Just Good Friends (1983) - News Poster

(1983–1986)

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Check what has Tanuj Virwani to say about his work

Actor Tanuj Virwani gives precedence to stories, but says he will not be part of a project which makes one cringe.

He was recently seen in an episode of Voot's "Fuh se Fantasy". In the episode titled 'Just Good Friends', he features as Tahir who meets Leela (Madhurima Roy) and Kiara (Satarupa Pyne). The episode shows them having an intimate adventure.

"My funda before signing on any new project is not to be too judgmental about it -- are there any bold scenes in it or is there any cringe worthy.... For me, story is king," Tanuj said in a statement.

"There's something about the casual air that the story had about these three characters, Tahir, Kiara and Leela, who don't know about each other. They happen to meet by coincidence and strike a friendship with no right and wrongs. There is no expectation from each other and yet it flows so beautifully,
See full article at GlamSham »

Sylvia Kay obituary

Stage and screen actor who played the snobbish mother Daphne in the BBC sitcom Just Good Friends

The actor Sylvia Kay, who has died aged 82, spent much of her career in television drama, but found her greatest fame as Daphne Warrender, the snobbish mother of the sophisticated Penny (played by Jan Francis) in the writer John Sullivan’s sitcom Just Good Friends, in which Penny is reunited with a former boyfriend, Vince Pinner (Paul Nicholas), five years after he stood her up at the altar.

Sniping between the social classes was a crucial ingredient of the humour in the programme, which ran from 1983 to 1986. Daphne and her husband, Norman (John Ringham), who regard Vince as a wideboy and refer to him as “Thing”, look down on Vince’s father, Les (Shaun Curry), a scrap dealer who drives his wife, Rita (Ann Lynn), around in a flashy car with rock’n’roll music booming out.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Dr Who: films of Peter Davison, Colin Baker, Sylvester McCoy

Feature Alex Westthorp 16 Apr 2014 - 07:00

Alex's trek through the film roles of actors who've played the Doctor reaches Peter Davison, Colin Baker and Sylvester McCoy...

Read the previous part in this series, Doctor Who: the film careers of Patrick Troughton and Tom Baker, here.

In March 1981, as he made his Doctor Who debut, Peter Davison was already one the best known faces on British television. Not only was he the star of both a BBC and an ITV sitcom - Sink Or Swim and Holding The Fort - but as the young and slightly reckless Tristan Farnon in All Creatures Great And Small, about the often humorous cases of Yorkshire vet James Herriot and his colleagues, he had cemented his stardom. The part led, indirectly, to his casting as the venerable Time Lord.

The recently installed Doctor Who producer, John Nathan-Turner, had been the Production Unit Manager on
See full article at Den of Geek »

The 10 Best British TV Writers

  • bestbritishtv
House of Cards

Kieran Kinsella

David Croft

If you write a list of your 10 favorite British TV sitcom characters, probably half of them were created by comic genius David Croft. His creations include Mr Humphries (Are You Being Served?), Sergeant Major ‘Shut up’ Williams (It Ain’t Half Hot Mum) Herr Flick (Allo, Allo) and Corporal Jones (Dad’s Army). Like many great comedy writers, Croft collaborated with others including Jimmy Perry and David Floyd. Few writers though could match his creativity or career longevity. Such was Croft’s popularity that he was a regular guest on the British TV convention circuit right up until his death at the age of 89.

Paul Abbott

BAFTA and Emmy winning writer Paul Abbott, rose from humble origins to become one of the most successful writers in British TV history. His hard-hitting dramas are far removed from the idyllic world of Marple and Midsomer Murders.
See full article at bestbritishtv »

Alexander Armstrong hits back at 'tribal aversion' to posh comics

Armstrong and Miller comic lambasts 'inverse snobbery' while Ricky Gervais teaches guitar – and who's the hottest comedian?

This week's comedy news

We begin with the Telegraph's tale of Alexander Armstrong and the apparent victimisation of "posh" comics. "Why should your background be held against you?," asks the descendant of William the Conqueror, alumnus of a Durham public school and director of a production company called Toff Media. "It is so short-sighted … This tribal aversion to anyone with a posh voice is very boring." Armstrong – best known as one half of the sketch double-act Armstrong and Miller – even lodges the improbable complaint that his privileged upbringing has been detrimental to his career in British entertainment. In the piece, he blames inverse snobbery for the BBC initially spurning Armstrong and Miller after their big break on the Edinburgh fringe in the mid-1990s. And, he adds, "I'm not anticipating an offer to
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Alexander Armstrong hits back at 'tribal aversion' to posh comics

Armstrong and Miller comic lambasts 'inverse snobbery' while Ricky Gervais teaches guitar – and who's the hottest comedian?

This week's comedy news

We begin with the Telegraph's tale of Alexander Armstrong and the apparent victimisation of "posh" comics. "Why should your background be held against you?," asks the descendant of William the Conqueror, alumnus of a Durham public school and director of a production company called Toff Media. "It is so short-sighted … This tribal aversion to anyone with a posh voice is very boring." Armstrong – best known as one half of the sketch double-act Armstrong and Miller – even lodges the improbable complaint that his privileged upbringing has been detrimental to his career in British entertainment. In the piece, he blames inverse snobbery for the BBC initially spurning Armstrong and Miller after their big break on the Edinburgh fringe in the mid-1990s. And, he adds, "I'm not anticipating an offer to
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Just Good Friends – box set review

Vince and Penny's on again/off again relationship is that rare thing – an 80s sitcom that hasn't aged badly

Sitcoms can age badly, perhaps worse than any other type of TV show. What had millions of viewers laughing like drains in the 70s and 80s is often met with stoney-faced silence these days, the hairstyles and clothes generating more laughs than the actual gags. John Sullivan's 1983 hit sitcom Just Good Friends bucks this trend; it even seems quite modern today. It doesn't go hard after laughs, the pace is deliberate rather than desperate, the sit is given just as much importance as the com. Plus, in leads Jan Francis and Paul Nicholas, it has something age cannot wither: chemistry.

The set-up is simple: charming Jack-the-lad turf accountant wanders back into the life of advertising secretary Penny Warrender, having jilted her at the altar five years previously. There's still some spark between them.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Acorn Media July DVDs: Ghosts, Gadgets and Addiction

  • bestbritishtv
James May's 20th Century

Kieran Kinsella

Fans of BBC America’s Top Gear will enjoy Athena’s July 17th release of James May’s 20th Century. The 300 minute DVD box set includes all six episodes of the popular TV host’s show about the most memorable inventions of the last century. Unlike his Top Gear co-hosts, May is a universally liked fellow who can talk about powerful engines, fast cars and aerodynamics without offending anyone or causing viewers to fall asleep.

In this set of episodes, May gets to test drive everything from a lunar buggy to fighter planes. He looks a little like a washed up hippie but he has a childlike enthusiasm for the subject. His energy and exuberance make the show hard to resist. The really great thing about this gadget-centric show is that May recounts the technological developments of the last century in a way that
See full article at bestbritishtv »

Classic British TV Series Being Streamed By Acorn TV

  • CinemaRetro
Cinema Retro has received the following press release:

The leading ‘Best British TV’ streaming service Acorn TV is now streaming full seasons of several popular British mystery and drama series, along with two critically acclaimed Canadian series. This week Acorn TV also has a special Memorial Day Weekend Midsomer Marathon with the first 22 episodes of its best-selling series,Midsomer Murders, and the U.S. debut of John Nettles final episodes.

Acorn TV is currently streaming a full season of Helen Mirren in Prime Suspect; the final seasons of the universally acclaimed Canadian dramedy Slings & ARROWSand Derek Jacobi’s mystery series Cadfael; the U.S. debut of the newest season of Murdoch Mysteries; Lynda La Plante’s Trial & Retribution; John Mortimer’s Under The Hammer; the final episodes of WWII drama Wish Me Luck; Richard Griffiths (Harry Potter) in Pie In The Sky; and John Nettles final episodes with Midsomer Murders,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Six to watch: small-screen romcoms

Happy Endings and Perfect Couples are identikit Friends-style sitcoms. We look at the best of the genre but have missed any?

Tonight not one but two new Us sitcoms step forward in an effort to fill the Friends-shaped void that's been left in E4's schedules. Happy Endings and Perfect Couples are a product of the Us networks' recent fascination with romcoms. Look beyond the subtle differences – one sports an uncomfortably suggestive title, while the other has already been cancelled – and there's not too much to separate two cookie-cutter comedies. In fact Happy Endings and Perfect Couples are so similar you could probably switch the characters, jokes and storylines of both shows without noticing much of a difference.

So what are the must-see sights on a tour of tellyland's finest romcoms? Join us as we separate the Hugh Grants from the Hugh Hefners in our run down of the six best.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Tonight's TV highlights: The Comedy Genius of John Sullivan | The Graham Norton Show | PhoneShop | Invaders – Giant Swamp Rats | In Treatment | Once Upon a Time in New York

  • The Guardian - TV News
The Comedy Genius of John Sullivan | The Graham Norton Show | PhoneShop | Invaders – Giant Swamp Rats | In Treatment | Once Upon a Time in New York

The Comedy Genius of John Sullivan

8.30pm, BBC1

On 23 April, following a short illness, comedy writer John Sullivan died, aged 64. As this tribute will presumably explore (there was minimal information available as we went to press) he left behind an extraordinary body of work, including Citizen Smith and Just Good Friends. Most famously of all, he created Only Fools and Horses, a show that paradoxically it's rather too easy to take for granted because of its success. Better to remember that sitcoms don't become as much a part of the national consciousness as the adventures of Del and Rodney without tapping into some deeper truth. Jonathan Wright

The Graham Norton Show

10.35pm, BBC1

Poor old Lady Gaga. It wasn't all plain sailing with her comeback single,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

John Sullivan obituary

Creator of TV sitcoms such as Only Fools and Horses and Citizen Smith that became national institutions

According to various polls, Only Fools and Horses is the most popular UK sitcom of all time. Its author, John Sullivan, who has died aged 64, after a bout of viral pneumonia, once said "I'll never kill off Del Boy while the public still loves him," and even after the series officially ended in 1991, he kept writing further episodes and "specials" for 20 years.

The history of British broadcasting is rich with Dickensian television comedy writing rooted in lower-middle and working-class lives. Johnny Speight created the loudmouthed bigot Alf Garnett; Galton and Simpson came up with Steptoe and Son, the warring rag-and-bone merchants; and Sullivan gave us the Peckham wheeler-dealer Derek "Del Boy" Trotter. Del Boy, with ludicrous aspirations of amassing great wealth, and as played by David Jason, was Sullivan's favourite creation.

As the son of an Irish plumber,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Can you be just good friends?

For Kathryn Flett, friendships with men have always been clear-cut. Well, mostly …

Can men and women ever be just good friends? It was a question posed most recently in an amusing article on the current affairs magazine slate.com, despite being slightly older than time itself – older, even, than When Harry Met Sally or John Sullivan's amusing 1980s sitcom Just Good Friends, which starred Paul Nicholas as Vincent and Jan Francis as Penny.

For readers who may have forgotten – or who weren't born – the Jgf back-story was that Vince had jilted Pen at the altar five years previously, then, after bumping into each other in a pub, they attempted to turn their former love and steaming chemistry into a modern platonic friendship, albeit of a sort Plato may not have recognised.

Inevitably, after 22 episodes over three series, including a Christmas special, Vince and Pen finally got married, thus satisfying
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Sex, Lies and Decoding Hollywood-Speak

By Stacy Jenel Smith

hollywoodnews.com: When Jimmy Kimmel served as master of ceremonies at the Publicists Guild Luncheon a few years back, he set the mood by asking the crowd in the Beverly Hilton Hotel ballroom to join him in saying grace, and proceeded to lead them in a prayer asking forgiveness for “all the lies we told to Us Weekly last year, and those we will tell this year.”

Yes, of all occupations, celebrity publicists may now actually occupy the lowest rung on the veracity ladder. Thank goodness for the brave public relations professionals who try to play it as straight as possible with the community at large and with the press, but others, well, they brought this detestable designation on themselves. We’re talking about the sort of folks who can say with a straight face that Whitney Houston played air piano and muttered bizarre statements throughout
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Can Married Single Other restore ITV's reputation for relationship dramas?

It has much in common with Cold Feet, Sex and the City et al – and ITV will hope Single Married Other mirrors their success

ITV has recently become quite good at producing both must-see talent competitions and TV shows about Robson Green going for a bit of a swim. However, it's done so at the expense of something it used to be great at – the contemporary relationship drama.

As a way of attempting to even that up, tonight ITV premieres Married Single Other – the much-trailed new comedy drama starring Ralf Little and Lucy Davis among others. They're calling it the new Cold Feet, which would at first seem like a fair assumption, given that the show shares the same executive producer and director, and that the subject matter is exactly the same. But in reality it's a slightly unfair comparison – these types of shows are undoubtedly products of their time.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

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