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Fire and Ice (1983)

At the end of the ice age, an evil queen and her son are set on conquering the world using magic and warriors. The lone survivor of a crushed village fights back as does the king of Fire Keep.

Writers:

Ralph Bakshi (characters created by), Frank Frazetta (characters created by) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Randy Norton Randy Norton ... Larn
Cynthia Leake ... Teegra
Steve Sandor ... Darkwolf
Sean Hannon ... Nekron
Leo Gordon ... Jarol
William Ostrander ... Taro / Larn (voice)
Eileen O'Neill Eileen O'Neill ... Juliana
Elizabeth Lloyd Shaw Elizabeth Lloyd Shaw ... Roleil
Micky Morton Micky Morton ... Otwa
Tamarah Park Tamarah Park ... Tutor
Big Yank Big Yank ... Monga
Greg Wayne Elam Greg Wayne Elam ... Pako (as Greg Elam)
Jimmy Bridges ... Subhuman (as James Bridges)
Shane Callan Shane Callan ... Subhuman
Archie Hamilton Archie Hamilton ... Subhuman
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Storyline

From their stronghold in Icepeak, the evil Queen Juliana (Eileen O'Neill) and her son, Nekron (Stephen Mendel), send forth a wave of glaciers, forcing humanity to retreat south towards the equator. Nekron sends a delegation to King Jarol ( Leo Gordon) in Firekeep to request his surrender, but this is a ruse orchestrated by Queen Juliana for Nekron's sub-humans to kidnap Jarol's bikini-clad daughter, Princess Teegra (Cynthia Leake); Queen Juliana feels that Nekron should take a bride to produce an heir. However, Nekron is incensed and rejects the notion of peace, Teegra and his mother's plan. Later, Teegra makes an escape and comes upon Larn (Randy Norton), a young warrior and the only survivor of a village razed by glaciers, who offers to escort her back to Firekeep. As Teegra is recaptured, Larn teams with the mysterious Darkwolf ( Steve Sandor) to save Teegra and then travel to Icepeak to stop Juliana. Darkwolf faces Nekron and kills him as Icepeak succumbs to lava released by King ... Written by Mohammed Salman Khan

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The end of mankind as we know it. See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

26 August 1983 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Fuego y hielo See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,200,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$263,238, 28 August 1983

Gross USA:

$760,883
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Stereo (L-R)| Dolby Digital EX (DVD version)| DTS-ES (DVD version)| Dolby (Dolby TrueHD 7.1)| DTS (DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

4:3 Full Frame
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The stuntmen who played the subhumans found working with Frank Frazetta to be quite frustrating because he gave them very specific instructions on how to move. See more »

Goofs

Darkwolf rescues Larn from Nekron's iceberg, then both head to Fire Keep. They proceed to convince Jarol to lend him the Dragonhawks so they can return to the glacier to rescue Teegra and kill Nekron. Why didn't they simply infiltrate the glacier while they were still there? After all, Larn got close enough to fire an arrow at Nekron. Darkwolf could have killed him there, instead of wasting time heading back to Fire Keep. See more »

Quotes

Larn: Not so close, you'll burn it.
Teegra: I've always lived close to a fire.
See more »

Connections

References Heavy Metal (1981) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Worth a spin in the DVD player
11 June 2004 | by oshram-3See all my reviews

When I was a lot younger and 'traditional hand-drawn animation,' to quote Mr. Eisner, wasn't dead, I was a fan of Ralph Bakshi. Sort of the anti-Disney, Bakshi did counter-culture movies like Fritz the Cat (which Robert Crumb hated so much he subsequently killed off the character), Wizards (a midnight movie staple for years), and the unfortunately named Coonskin, which was nearly incomprehensible. Bakshi was a sort of cultural renegade, offering up in animation what no one else could – basically, he made animated films for adults – and following his own warped vision of how things should be. Probably his highest profile work was his 1978 version of Lord of the Rings, a movie I still enjoy to this day. Problem is, aside from Rings, none of Bakshi's films ever made any money, and an attempt to go commercial with 1981's American Pop fizzled (granted, it was an uneven film). Bakshi returned to the genre that he'd done the best with – swords and sorcery – for 1983's Fire and Ice. 70s megastar artist Frank Frazetta designed most of the characters and did a fair amount of pre-production art (some of which, in true Bakshi fashion, shows up in montages in the film). It was a teaming up of the greatest fantasy artist if the day and the only animator who could have brought his stuff to life with any accuracy. The film was scripted by Roy Thomas, famous for working on Marvel Comics' Conan series, and Gerry Conway, another comics writer. That's a lot of genre talent for a small animated film.

Fire and Ice is no classic. It probably marks the pinnacle of rotoscoping and is a beautifully rendered film. There's a scant excuse for a plot and the characters are wafer thin, but the joy of the film is in the design and animation. This one really is eye candy, and I don't know if any of those involved with its creation ever aimed higher than making an animated Frazetta painting. Certainly they achieved that in spades.

Fire and Ice is achingly simple in its set up. Evil Ice Lord Nekron (a Bakshi staple name, used previously in Wizards) uses his magic powers to crush his enemies with a rapidly moving glacier. He also has a bunch of orcs (call them what they are) at his command who wipe out anyone who dodges the ice. Next up on his deep freeze: Fire Keep, run by King Jerol, who controls the lava, etc. The story centers mostly around a young man named Larn, the stereotypical hottie boy with long hair who runs around in a loincloth. After his village is iced, Larn encounters Jerol's ample daughter, Teegra, a Frazetta gal if ever there were one; body by Pamela Anderson, wardrobe by Frederick's of Hollywood. Aside from the pretty pictures, this would have been a forgettable flick if not for the presence of Dark Wolf, a mysterious warrior who's part Batman, part Superman, and all bad-ass. Dark Wolf's fun to watch, and he elevates the movie into the realm of the watchable.

The dialogue is pretty bad and the story is cliché-ridden, but Fire and Ice is still fun in a dopey kind of way. Some of the elements could have made a decent fantasy pulp novel, and a lot of the designs are pretty neat. Bakshi made better films than this (Wizards, Rings) but he made worse, too (most of the rest of his stuff). I wouldn't recommend this for anyone other than Bakshi fans or animation die-hards, or someone who really likes the fantasy genre. But it's light, brainless fun, and in my mind deserves not to be forgotten to the dustbin of obscurity.

June 8, 2004


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