth Tales For Famous Monsters Exclusive
“The pilot and the first couple of two-hour movies were the thing that really cemented it as legitimate science fiction. … Then we sort of got off the rails a little bit.” — Patrick Duffy to Famous Monsters magazine

Dallas and Step By Step television star Patrick Duffy returns to his underwater roots with an all-new adventure in book form based on his first major prime-time TV show, The Man From Atlantis, to be published in June. He spoke exclusively to Famous Monsters of Filmland editor David Weiner.

From marathon underwater filming sessions in which he had to hold his breath for up to two minutes at a time to those revealing yellow swim trunks — and how they “neutralized” his gender details for television — the candid Duffy reflects on his classic ’70s show and also previews his new novel — with plans to write a trilogy — based on Man From Atlantis.

Duffy with
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »

Director Paul Feig Defends Ghostbusters in latest Famous Monsters Exclusive

Director Paul Feig Defends Ghostbusters in latest Famous Monsters Exclusive
“People are always going to react the way they react, and that’s the joy and terribleness of the Internet.” — Paul Feig to Famous Monsters magazine

The all-new Ghostbusters are powering up their proton packs for a big-screen summer release on July 15. While many franchise fans are excited for the female-driven reset of the beloved ’80s comedy starring Kristen Wiig, Melissa McCarthy, Kate McKinnon, and Leslie Jones, a very vocal faction of the Internet has expressed its distaste for the reboot concept and its first teaser trailer.

At Famous Monsters of Filmland, we always give any film the benefit of the doubt before watching it, and wanted to give accomplished Ghostbusters director Paul Feig (Bridesmaids, The Heat, Spy) an opportunity to not only share his creative inspirations for approaching the new film — along with sharing his comedy-casting criteria — but to address those adamantly opposed to his film, despite not having even seen the finished product.
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »

John Boorman's Excalibur Isn't Just Another King Arthur Movie

Jim Knipfel Apr 17, 2019

The legend of King Arthur has never been more stylized or strange than it was in John Boorman's Excalibur.

After so many centuries as an inescapable figure in literature, art, poetry, comics, movies, cartoons, and on TV, it still seemed in 1975 Monty Python had offered the final word on the legend of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table with Monty Python and the Holy Grail. I mean, after the holy hand grenade, what more was there to say?

Then six years later along came Excalibur.

As directors go, John Boorman has always been a weirdie, and a tough one to pin down. In the late ’60s he gave us two of the most fundamental pictures of Lee Marvin’s career with Point Blank and Hell in the Pacific. He then moved onto the unforgettable backwoods savagery of 1972’s Deliverance. Throughout the rest of
See full article at Den of Geek »

50 More of the Greatest Matte Paintings of All Time

A few years ago the editors of Shadowlocked asked me to compile a list of what was initially to be, the ten greatest movie matte paintings of all time. A mere ten selections was too slim by a long shot, so my list stretched considerably to twenty, then thirty and finally a nice round fifty entries. Even with that number I found it wasn’t easy to narrow down a suitably wide ranging showcase of motion picture matte art that best represented the artform. So with that in mind, and due to the surprising popularity of that 2012 Shadowlocked list (which is well worth a visit, here Ed), I’ve assembled a further fifty wonderful examples of this vast, vital and more extensively utilised than you’d imagine – though now sadly ‘dead and buried’ – movie magic.

It would of course be so easy to simply concentrate on the well known, iconic,
See full article at Shadowlocked »

“Guillermo’s Got a Wonderfully Unhealthy Obsession with Insects”: Screenwriter Matthew Robbins on Crimson Peak

If screenwriter Matthew Robbins had penned the pivotal moments of his movie life, he might not have come up with anything better than the reality. Robbins fell in love with movies in Paris while studying abroad alongside his college roommate, future editing legend Walter Murch. After writing Steven Spielberg’s debut theatrical feature (The Sugarland Express) and directing the fondly remembered 1980s fantasy films Dragonslayer and *batteries not included, Robbins found himself in Guadalajara, Mexico as part of a program to mentor aspiring filmmakers. He was assigned a 29-year-old with a fondness for insects and ghost stories named Guillermo del Toro. […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

“Guillermo’s Got a Wonderfully Unhealthy Obsession with Insects”: Screenwriter Matthew Robbins on Crimson Peak

If screenwriter Matthew Robbins had penned the pivotal moments of his movie life, he might not have come up with anything better than the reality. Robbins fell in love with movies in Paris while studying abroad alongside his college roommate, future editing legend Walter Murch. After writing Steven Spielberg’s debut theatrical feature (The Sugarland Express) and directing the fondly remembered 1980s fantasy films Dragonslayer and *batteries not included, Robbins found himself in Guadalajara, Mexico as part of a program to mentor aspiring filmmakers. He was assigned a 29-year-old with a fondness for insects and ghost stories named Guillermo del Toro. […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Crimson Peak - the new international trailer

Guillermo del Toro's back with the gothic horror, Crimson Peak. Here's the brand new international trailer...

Following his larger-than-life monsters versus robots banquet Pacific Rim, director Guillermo del Toro's back with a relatively contained gothic horror film.

Called Crimson Peak, it has a splash of Hammer Horror flamboyance and the director's own colourful appetite for the macabre. Mia Wasikowska, Tom Hiddleston and Jessica Chastain are among the cast, while the plot concerns an author, her childhood friend and a house full of ghosts and secrets.

A lover of embellished surfaces, del Toro appears to have given every inch of his title building a patina of age and wear. We'll have to wait and see what the story, penned by del Toro and veteran screenwriter Matthew Robbins (The Sugarland Express, Dragonslayer, del Toro's Mimic) holds, but one thing's for sure - it looks marvellous.

Crimson Peak is out in
See full article at Den of Geek »
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