Camille Claudel (1988) - News Poster

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Pretty When You Cry: Isabelle Adjani's Tragic Heroines

  • MUBI
Camille ClaudelIt seems impossible to talk about Isabelle Adjani without mentioning her eyes. Round, blue, and prone to tears, Adjani’s eyes are filled with a heartbreaking expressiveness reminiscent of the actresses of the silent film era. A series collecting some of Adjani’s most memorable performances, now playing at New York’s French Institute Alliance Française, is titled (obviously) “Magnetic Gaze.” The 10-film series offers a sampling of her work, from her breakthrough as the title character in François Truffaut’s The Story of Adèle H. (1975), a haunting portrait of l’amour fou, to her most recent role in—of all things—an action comedy, Romain Gavras’s The World is Yours (2018). Adjani is extra. She works a close-up with an intensity few actresses can surpass. When she tears up, so do we. While “Magnetic Gaze” is missing some canonical Adjani films the collection here shows the actress at her most emotionally volatile.
See full article at MUBI »

Cannes In Progress — 2nd of 3

Cannes In Progress — 2nd of 3
As we pass the halfway mark, several new developments of the Cannes International Film Festival seem to have more importance in some ways than the traditional Films in Competition which so far are “interesting” if lacking a bit in luster…

A jury of international critics gathered together by the top international trade paper, Screen International, keeps its own score of the 20 Competition Films as does Film Francais whose critics are all French. Thus far 13 have screened and on a scale of 4 (Excellent) to 0 (Bad), Screen’s highest scoring film so far is 3.2 for the French-Russian coproduction “Loveless” about a bitterly out-of-love couple going through a divorce who must team up to find their son who has disappeared during one of their brutal arguments. Directed by Andrey Zvyagintsev and funded independently because the Russian government so disliked his 2014 Competition Film, “Leviathan” ( for which it had put up 35% of the funding), that
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

Cannes Review: ‘Rodin’ Doesn’t Do Justice to a Great Artist

It’s one thing to make a movie about an artist and his art; it is a whole other thing to make a movie about an artist mostly just doing his art. That is the central focus of Rodin, a film concerning the famed sculptor Auguste Rodin (Vincent Lindon) that all but sucks away the drama in favor of scenes of the artist creating his work. Some of these sequences do in fact work, especially when director Jacques Doillon is trying to recreate the time period when Rodin was struggling to make the sculpture of Balzac. Authorities aren’t happy that he has painted him as an overweight figure, which he was, and demand a skinnier version. The eureka moment is his ingenious idea of plastering a robe on the statue. It’s the film’s finest scene, making one feel as if they were in the room that day when that time-capsule-worthy moment happened.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Sociopsychological Drama with Central Gay Character, French Film Icon Top Nsfc Choices

2016 movies Things to Come (pictured) and Elle have earned French cinema icon Isabelle Huppert her – surprisingly – first National Society of Film Critics Best Actress Award. 2016 Movies: Isabelle Huppert & 'Moonlight' among National Society of Film Critics' top picks Earlier today (Jan. 7), the National Society of Film Critics announced their top 2016 movies and performances. Somewhat surprisingly, this year's Nsfc list – which generally contains more offbeat entries than those of other U.S.-based critics groups – is quite similar to their counterparts', most of which came out last December. No, that doesn't mean the National Society of Film Critics has opted for the crowd-pleasing route. Instead, this awards season U.S. critics have not infrequently gone for even less mainstream entries than usual. Examples, among either the Nsfc winners or runners-up, include Isabelle Huppert in Elle, Moonlight, Toni Erdmann, Casey Affleck in Manchester by the Sea, and Lily Gladstone in Certain Women. French
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Everybody Runs: An Interview with Louis Garrel

  • MUBI
Two FriendsThough known primarily as an actor, Louis Garrel has been conducting appreciable efforts behind the camera as well. After directing three short films, including a César-nominated Petit tailleur, and most recently La règle de trois, Louis Garrel expands upon his fascination of threes with his first feature length film, Two Friends (Les deux amis), in which he also stars. Based loosely on the French play The Moods of Marianne, Garrel's film finds professional movie extra Vincent (Vincent Macaigne) in frenzied love with Mona (Goldshifteh Farahani), who cannot and will not give in to his romantic advances due in part to her restrictive situation, which she keeps secret. She works behind a pastry counter by day, but every evening must return to prison for curfew, not unlike an incarcerated Cinderella. Vincent enlists his best friend, the caddish Abel (Louis Garrel), to help win her over or at least understand her cooling passion.
See full article at MUBI »

The Story of Adèle H. | Blu-ray Review

You no doubt know of a crazy local or two that mills around your town in a daze, occasionally causing disturbances, but otherwise remains fairly harmless. If you stop to think about it, it’s possible that they may have had an entirely different life with a past rich with fame, fortune and family, but sadly, their final warped reality is often the result of something as tragic as mental illness. In the case of François Truffaut‘s true to life telling of French literary master Victor Hugo’s increasingly demented daughter’s obsessive breakdown in The Story of Adèle H., the vagabond fate stems from haughty infatuation and swiftly disintegrates into detached delirium not unlike those familiar empty faces asking for bus fare or something to eat on your local street corner.

The Story of Adèle H. followed Truffaut’s Best Foreign Picture winning Day For Night, gleaning its
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Acting Oscar Nominations for Foreign-Language Performances

By Anjelica Oswald

Managing Editor

With the addition of Marion Cotillard’s lead actress nomination for the Belgian film Two Days, One Night, 32 actors and actresses have been nominated for their performances in foreign-language films. Cotillard was nominated for her role as a young mother and wife struggling to salvage her job in Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardennes’ film, which was chosen as Belgium’s submission to the foreign-language category but failed to secure a spot on the Oscar shortist.

Though her performance did land a Critics’ Choice Award nomination, the Oscar nomination did come as a surprise for many pundits.

Cotillard was previously nominated for the French foreign-language film La Vie En Rose (2007) and won. She is one of six actors or actresses to win for a non-English role and is also the most recent winner.

The first acting nomination for a foreign-language performance went to Sophia Loren in 1962 for
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Queen Margot | Blu-Ray Review

Arguably the most prolific title in director Patrice Chereau’s three decades of filmmaking, Cohen Media Group releases a beautiful remastering of Queen Margot for its twentieth anniversary. Chereau, who died at the age of 68 in late 2013, participated in the restoration, which is the definitive director’s cut that includes an additional twenty minutes that had been cut out of the film’s 1994 theatrical release. Smack dab in the middle of his filmography, it’s his most lavish and ambitious production, recreating the savage beauty of 16th century France, based on Alexandre Dumas’ novel, concerning a passionate romance torn asunder by a people consumed with religious minded self-righteousness. The 2013 remastering played in Cannes Classics that year, while the film originally won the Jury Prize at Cannes in 1994, the Clint Eastwood presiding jury also awarding Virna Lisi the Best Actress prize.

In 1572 France, a break in the bloody war between Catholics
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Camille Claudel, 1915 | DVD Review

Many are perhaps familiar with Isabelle Adjani’s much hailed Oscar nominated performance as the turn of the century French sculptress Camille Claudel in the 1988 Bruno Nuytten sensation, an artist whose unfortunate demise overshadowed her work. When director Bruno Dumont announced his latest film, Camille Claudel, 1915, (a 2013 Berlin Film Festival entry) which would mark the first time the auteur utilizes a notable actor, here in the form of Juliette Binoche, it marked an intriguing change of pace for a director known for oblique and sometimes distractingly philosophical works where the sacred and profane seethe incongruously until sparks of surprising violence puncture the ambiance.

What’s perhaps more surprising is Dumont’s end result here, an elegiac look at a brief moment in time where Claudel was only two years into a nearly thirty year internment in an insane asylum. Without a doubt, the success lies primarily with a formidable performance from Binoche,
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Scream Factory Brings Werner Herzog's Nosferatu the Vampyre to Blu-ray

Hailed as one of the more interesting takes on the classic story of Dracula, Werner Herzog's Nosferatu the Vampyre is a perfect fit for a company like Scream Factory, which is all about giving proper recognition to films that may have slipped under the radar of fans over the years.

Sink your teeth into the details about this upcoming Blu-ray release!

From the Press Release

Since its release in 1979, Wener Herzog’s Nosferatu the Vampyre has not only become one of the director’s most acclaimed films, but one of the most compelling and visually-striking interpretations of the Dracula story ever committed to film. In his haunting interpretation of F.W. Murnau’s 1922 classic, Herzog eschews the popular conception of the vampire as confident and alluring, and instead focuses on the tragedy of the creature: doomed to immortality, weary, and disgusted at his own existence. A must for both cinephiles and horror fans alike,
See full article at Dread Central »

Werner Herzog’s Nosferatu Blu-ray Release Details

  • DailyDead
We previously reported that Wener Herzog’s Nosferatu the Vampyre was getting a high-def upgrade from Scream Factory and we’re back with the official release date, a list of bonus features, and a look at the cover art:

“Since its release in 1979, Wener Herzog’s Nosferatu the Vampyre has not only become one of the director’s most acclaimed films, but one of the most compelling and visually-striking interpretations of the Dracula story ever committed to film. In his haunting interpretation of F.W. Murnau’s 1922 classic, Herzog eschews the popular conception of the vampire as confident and alluring, and instead focuses on the tragedy of the creature: doomed to immortality, weary, and disgusted at his own existence. A must for both cinephiles and horror-fans alike, the award-winning Nosferatu the Vampyre makes its Blu-ray debut on May 20th, 2014 from Shout! Factory.

Starring Klaus Kinski, Isabelle Adjani (Camille Claudel, Possession) and Bruno Ganz,
See full article at DailyDead »

Interview: Juliette Binoche On 'Sils Maria,' The Career/Life Balance & Finally Going Hollywood In 'Godzilla'

When revered Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami cancelled his attendance at the Marrakech Film Festival due to ill health, the organizers could have had a further problem on their hands as he was meant, in addition to giving a masterclass, to be handing out the award at one of the “Hommages”—the tributes given to a filmmaker or actor in recognition of their body of work. However, that one headache didn’t occur here because the recipient was Juliette Binoche, practically the busiest actress on the planet, and Bruno Dumont, her director in this year’s “Camille Claudel” and himself the subject of a Marrakech masterclass, stepped into the breach instead. It’s a mark of just how constantly she is shooting, and with what calibre of filmmaker, that, throw a stone at a festival like this, and you’ll hit two or three people who have worked with Binoche, and probably recently.
See full article at The Playlist »

Marrakech Film Festival Masterclass: Bruno Dumont Gives Tips on Editing, Directing Actors and More

Marrakech Film Festival Masterclass: Bruno Dumont Gives Tips on Editing, Directing Actors and More
Six weeks after his latest film, "Camille Claudel 1915," received a theatrical release in the U.S., and just a few days after John Waters listed that and another of his films ("Hors Satan") on his 2013 Top 10 list for Artforum, Bruno Dumont was given the royal treatment at the 13th annual Marrakech Film Festival, an opulent feast of cinema presided over by none other than His Royal Highness Prince Moulay Rachid. On Saturday night, Dumont walked the red carpet before introducing and honoring his collaborator on "Camille Claudel," Juliette Binoche, as part of the festival's nightly "Tributes" series (the previous night's recipient was Sharon Stone); then on Sunday afternoon he sat down for a master class at the Palais des Congress. Though Waters dubbed Dumont "the ultimate master of cinematic misery," in his 90-minute conversation with Cahiers du Cinema critic Jean-Philippe Tessé, the blue-eyed brooder was animated and forthcoming, and
See full article at Indiewire »

Sharon Stone and Juliette Binoche to be Honored at Marrakech International Film Festival

  • Indiewire
Sharon Stone and Juliette Binoche to be Honored at Marrakech International Film Festival
Morocco is set to get an injection of international glamour, as THR just announced that Sharon Stone and Juliette Binoche will be honored at the Marrakech International Film Festival, receiving career tributes when it kicks off at the end of the month. This comes off the heels of a great year on screen for the actresses, with Stone garnering praise for her intense role as porn star Linda Lovelace's mother in "Lovelace" and Binoche as French artist Camille Claudel in "Camille Claudel, 1915." Japanese director Hirokazu Kor-eda and Argentine director Fernando Solanas will also be honored at the festival, which runs from November 29 to December 7.  Now in its 13th year, the Marrakech International Film Festival has grown in size and star power, with Martin Scorsese, Marion Cotillard and Patricia Clarkson having already been announced as jury members of this year's edition. Other attendees set to be at the festival include Noomi Rapace,
See full article at Indiewire »

Capsule Movie Reviews (Oct. 16): 'Kill Your Darlings' and six more

New Release

Kill Your Darlings

R, 1 Hr., 40 Mins.

This shocking drama about the earliest days of the Beats is the rare art biopic that sees the dark roots of creativity. In 1943, Allen Ginsberg (Daniel Radcliffe) enters Columbia University and is drawn into the orbit of the floridly brilliant and damaged Lucien Carr (Dane DeHaan). Radcliffe, in a superb performance, captures Ginsberg’s playfully stern poetic passion, Ben Foster nails the aristocratic young rotter William Burroughs, and DeHaan is inspired as a bohemian-turned-killer. A- —Owen Gleiberman

As I Lay Dying

R, 1 Hr., 49 Mins.

James Franco directed this adaptation of the William Faulkner novel,
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Camille Claudel 1915: A Thorny Art House Portrayal of the Sculptor's Life

Camille Claudel 1915: A Thorny Art House Portrayal of the Sculptor's Life
Body-carving his own Dreyerian passage among modern French art-film provocateurs, Bruno Dumont now augments his catalogue of unstable heroines with Camille Claudel, famed sculptress and rebellious lover of Rodin, who was committed to an asylum by her conservative family in 1913 and remained confined until she died 30 years later. No stranger to strung-out feminist outrage, Juliette Binoche grips the edge-of-madness title role with bony white hands, and, at first, Dumont's movie seems to be no more than the actress's austere showcase, as Claudel is surrounded by nuns and fellow patients, and chafes at her hopeless imprisonment to the detriment of her weakening sanity. But the rebel-yell flourish here is Dumont's decision to populate the madhouse with authentic French psychotics ...
See full article at Village Voice »

Review: Camille Claudel 1915, Austere Examination of Woman Under The Influence And Faith

With each new film, a controversial French filmmaker Bruno Dumont continues to fascinate me. His fixation with purity is quite unflinching, and his characters suffer for (or for the lack of) it. Camille Claudel 1915, an even more characteristically stripped-down, austere Dumont film, concerns 3 days in the life of Camille Claudel, a famed sculptress and one time August Rodin's mistress. She has been abandoned and committed by her family to a mental asylum where she would spend the rest of her life until death. Her younger brother Paul, a famous poet and writer with a strong Christian bent visits her during this time, not to rescue her, but ends up chastising her.Juliette Binoche, who continues to choose intriguing projects as she gets older, plays...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Camille Claudel, 1915 | Review

Snake Pit Soliloquy: Dumont’s Brief Vignette Profoundly Effective

Many are perhaps familiar with Isabelle Adjani’s much hailed Oscar nominated performance as the turn of the century French sculptress Camille Claudel in the 1988 Bruno Nuytten sensation, an artist whose unfortunate demise overshadowed her work. When director Bruno Dumont announced his latest film, Camille Claudel, 1915, which would mark the first time the auteur utilizes a notable actor, here in the form of Juliette Binoche, it marked an intriguing change of pace for a director known for oblique and sometimes distractingly philosophical works where the sacred and profane seethe incongruously until sparks of surprising violence puncture the ambiance. What’s perhaps more surprising is Dumont’s end result here, an elegiac look at a brief moment in time where Claudel was only two years into a nearly thirty year internment in an insane asylum. Without a doubt, the success lies primarily
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Top 3 Critic’s Picks In Theaters this October: Blue Is the Warmest Color, A Touch of Sin & Gravity

This October we’ve got a handful of gems from Sundance in indie dramatic items such as Stacie Passon’s Concussion, Matthew Porterfield’s I Used to Be Darker (both open this Friday) and John KrokidasKill Your Darlings (October 18th) and docs such as Joe Brewster & Michele Stephenson’s American Promise and Steve Hoover’s Blood Brother (both Oct.18th). We’ve got a formidable piece that played in Berlin with Bruno Dumont’s Camille Claudel, 1915 (October 16th) but what makes October an exceptional month, is that we have four bonafide, almost unheard of gold star items. We trimmed a future Oscar nominee just waiting to collect its loot in Steve McQueen’s 12 Years a Slave (October 18th) – which is being touted as the best of his early career and was graded with a rare, perfect score on our site. Here are this month’s Top 3 Critic’s Picks!
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Kino Lorber: One of the Most Interesting Us Distributors

At Locarno recently, of all places, I sat down with NYC buddy and one of my favorite film people and Us distributor Kino Lorber's head honcho Richard Lorber.

As always he has an amazing lineup. Richard likes art films and intelligent subject matters. He also distributes many documentaries and non English language films. Very good taste I might add.

He bought the controversial Chinese film shown at Cannes this year, A Touch Of Sin.

It begins shockingly as it opens with a punchy bout of bloodshed as three kids brandishing hatchets hold up passing motorcyclist Zhou San (Wang Baoqiang) on a stretch of lonely road. But they are foiled when he calmly pulls out a gun and dispatches them. That drifter, with his taste for firearms and robbery, resurfaces later in one of the film’s four narrative strands.

At Cannes it won Best Screenplay. Kino Lorber will open this in 50 Us cities and in New York at the prestigious IFC Center, in Greenwich Village on 6th Avenue.

Richard will soon open theatrically in 40 cities the amazing documentary The Trials of Muhammad Ali.

The film covers Ali's toughest bout: his battle to overturn a five-year prison sentence for refusing Us military service in Vietnam.

Prior to becoming the most recognizable face on earth, Cassius Clay became Muhammad Ali and found himself in the crosshairs of conflicts concerning race, religion, and wartime dissent. 'Trials' zeroes in on the most controversial years of Ali's life, when an emerging sports superhero chooses faith and conscience over fame and fortune.

La Maison de la Radio is a French documentary Richard bought from the company Films de Losange.

The story covers twenty-four hours in the life of Radio France, called the 'BBC of France' and the film goes from one dawn to another.

The film trails along its corridors, inside its recording studios, with its producers, presenters, journalists and various guests.

And outside on a motorbike with a microphone it follows in the wake of the Tour de France or in the company of an adventurous thunderstorm photographer.

It appears this week at the prestigious New York City theater The Film Forum.

Camille Claudel 1915 stars the great Juliette Binoche.

Set in winter, 1915.

The artist is confined by her family to an asylum in the South of France - where she will never sculpt again - the chronicle of Camille Claudel's tragic reclusive life, as she waits for a visit from her brother, Paul Claudel.

In October this film screens at New York's The Film Forum.

Violeta Went to Heaven is just now out on DVD.

It was a New York Times Critic's Pick and in Sundance 2012 it won the World Cinema Dramatic Jury Prize.

A portrait of famed Chilean singer and folklorist Violeta Parra filled with her musical work, her memories, her loves and her hopes. She began as an impoverished child and went on to become Chile's national heroine.
See full article at SydneysBuzz »
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