Screen Two (1985–2002)
7.4/10
141
3 user

Hotel du Lac 

An authoress, whose career is more successful than her private life, arrives at a Swiss hotel and finds her life changing in unexpected ways.

Director:

Giles Foster
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Anna Massey ... Edith Hope
Denholm Elliott ... Philip Neville
Googie Withers ... Mrs. Pusey
Julia McKenzie ... Jennifer Pusey
Patricia Hodge ... Monica
Irene Handl ... Madame de Bonneuil
Barry Foster ... David Simmonds
Ann Firbank ... Penelope Milne
Geoffrey Chater ... Harold Webb
Jeffry Wickham Jeffry Wickham ... Geoffrey Long (as Jeffrey Wickham)
Maurice Travail Maurice Travail ... Hotel Proprietor
Jean-Marc Barr ... Alain
Patsy Byrne Patsy Byrne ... Mrs. Dempster
Andree Evans Andree Evans ... Hostess
Colette Gleeson Colette Gleeson ... Priscilla
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Storyline

An authoress, whose career is more successful than her private life, arrives at a Swiss hotel and finds her life changing in unexpected ways.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

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Details

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

2 March 1986 (UK) See more »

Filming Locations:

London, England, UK See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This was the last time Irene Handl and Julia McKenzie worked together on TV. See more »

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User Reviews

 
A perfectly pitched film of loneliness and failed escape
16 May 1999 | by snauntonSee all my reviews

It's a while since I saw it, but this fine film demands someone's comment. Edith Hope (Massey) attempts exile from a failing affair, and from her loneliness, in that quintessential place of exile, a Swiss lakeside hotel. But the other residents, ridiculous and sad, only compound her isolation, revealing the emptiness of disengagement. Flashbacks to her affair in London have a colour and vibrancy that startle in their contrast with Hope's melancholy quiet in Switzerland. Hope must return, without hope, and face the reality of her life in England, no matter how painful. The acting is immaculate: Massey plain and still, passion hidden deep within her; Elliott in a typical role of wise counsel; Julia McKenzie as the absurd lubricious vulgarian, they and the rest of the cast all deliver perfectly pitched performances. Quiet and introverted, accurately reflecting Anita Brookner's novel, this is a very English film and about as good as an English film gets.


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