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Tiny Toon Adventures 

The wacky adventures of the new young hip generation of Warner Bros. Looney Tunes characters, most of them descendants of the original classic toon cast.
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4,693 ( 624)

Episodes

Seasons


Years



3   2   1  
1992   1991   1990  
Nominated for 1 Primetime Emmy. Another 10 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Series cast summary:
Charlie Adler ...  Buster Bunny / ... 94 episodes, 1990-1992
Tress MacNeille ...  Babs Bunny / ... 93 episodes, 1990-1992
Joe Alaskey ...  Plucky Duck / ... 84 episodes, 1990-1992
Frank Welker ...  Furrball / ... 76 episodes, 1990-1992
Don Messick ...  Hamton J. Pig / ... 72 episodes, 1990-1992
Cree Summer ...  Elmyra Duff / ... 59 episodes, 1990-1992
Maurice LaMarche ...  Dizzy Devil / ... 48 episodes, 1990-1992
Danny Cooksey ...  Montana Max / ... 46 episodes, 1990-1992
Rob Paulsen ...  Arnold the Pit Bull / ... 42 episodes, 1990-1992
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Storyline

In this series, a new generation of Looney Toon characters study at Acme Acres Looniversity under the instruction of the original characters. The leading characters are Buster and Babs Bunny (no relation) who, with their classmates, have a variety of adventures that are a mix of original stories, film and TV parodies and modern remakes of classic WB shorts. Written by Kenneth Chisholm <kchishol@execulink.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Add A Little Looney and a Lotta Fun To Your Collection! (USA DVD Volume 3) See more »


Certificate:

TV-G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

14 September 1990 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Steven Spielberg Presents... Tiny Toon Adventures See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Buster and Babs each represent a different aspect of Bugs Bunny's character. Buster represents his sarcastic, wisecracking side while Babs is his more off-the-wall, wild side. See more »

Goofs

The theme song says "The teaching staff's been getting laughs since 1933." No member of the Acme Looniversity faculty of classic Looney Tunes characters appeared in cartoons that early. The first to debut was Porky Pig, who first appeared in"I haven't got a hat" in 1935. They had to choose a number that ended in "3" so the opening theme song would rhyme, and 1933 is the closest year to 1935 that ends in a 3. See more »

Quotes

Plucky: [as BatDuck] I feel pretty.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Fifi LeFume comes out of the hole and says, "Au revoir, mon petit potato du couch!" See more »

Alternate Versions

When the show reran on Nickelodeon and Nicktoons Network the opening was edited removing the WB shield zooming out. Instead, a black screen was used and transition to the show's logo. See more »

Connections

Spoofed in Lupin III: Farewell to Nostradamus (1995) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »

User Reviews

 
A groundbreaking show. Seriously.
15 December 2005 | by zodrebSee all my reviews

It's now 2005 and 15+ years since this cartoon first aired. I haven't actually watched it seriously or closely in about 10 years. Now that I'm an adult in my 30s I can look back with a serious eye as I watch the episodes again.

In concept, the cartoon is partly an homage to the classic Looney Tunes but also its own original show. There are a few episodes that are structured like the old cartoons. For example, there is a singer that attacks Buster and so he exacts revenge on this singer's concert -exactly like the old Bugs Bunny cartoon. The ensuing cartoon is similar to Looney Tunes, just in a different era. If you look at the old Looney Tunes, they did an awful lot of stuff exactly like Tiny Toons did. The old Looney Tunes made a lot of social commentary and parody. There were celebrity impersonations. There were a lot of corny period jokes, slang, and dialog. The comedy was surreal and wacky. You can say this exactly for Tiny Toons as well. The comedy styling is 'spiritually' the same. Most definitely a throwback to the classics which hadn't been done well (if at all) in cartoons in the decades prior to this show. We recognize the cultural references in Tiny Toons and we can roll our eyes when something we don't like comes up. But the reason we don't think Looney Tunes are corny is because we weren't alive back in the 40s. Also, Looney Tunes was original back in those days but today cartoons are rehashed over and over. So it's easy to perceive Tiny Toons in an unfair light due to our exposure to current events and our overexposure to cartoons in general.

There certainly are differences in many respects - the timing, the delivery, and obviously the duration of the shows. They are two different styles from two different periods, being done under two very different circumstances - Looney Tunes being made for adults in theaters and Tiny Toons being made for kids watching TV. Even so, they did a good job making an original show with original gags AND still paying homage to and patterning after the comedy stylings of the old Looney Tunes.

Since Tiny Toons had a lot more time to play with, they had some genuine moments of great animated inspiration. You only have to look at episodes like 1 minute to 3, the baby Plucky toilet episode.. there are so many more. For example, one of the best comedy dialog exchanges ever animated is in ThirteenSomething when Babs and Buster are on the phone in a split screen, hoping each misses the other. The miscommunication is spectacular. Notably, the character development in this episode and in several others (usually the ones penned by Deanna Oliver or Sherri Stoner) is rather good. The female characters were taken seriously as personalities and developed, unusual considering the opposite is usually true for cartoons of that period.

This was the first modern cartoon that had lots of both pop culture-referential and self-referential humor. This was way ahead of its time. Tiny Toons really opened up a door for writers to take comic liberties that are so common in the cartoons today, instead of doing the boring old crap we endured as 80s kids. Yes, I loved Transformers and Thundercats, but Tiny Toons totally jumped away from all that. It was a breath of fresh air. Bakshi's New Adventures of Mighty Mouse may have been a precursor, but Tiny Toons made this surreal style of comedy cartoon writing a real success.

As a kid I totally overlooked some jokes. For example, one episode is an homage to the Marx Brothers that I completely ignored as a teen. Now I have a newfound respect for it. There are so many inspired gags that I never noticed that are genuinely brilliant. It's that kind of comedy that makes me think of Looney Tunes and Family Guy. I NEVER noticed that kind of comedy as a kid. I've been thinking this for most episodes I watched recently.

You'd notice these kinds of things if you actually WATCHED the show. Unlike some other reviewers here who I know are unfairly judging it, I've seen all the episodes and have thought about them thoroughly, exposed both as a kid and as an adult.

You can tell there was an awful lot of care taken with the voice acting too. I'm not talking about just the main characters, but the side characters were done really well and creatively too. But back to the main characters, some of the main characters were brilliant. Tress MacNeille had, in my opinion, her best performances in this cartoon. She hasn't been the same since. Rob Paulsen also did some incredible stuff here, too.

This is all not to say the show didn't have some bad episodes. It had plenty. It had a lot of mediocre ones, too. But by far it certainly had a lot of genuinely funny episodes. Especially back when it first aired it was actually funny to watch.

Out of 10 I give the show an 8.5 - and kudos for pushing the envelope and breaking down the doors leading to a new era of cartoons.


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