5.8/10
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5 user 2 critic

The Last Party (1993)

Robert Downey, Jr. gives reports and interviews with other stars in this documentary about the Democratic National Convention in 1992.

Writers:

Robert Downey Jr., Donovan Leitch Jr. (as Donovan Leitch) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Robert Downey Jr. ... Himself
Bill Clinton ... Himself
Ann Palmer Ann Palmer ... Herself
Hilary Anderson Hilary Anderson ... Herself
Patti Davis Patti Davis ... Herself
Robert Downey Sr. ... Himself
Josh Richman Josh Richman ... Himself
Curtis Sliwa Curtis Sliwa ... Himself - Guardian Angels
Spike Lee ... Himself
Tracy Gray Tracy Gray ... Herself
Vanessa Warner Vanessa Warner ... Herself
Jerry Brown ... Himself
Kate Barnhart Kate Barnhart ... Herself (AIDS activist?)
Joey DiPaolo Joey DiPaolo ... Himself - Very Young AIDS Activist
Roger Clinton ... Himself - Singer and Brother of Bill Clinton
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Storyline

Robert Downey, Jr. gives reports and interviews with other stars in this documentary about the Democratic National Convention in 1992.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

America, this is your wake up call.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language, and for some nudity and marijuana smoking
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

27 August 1993 (USA) See more »

Filming Locations:

New York City, New York, USA See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono
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Did You Know?

Quotes

Robert Downey Jr.: [At the Republican Convention] Look at all these sandwiches!... Obviously the party in power.
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Crazy Credits

Thanks to Lord Shri Krishna See more »

Connections

References Chaplin (1992) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Postcards from America 1992
19 December 2003 | by ween-3See all my reviews

A neat little documentary from Robert Downey that manages to capture a Kodak moment in US history revolving around 1992 presidential campaigns and the issues circulating in the orbit of election politics...Obviously, Downey was inspired by the tone of Michael Moore's 1989 "Roger And Me" and decided to jump on the bandwagon early. The difference in approach stems from the fact that Downey's cachet as an actor guaranteed him access to the places and people on the inside whereas Moore was more comfortable on the streets. Ergo, the entertainment portion of Moore's film comes when he tries to get to see the top brass, whereas the fun with Downey begins when he has to downsize himself to street level. Both Moore and Downey fearlessly make assholes of themselves in the pursuit of a solid, entertaining documentary. While there's no mistaking Downey's political sympathies, he does a fairly decent job of sticking it to both major parties with equal fervor. And after all the screaming, yelling, rap and rhetoric, his final shots are of himself and his family at home...and if Downey has a message, it's contained in whatever you want to read into those last few minutes of the film.


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