Histoire(s) du cinéma (1989–1999)
7.1/10
889
7 user 13 critic

Toutes les histoires 

An 8-part documentary chronically the history of cinema: "All the Histories", "A Single History", "Only Cinema", "Deadly "Beauty", "The Coin of the Absolute", "A New Wave", "The Control of the Universe", and "The Signs Among Us".

Director:

Jean-Luc Godard (uncredited)
Reviews

Photos

Edit

Storyline

An 8-part documentary chronically the history of cinema: "All the Histories", "A Single History", "Only Cinema", "Deadly "Beauty", "The Coin of the Absolute", "A New Wave", "The Control of the Universe", and "The Signs Among Us".

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

France | Switzerland

Language:

French

Release Date:

7 May 1989 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Historia/e kina: Wszystkie historie See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Included in Sight and Sound's poll in 2012 as one of the top 50 films of all time in See more »

Connections

Features The Red Badge of Courage (1951) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
A History of Film as Only Goddard Could Present
11 February 2019 | by kaljicSee all my reviews

It is easy to dismiss Jean-Luc Goddard's history of the film medium, Histoire du Cinema as an exercise in pretentious excess. There is no narrative to speak of. It is a total film montage consisting of sound bytes; sight bytes; short excerpts from notable movies. What narrative exists is brief and truncated. More like sound messages giving the briefest of commentary on the films presented. Goddard fiddles with the sound and sight bytes, slowing them down or speeding them up. It is easy to get lost watching this documentary; it is not easy viewing. Many times the images, sound bytes and sight bytes are superimposed one over the other. Sometimes, there are more than two snippets superimposed at one time. After two hundred and twenty minutes, the length of the documentary, you, the viewer are exhausted, confused, and dismissive - that is, of course, if you last that long.

Yet, I think I know where Goddard is trying to do.

First off, how do you summarize one hundred years of cinema in two hundred and twenty minutes? Goddard wanted to be complete, and this disjointed, non-linear story-telling literally is the only way the shear amount of history can be presented in a complete manner. It is complete in a very essential level. The images, the sounds act on a very subliminal level. They are flashed in front of the viewer's eyes to create the greatest effect and force the power of film to sink in deep in the viewer's psyche. Finally, although unconventional, Goddard's documentary style is not unknown, was influenced by, and has influenced subsequent, documentaries, all to a great effect.

This is essential, but not comfortable, viewing.


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 7 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Trending TV Series With Prime Video

Explore popular and recently added TV series available to stream now with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed