Blue Chips (1994) Poster

(1994)

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Under-Rated Sports Film That Tells Important Story
tfrizzell15 September 2000
"Blue Chips" is a vastly under-rated sports film which deals with the shady dealings of colleges and their players. Nick Nolte plays a college basketball coach who is so desperate to return to his glory days that he breaks the rules by giving his newest recruits (Shaquille O'Neal, Anfernee Hardaway, and Matt Nover) basically anything they and their families want. School alumnus J.T. Walsh is the catalyst to these shady dealings and now the college has a winning team again, but at what price? "Blue Chips" is another one of William Friedkin's films that is much deeper than it first appears on the surface. With the exception of "The French Connection" and "The Exorcist", this is his finest film as a director. His documentary-style makes you feel as if you are in on all the action. Numerous parts are played by real basketball players and coaches, adding a great bit of realism to the story. "The French Connection" benefited from this style by having real cops in key roles and "The Exorcist" did the same having priests play themselves. Shaquille O'Neal, Anfernee Hardaway, and Matt Nover do surprisingly well with the material. They are all three-dimensional characters and shine throughout the film. However with that said, it is Nick Nolte who is the primary factor that makes the film well worth while. Far from perfect, but still a very good movie. 4 out of 5 stars.
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9/10
Most Underrated Sports Movie Ever!
chrisinaltoona5 March 2009
I'm not a big sports movie guy, so I went into this not really expecting much other than killing 90 some minutes. I loved it! To see the struggle of a school and coach as they attempt to create a legit winning team in an environment of corruption was interesting. Then when they join that corruption it becomes exciting, you just know it's gonna blowup some time. Nick Nolte carries this film throughout it's entirety, and amazingly the real life players do a great job of acting and the rest of the cast is perfect. I love how they took real players and coaches and brought them into this film, it fits perfectly. The last 35 minutes of this film is brilliant. I've seen many people here talk of how bad this film is, I wonder if they just don't care about sports that much like myself, or have some underlying bias about admitting the corruption exists and always has in much of college sports. I don't care for sports! But I loved this film. The ratings this film gets on here really ticks me off, what is it, a 5.5 star average? I've learned one thing on here and other review sites, if you let others judge for you, you'll miss a lot of good movies.
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Tells it like it is
bob the moo25 July 2002
Pete Bell is a college basketball coach. He's under pressure to win and is under pressure to get the players by any means necessary. How will he stand up to the pressure or will he give in to pressure?

Basketball movies are often the `weak team overcomes' type and are not exactly great. Some are good (Hoosiers) but most are mildly distracting at best (The air up there), few reach the heights of Hoop Dreams. However Blue Chips is good because it manages to cast a critical eye over the real world of college ball – there are no small town winners, there are no `kids with hearts of gold' etc – instead it is as much a business as the NBA and the stakes are high to get the best players.

Bell shows us how he must juggle doing what's right but also doing what the players want in order to get a winning team. This is refreshing – rather than yet another sports movie with the same old cliches. The down side is that it doesn't go far enough in my mind and it doesn't offer solutions.

Nolte is good and is really convincing as a coach – even if he's a bit OTT at times on the sidelines. His support is great in the form of McDonnell, Walsh, Woodard and the real players of Shaq and Penny do OK. The cast is also filled out with plenty of coaches, commentators and such from real life – so there's plenty to see.

Overall this is one of my favourite basketball movies simply because it tells it like it is – even if it does have it's weaknesses.
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9/10
Awesome Basketball Movie!
koastergirl29 September 2004
This movie can't come out on DVD soon enough! I have loved this movie since that first time I saw it. As someone that has always played basketball, I found it very entertaining. The acting was good, but the story line was great. After playing intercolligiate athletics, athletes being coaxed to do things outside of the NCAA rules is very relevant in any sport. I think that any sports fan would enjoy watching this movie. As a University of Kentucky basketball fan, I enjoyed seeing Bobby Knight get a little mad!!! Pete Bell was a man with a lot on his mind and finally realized that his career had gone far away from what basketball and sports should be...having fun! I really wish this DVD would be released!!!
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6/10
Good basketball movie
Agent108 June 2002
While the story was rather interesting, it seemed like it was too sensationalized for it own good. Unfortunately, in a movie about basketball players, one cannot find 7-foot actors, which meant Shaq O'Neal was one of the few people who could fill the role. This entire film tries to hard, accentuating points too harshly, and showing how corrupt the entire system in a manner that doesn't appear believable. I will say this, Nick Nolte really embodies the uber-Bobby Knight character, and what happened to Matt Nover? He was clearly the only good actor amongst all of the basketball players in the film.
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7/10
another underrated movie, a great film
apursansar16 October 2000
This movie is very underrated, it hasn't gotten nearly the credit it deserves. I thought it was very well done, although it wasn't perfect, it was still very good. It is the first movie to talk about a problem that is very prominent in todays colleges and their methods of recruiting. The film is very well written and Nick Nolte does a great, great job playing the conflicted coach.
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3/10
What Could Have Been
alexkolokotronis29 January 2008
Warning: Spoilers
This movie seems to have a funny and interesting idea from the outlook. Yet this movies never quite takes off in the right direction or any direction. Through the first half of the movie it builds up as a comedy. In the second half it tries to alter itself into an engaging drama. Personally I had no problem with Shaq and Penny Hardaway in the movie. Nick Nolte with his character fit perfectly. Still the writing was totally unimpressive and horrible except for the one scene with Nick Nolte at the end with his press conference. Everything else in this movie seems to be cliché and would not amuse anyone except for small kids.

The supporting cast other than the three basketball players and Nolte's ex-wife fit perfectly or should I say match the poor and cliché writing of this movie. For example J.T. Walsh was cast as Happy. Happy was in charge or at least had connections that helped Nolte get his top notch recruits with illegal strategies such as buying houses, giving money and buying other luxurious items for the recruits' families. J.T. Walsh seemed very easy to spot as a corrupt and horrible man even though his character is supposed to have a low profile and be behind the scenes. This presents a huge problem for a key character who does seem to be quite believable. He is supposed to be the man doing things under the table instead he is totally visible to the public.

As I said before the writing in this movie does not engage the audience because it doesn't take on its own identity. It is hard to call this a comedy with too few jokes and attempts to amuse the audience and it is hard to call this a drama with the movie trying to be portrayed as a comedy.

This movie could have been easily fixed if there was more work done on the writing and the casting. Blue Chips attempts to show the corruption in college sports but it fails to show the many aspects of it. Such as the corporate sponsors and the pressure an athletic director is under of loosing their job. It does not show the competing colleges vying for the top recruits and most of all it does not show you how such pure and genuine feeling such as playing a sport can be so easily corrupted by the pressure and the need for winning from coaches and colleges to fans and corporate sponsors. This sounds like a lot but could have been very easily included in the movie without having to overextend this into a 2 1/2 hour movie.
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8/10
The World Of High Pressure College Sports
Desertman8425 October 2011
Warning: Spoilers
Blue Chips gives us a view of high pressure college sports.It is a film about basketball that stars Nick Nolte as a college coach,Pete Bell,who was based loosely on Coach Bob Knight of Texas Tech,together with real- life basketball stars Shaquille O'Neal,Anfernee "Penny" Hardaway and Matt Nover as talented recruits.

Blue Chips examines greed, cheating, and "winning at all costs" in the world of college basketball. Pete Bell is the stressed-out coach on the verge of his first losing season, who hits the road in search of new players not already signed by a bigger school. He finds three prospects: a precision Chicago shooter Butch McRae,a giant farm boy Ricky Roe and a talented troublemaker Neon.

All three top prospects, wise to the ways of college basketball recruitment, make excessive financial and lifestyle demands before they can be persuaded to come to the school.Coach Bell, already haunted by accusations of underhanded dealings, doesn't want to dig himself a deeper hole but has no choice.

The movie was started really well.Director William Friedkin and Writer Ron Shelton made an accurate depiction of the reality of college recruitment and the morality play that schools figure in on the college sports.There was also a story about how college players get involved with game fixing themselves.The acting was great on Nick Nolte as usual.While the performance of Shaq was good for his first screen appearance.But in the end,it "chickened out" and opted for an implausible conclusion and resolved for a Hollywood ending.

But given its poor ending,Blue Chips is still an entertaining movie to watch especially for basketball fans.
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7/10
Deserves more attention!
RaoulGonzo6 April 2017
Nick Nolte plays a college University basketball coach forced to break the rules in order to stay competitive. He deals with guilt and struggles internally with something he has always been against.

What a surprise Blue Chips was, expecting a below par sports movie (based on reviews) but found a thought provoking and entertaining 110 minutes. To begin with it hits the normal sports movie beats but just when you think the drama is going one way, suddenly it doesn't and that only adds realism to the action.

William Friedkin does an excellent job in creating a tense and real life atmosphere, almost documentary style at least during the game-play scenes that makes you feel fully immersed. It's clear Friedkin and co have thoroughly researched this area and you get a sense of that while watching. The use of real life Basketball players and coaches adds to the authenticity.

During the drama the film deals with the shady dealings that no doubt goes on in American sports at college level (It's a massive deal, where careers and futures are made). A story of greed, cheating and pressure to win. Nolte is great in the role and gets to show off his soft side while also providing his well known manic style. Blue Chips really is an under-rated film although not perfect it deserves to be more well known.
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8/10
Very Realistic movie
justingivens-3731930 November 2015
This movie could have potentially been based on a true story. The plot of the movie was unlike any other basketball or sports movie. Also the casting of actual NBA players like Penny Hardaway and Shaq was brilliant by the director. They both played great parts in this movie as highly recruited blue chip basketball players and fit perfectly within the plot. This movie was also unique in the regards that it featured other universities like Bobby Knight and the Indiana Hoosiers. Although this movie was a great movie overall , i feel it could have had a better ending. The ending of the movie was pretty weak and was the only downfall of this movie. However I still believe that this is one of the best basketball movies of all time and there will never be a movie like this again.
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9/10
Nick Nolte is Outstanding!
namashi_17 February 2014
Nick Nolte is Outstanding in his portrayal of a frustrated, ambitious basketball coach in 'Blue Chips'. The legendary actor, who's had a career full of amazing performances, tops himself, yet again with his portrayal in here.

'Blue Chips' Synopsis: A college basketball coach is forced to break the rules in order to get the players he needs to stay competitive.

'Blue Chips' is an interesting watch. Ron Shelton's Screenplay is grasping & often-confounding. It depicts a human-story, full of human-emotions & gives Nolte ample score to the anchor the film. William Friedkin's Direction is good.

Performance-Wise: Nolte is the life of the show. He's in complete command & holds the film from start to end. Its amongst his greatest performances, that proves us once again, what a fine actor Nolte is!

On the whole, 'Blue Chips' works & Nolte doesn't miss a single beat.
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6/10
scattered story overloaded with cameo
SnoopyStyle18 March 2016
Pete Bell (Nick Nolte) is the hard-pressed college basketball coach of Western University running a seemingly clean program. Reporter Ed (Ed O'Neill) has been hounding him about an alleged point shaving incident four years ago. He has his first losing season after winning a few championships. He pushes his team to recruit harder. Butch McRae (Penny Hardaway)'s mother Lavada (Alfre Woodard) wants to be compensated. Farm boy Ricky Roe is more interested in girls. Neon Boudeaux (Shaq) traveled a winding road under the recruiters' radar and scored horribly with his SAT. Pete uses his ex-wife Jenny (Mary McDonnell) as his tutor. His idealism is constantly being worn away by school booster Happy (J.T. Walsh).

Nick Nolte holds this together as much as possible. There are many cameos. It's overloaded and some of it is unnecessary. There's no point in having Larry Bird. The movie has so much already. It could trim some of the extras. It has to tighten the first act because it is still waiting to introduce the new players. It's not until midpoint when Shaq finally shows up. Shaq doesn't deserve his Razzie. He's got natural charisma. It's also hard to make this team an underdog with Shaq around. The college ball corruption discussion can be overwrought but I'm fine with that.
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10/10
My favorite basketball movie ever.
Ro-930 September 1998
Blue Chips is a great basketball movie. It features great, realistic basketball action filmed at normal speed using low angles so you can't tell they are acting. Nick Nolte is fantastic as Coach Pete Bell with so many great quotes I couldn't list them all here. Directed by William Friedkin, (The Exorcist) Blue Chips really uses it basketball players well. Athletes are probably the worst actors in the world, but in this movie they do most of their acting on the court so it really works. The action is told almost exclusively through Nick Nolte's point of view and his inner conflict with breaking the collegiate rules is stressed heavily. Also features memorable performances by J.T. Walsh as Happy, and cameos by countless college basketball players and coaches and a very entertaining cameo by Larry Bird. I strongly recommend you watch this movie, it's the best basketball movie ever!
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8/10
Good basketball film - original!
sue-webb-319-5198895 August 2017
"Blue Chips" is a vastly under-rated sports film which deals with the shady dealings of colleges and their players. Nick Nolte plays a college basketball coach who is so desperate to return to his glory days that he breaks the rules by giving his newest recruits (Shaquille O'Neal, Anfernee Hardaway, and Matt Nover) basically anything they and their families want. School alumnus J.T. Walsh is the catalyst to these shady dealings and now the college has a winning team again, but at what price? "Blue Chips" is another one of William Friedkin's films that is much deeper than it first appears on the surface. With the exception of "The French Connection" and "The Exorcist", this is his finest film as a director. His documentary-style makes you feel as if you are in on all the action. Numerous parts are played by real basketball players and coaches, adding a great bit of realism to the story. "The French Connection" benefited from this style by having real cops in key roles and "The Exorcist" did the same having priests play themselves. Shaquille O'Neal, Anfernee Hardaway, and Matt Nover do surprisingly well with the material. They are all three-dimensional characters and shine throughout the film. However with that said, it is Nick Nolte who is the primary factor that makes the film well worth while. Far from perfect, but still a very good movie. 4 out of 5 stars.
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7/10
Chipping in.
morrison-dylan-fan30 July 2017
Warning: Spoilers
With the weekend coming up,I decided to check what flicks were about to leave Netflix UK. Knowing him for his tough Horror/Thriller titles,I was surprised to spot a Sports Drama by William Friedkin,which led to me grabbing a pack of chips.

The plot:

Suffering a terrible season, legendary basketball coach Pete Bell feels the pressure to get the team back on track. Remembering how successful he has been in finding new comers,Bell looks towards the amateur league. As Bell signs on new talent,he learns that some of his best players have been cashing in backhanders.

View on the film:

Fuming by the sideline, Nick Nolte gives a powerhouse performance as Bell,who bites the arm of anyone who gets on his wrong side. Joined by the very good,more mellow J.T. Walsh, Mary McDonnell and Al Bundy, (playing a character with the very original name "Ed"!)Nolte gives Bell's marching orders to the team a warm howl,as Bell's sets his sights on the team leaping to victory.

Shooting hoops as a writer,the screenplay by Ron Shelton scoops out most of the feel-good Sports movie clichés for a more earthy approach,with the issues the team face in backhanders and burnouts lingering as doubt in Bell for the whole season. Appearing to set up a cheerful final shot, Shelton instead slams the ball down for a poetic ending which gets to Bell's love of the game. Ducking and weaving in the game,director William Friedkin & cinematographer Tom Priestley Jr. gives the games a documentary closeness,via tightly held shots listening in on each team member helping to plan victory by chipping in.
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He Got Shame
tieman646 August 2014
Warning: Spoilers
Money corrupts in "Blue Chips", one of director William Friedkin's better films. It stars the always watchable Nick Nolte as a basketball coach who breaks regulations, rules and bribery statutes in order to put together a winning team.

Nolte often plays tortured characters who crumble under the weight of guilt and self-hatred. Here his character, Pete Bell, starts off as a confident con-man but eventually becomes a hunchbacked wreck. In the film's climactic sequence (possibly informed by a decade's worth of NCAA athletic scandals), Bell stands before journalists and delivers an almighty confession, denouncing the corruption which spawns organically from systems reliant upon profit, loss and winning at any cost. Evocative of "And Justice For All", which featured a similar last-act rant by Al Pacino, the film also anticipates Spike Lee's "He Got Game", another basketball flick which milks similar themes.

7.9/10 – Worth one viewing.
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7/10
See Shaq before he had his own zip code
Vladefan2129 September 2003
This isn't a bad movie at all. Considering the scandals that have come to light about college athletes receiving cars, houses, money, etc. this film has even more relevance today than it did when it first came out.

To see a Shaquille O'Neal full of potential and natural talent (yet not yet spoiled by his own success) is a thrill - even for a Kings fan. His acting isn't the point; it's the few scenes that show him actually playing basketball that are worth watching for.
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7/10
An Excellent Basketball Movie
Lizardma14 March 2000
Yes, I would admit that this movie is not THE greatest basketball movie of all time. I suppose Hoosiers would get that title. The only real pet-peave I had is that the basketball players such as Penny, Shaq, and Matt are not exactly Shakespearean actors. Of course, their athletic ability is perfect for their parts and the movie covers their acting deficiencies enough with plenty of playing scenes including numerous dunks by Shaq. I'm a huge college b-ball fan and the cameos including Pitino, Knight, Tark, and Dicky V give the movie a better sense of realism. Knight was certainly great at playing himself, which involves yelling-cursing at the players and refs. Nick Nolte makes this movie, however. He comes off thoroughly convincing as a veteran college coach who is facing the twilight of his career and considers illegal recruiting tactics to get a winning team again. The series of the movie with his recruiting visits is the best part. He did a great job at kissing up to the players and parents. Now is this movie realistic? I don't know for sure, but it was still entertaining and fun to watch nonetheless.
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Decent Movie, Good Sports Movie
johnh08710 August 2003
Blue Chips, for a sports movie, was very well done and well put together. Pete Bell, played by Nolte, is a Bob Knight style coach at Western University, a fictitous university in LA (think UCLA). After a few sub-par seasons, he has his first losing season as head coach and to keep up with the other big programs (think Kentucky and Michigan), he needs to recruit some top players, or blue chips, to come to Western. Strictly against under the table recruiting, Bell is forced to make a tough decision. Recruit good but not great players and perhaps lose his job due to losing as head coach, or go after the top 10 recruits to keep his job and start winning again. The movie plays out well and supporting actors, JT Walsh and Shaq, give solid performances. As for the basketball action itself, this movie probably has the best game sequences I have ever seen in a movie, with real college players filling as extras. There is also a load of cameos, including Rick Pitino, Dick Vitale and Larry Bird to name a few. Blue Chips is a solid movie and a very good sports movie.
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Highly underrated movie - great idea generator
bucksalldaymkay24 February 2018
This movie is essential for any coach looking for that upper-hand in winning the brutal recruiting war. Nolte's performance as a win-at-all-costs coach is truly captivating. After all, is it REALLY cheating when everyone else is doing it? Go Cats!
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2/10
Stereotypes abound
benjamin_380xd12 February 2006
If you know the doings of Bobby Knight, then you'll quickly notice that coach Pete Bell is modeled after the IU legend. Even down to the kicking the basketball in the stands. His "teaching" of the games, emphasis on defense, and heretofore clean program could have been lifted from "Season on the Brink" by John Feinstein. And if you enjoy seeing Tark the Shark, Jim Boeheim, Bob Cousy, and even Knight himself, you will like this film. If you are looking for continuity, character development, and basically a reason for filming this monstrosity of a jock movie,then you will be disappointed. True, it was filmed in Indiana, my native state. True, Larry Bird makes a cameo appearance but the rest of it is so clichéd that you'll wonder why the screenwriters didn't inject a bit of originality. This type of story has been done dozens of times previously and it could work again. But when the producers are overly reliant on big name sports stars and lame acting from all, you have a very predictable flick that is good for little more than killing 90 minutes of tube time.
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6/10
Underrated, under-appreciated, dark sports tale
bayou_hannibal8 August 2012
Blue Chips was a movie that was at least a decade ahead of its time, and its story is more relevant today than when the movie came out. It presents a question that other sports movies, including amateur sports movies, haven't explored. Namely, why should you bother to follow the rules when cheating is already widespread? Is it wrong to cheat if that's what it takes to compete? Is widespread cheating in amateur athletics the inevitable result of fans' obsession with winning? This movie would seem to suggest that the answers to those last two questions are "no" and "yes". Almost every other sports movie of the past 50 years has had some kind of uplifting ending, but this one ends mostly on a downer.

Nick Nolte plays a college basketball coach, coaching at a major California basketball school (which might as well be UCLA), clearly modeled after Bobby Knight. He's a hot-tempered, aging and increasingly frustrated, old-school guy whose record has slipped in recent years. A shady booster enters the picture, trying to convince him that if he wants to be on top again, he has to start playing "the game" with recruits. He has to start making deals. Coach Nolte is initially hostile to the guy, but after it looks like he's going to get shut out of getting three huge recruits, he reluctantly changes his mind. Nolte gives an excellent performance in this movie. Everything that he does in the movie, whether it's angry tantrums against refs or the occasional dose of humor, he does well. He is convincing as a guy who just wants to mold student-athletes and coach the game that he loves. The speech that he gives at the end is priceless.

The more I read about recruiting, especially basketball recruiting, the more I feel like I need to take a shower. This movie perfectly captures the sleaze of the sport during its recruiting scenes. There's the scum bag "deal maker" mother, who tries to peddle her influence to the highest bidder. There is the superstar white kid, who recognizes his value and demands a huge pile of cash. One kid eventually gets a new car. The movie ultimately presents a pretty revolting picture of college athletics, and if you have followed the scandals at places like Auburn, you know that it is pretty accurate.

This movie could have been a failure, but it has that one important trait that all great sports movies have. It was made with a genuine love and respect for the sport. There is a lot of basketball porn in this movie, perhaps even too much. There are scenes that show Nolte coaching Xs and Os. The coaches yell out a bunch of terminology during practices and games, as opposed to 95% of sports movies, where coaches never sound like actual coaches. Blue Chips tries to be one of the more realistic sports movies ever made, and it largely succeeds. It perhaps goes a little too far though with the basketball porn, showing tons and tons of slam dunks and three pointers. If you watch this movie, you would get the impression that 90% of the scoring in basketball is due to these two plays. It also has a somewhat annoying appearance by Dick Vitale, which serves no purpose except to remind you that you are watching a basketball movie. The movie also shoehorns a few too many current basketball stars into it. That might have made it sell better at the time, but do you really care now whether Penny Hardaway and Bobby Hurley appear in it? (And Hurley plays for Indiana in this movie – LULZ).

The worst part about this movie, ultimately, is the casting of the basketball stars in it. Namely, Shaquille O'Neal, who can't act his way out of a paper bag. To make matters worse, they give his character the most interesting background story, that of a Gulf War veteran with a "Black power, we shall overcome" type attitude. He's awful. He's really awful. It's as if he had a part written for Ice Cube or Denzel Washington, but then the studio decided that they needed a big name star in the case. He doesn't have many lines, but the ones that he has are not good.

Blue Chips is one of those sports movies that you should see at least once. It's unlikely that you will remember it amongst the best that you have seen, but if you follow college athletics, you should at least find it interesting. Blue Chips shows us the hypocrisy of college athletics, and the seemingly futile endeavor of trying to keep money out of the hands of athletes. It is though provoking, albeit a bit preachy. Given the current debates about whether we should be paying players, this movie is now more relevant than it ever has been.
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Should have been called Cow Chips
Andy-29319 April 1999
Avoid this movie. Anyone who thinks this is the best basketball movie of all time has never seen Hoosiers or Hoop Dreams. Hoosiers and Hoop Dreams are to basketball movies what Caddyshack is to golf movies-clearly the best of the genre. Blue Chips is to basketball movies what Caddyshack 2 is to golf movies-so bad, everyone involved in its production should be suspended from making movies.
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5/10
Nope!
Headbiscuit21 June 2003
Blue Chips - starting such wasted talent as Nick Nolte! Not to mention such all star actors as Shaquille O'Neal. From the get-go, it is not the smartest of movies, but it did have its fair share of entertaining value as the movie progressed. I thought Shaq would be a dismal actor, but he came to play, or at least more than Nolte did. I felt Nolte and his character were wildly out of control, not balanced with the movie, and simply not quality. I clearly understand that his character is a wild individual, but the odd mood swings, and multi-persona touch that he added to the character was weird and distracting.

Props to Shaq for dunking nearly continously during the film - once again showing that his shooting range is typically 2-3 inches. A shame too, because the movie highlight this stereotype and runs with it. Penny was alright, but in this day in age, where is his almost a forgotten player, it was more of a nostalgia to watch him in the movie.

Overall, the movie sucked. The moral plot was weak, and there was little else to the content of the film. By far the worst part was the ended which gives rather weak explanations of what happens post-ending.

5/10 stars for some decent basketball footage, and a different type of basketball movie. But it lacks five stars for poor plot, acting, and a sloppy ending which tries to tie together a bunch of moral stuff without much success.
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Foul ball
soranno2 November 2002
Shaquille O'Neal is a great basketball player and it would be nice if his attempts in other fields would lead to equal success but so far, they haven't. This 1994 Paramount release was O'Neal's film debut and features him in a weak story costarring Nick Nolte as a Bobby Knight type character who is dealing with reaching profitable success both on and off the basketball courts. Several cameos help to enhance and improve this film somewhat. At least it's better than O'Neal's later films which would include the unbelievably bad fantasy comedies "Kazaam" and "Steel."
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