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Bolero (1984) Poster

(1984)

Trivia

Olivia d'Abo, who was 14 at the time, appeared nude in several scenes.
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This film was the final nail in the coffin of The Cannon Group, Inc. and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer deal that saw MGM distribute all of Cannon's films in the U.S.
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It was widely rumored in the media at the time of the film's release that the final love scene wasn't simulated.
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Rather than allow the film to be released with an X-rating, John Derek chose to release the film unrated instead. According to Wikipedia, "Bolero (1984) was released with no MPAA rating. Its nudity and sexual content disqualified it from an R rating. At the time of release, the NC-17 rating had not yet been established and the only higher rating being X, John Derek decided to release the film unrated. The film is officially on DVD with an R rating with no cuts."
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The movie was nominated for Nine Golden Raspberry Awards including Worst New Star, Worst Supporting Actor, and Worst Supporting Actress. In the end, the film won a sizable Six Razzies which were for Worst Actress, Worst Director, Worst New Star, Worst Screenplay, Worst Musical Score and the most notorious one of all: Worst Picture. In 1990, this movie was also nominated for The Golden Raspberry "Razzie" Award for Worst Picture of the Decade.
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After a meeting in The Cannon Group, Inc. offices, Bo Derek had her luggage ransacked as she was about to travel, and had her personal pictures from the set of the film stolen. She was appalled to see that they were used and promoted as advertising for the film soon after they appeared in Variety when the film was being released, and was very upset about it.
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According to Bo Derek, Producers Menahem Golan and Yoram Globus were so disappointed with the film, that they threatened to take away the Derek's family ranch, in a ploy to distance themselves from the controversy of the film.
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The picture was nominated for Worst Picture at the Hastings Bad Cinema Society's 7th Stinkers Bad Movie Awards in 1984.
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In an article by Scot Haller in the September 3, 1984 edition of People Magazine, it stated that the movie had in the U.S. (at the time) "probably the widest release of any no-one-under-17-admitted movie in Hollywood history."
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After receiving a memo from Menahem Golan to spice up the film even further, Bo Derek consulted with MGM head Frank Yablans about making additions as they were screening the film for the studio to distribute. Yablans still called the film junk like many of Cannon's productions, which they were giving MGM to release as part of their deal, which the studio used a "breach of contract" clause to get out of, as of November 7, 1984.
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The movie's title was inspired by two sources, the first was the name of the film's star, sex symbol Bo Derek, and the fact that the major sex scene in Blake Edwards' 10 (1979), which had co-starred Bo Derek, was choreographed to the score of Maurice Ravel's classic music piece "Bolero" (1928).
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According to Bo Derek, Producer Menahem Golan would send her and John Derek memos to make the film more "erotic". Derek would state that the film "was already erotic" enough.
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Producer Menahem Golan once reported that General Cinema, the largest theater chain in the U.S. at the time, refused to screen this movie.
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This movie was estimated to only need to gross twenty million dollars in order to break even.
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Penultimate movie directed by John Derek. Ghosts Can't Do It (1989) was his last.
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For the horseback bullfighting scenes, the stars were doubled by brothers Ángel Peralta (Derek) and Rafael Peralta (Occhipinti).
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Fabio Testi was originally cast as Angel, but after several weeks was replaced, reportedly over a medical condition affecting his face. Several weeks' filming were refilmed.
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According to Menahem Golan, the home video rights sold for $1.5 million.
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John Derek once said of this film and the questions of pre-release sneak preview screenings: "I have made the film I wanted to make. I'm not going to take it to the public for (early) screenings."
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A heavily censored version of the film aired as the midday movie on Channel 7 in Australia in 1993.
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Greg Bensen and Olivia d'Abo received "introducing" credits.
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Reportedly, Writer and Director John Derek had contractual final cut say rights over the picture.
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Prior to this movie's theatrical release, an industry executive once said of this film to People Magazine: "Says one studio Vice President, 'If it's a bomb, we can all applaud the fact that we don't have to talk to them. But Bo (Derek) is still a name, and she will still get financing. No one is too much trouble if they've just come off a hit."
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According to Wikipedia, "Bolero (1984) was the film that dissolved the distribution deal between Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, then known as MGM/UA Communications, and Cannon Films, over the potentially X-rated material in the film. MGM then had a rule of not releasing X-rated material theatrically. Cannon parted ways with MGM shortly before the release of Bolero (1984), and Cannon again became an in-house film production and distribution company."
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The love scene in 10 (1979) was set to Ravel's melody score "Boléro" (1928). According to Wikipedia, "Boléro is a one-movement orchestral piece by Maurice Ravel (1875-1937). Originally composed as a ballet commissioned by Russian actress and dancer Ida Rubinstein, the piece, which premiered in 1928, is Ravel's most famous musical composition."
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One of four movie collaborations of Bo Derek and John Derek. The others being Fantasies (1981), Ghosts Can't Do It (1989), and Tarzan the Ape Man (1981).
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The movie was released three years after another film called "Bolero", French Director Claude Lelouch's Bolero (1981).
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The picture frequently utilized title cards evocative of the style used in silent movies as to represent the 1920s era which influenced the film's storyline.
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This movie represents the final (to date, February 2018) movie with Bo Derek in a leading role.
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The nickname of Ayre McGillvary (Bo Derek) was "Mac".
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Bo Derek performed two roles on the film, being its star and Producer. Her husband John Derek performed three roles on this movie. He was the Writer, Director, and Director of Photography.
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Writer, Director, and Director of Photography John Derek and Bo Derek were married until his death in 1998.
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