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11 Great Female Cinematographers Who Subvert the Male Gaze

This summer, New York is playing home to one of the biggest film events of the season: the Film Society of Lincoln Center’s packed 36-film retrospective featuring the work of 23 women cinematographers. Keying off Rachel Morrison’s first-ever Oscar nomination for a female cinematographer, the series serves the dual purposes of celebrating the incredible work of the pioneering artists who broke into the male-dominated field, as well of re-examining Laura Mulvey’s seminal essay about the male gaze by asking if there is such a thing as the “The Female Gaze?”

In the spirit of the series, IndieWire, with the help of some of our subjects’ closest collaborators and fiercest admirers, took a deeper look at 11 of the DPs featured in the series to discover what makes their work so great.

Maryse Alberti

Key Films: “The Golden Boat,” “Poison,” “Crumb,” “Happiness,” “Velvet Goldmine,” “The Wrestler,” “Creed,” “Chappaquiddick.”

When someone
See full article at Indiewire »

7 Other Women Who Deserved Oscar Nominations for Best Cinematography

“Script girl.” “Best boy.” “Cameraman.” Each of these on-set job descriptions are terribly outdated, but only one of them persists in our collective vocabulary, such an ingrained part of the cinematic lexicon that few people ever think to challenge what it implies. “Script girl” has been rebranded as the more inclusive script supervisor, while “best boy” — a relic from a time when it was automatically assumed that a man would be a master’s most capable apprentice — remains common parlance in the film industry, yet meaningless to the rest of the world.

“Cameraman,” on the other hand, remains the kind of thing that people say without thinking, every utterance of the word helping to reaffirm the gender bias that created it. And so we find ourselves in a world where women comprise only four percent of the American Society of Cinematographers (as of 2015, anyway), and the phrase “female cinematographer” is
See full article at Indiewire »

Five Things You Didn’t Know about Terry Zwigoff

It’s been tough all around lately for any Hollywood professionals even remotely near to the recent Harvey Weinstein blacklist news. Director Terry Zwigoff was swept into the controversy when he expressed interest in casting Mira Sorvino for Bad Santa. Deadline recently reported that Zwigoff tweeted his apologies to Mira, telling her that whenever he mentioned her to the Weinsteins, he’d hear the “Click” of the phone on the other end, hanging up on him. Completely aside from the current news, Terry Zwigoff has carved out a significant contribution to documentary and darker comedy films. His critically acclaimed documentary Crumb was

Five Things You Didn’t Know about Terry Zwigoff
See full article at TVovermind.com »

All of the Films Joining FilmStruck’s Criterion Channel this August

Each month, the fine folks at FilmStruck and the Criterion Collection spend countless hours crafting their channels to highlight the many different types of films that they have in their streaming library. This August will feature an exciting assortment of films, as noted below.

To sign up for a free two-week trial here.

Tuesday, August 1

Tuesday’s Short + Feature: These Boots and Mystery Train

Music is at the heart of this program, which pairs a zany music video by Finnish master Aki Kaurismäki with a tune-filled career highlight from American independent-film pioneer Jim Jarmusch. In the 1993 These Boots, Kaurismäki’s band of pompadoured “Finnish Elvis” rockers, the Leningrad Cowboys, cover a Nancy Sinatra classic in their signature deadpan style. It’s the perfect prelude to Jarmusch’s 1989 Mystery Train, a homage to the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll and the musical legacy of Memphis, featuring appearances by Screamin’ Jay Hawkins and Joe Strummer.
See full article at CriterionCast »

Criterion Now – Episode 24 – Ghost World, Crumb, Barnes & Noble Sale

Aaron, Travis and Tim Leggoe dig into the world of Terry Zwigoff, the Barnes & Noble Sale, predictions and wish lists for October Criterion releases, reactions to the Sean Baker episode, and plenty more. We also have announced a contest so listen carefully.

Episode Notes

8:00 – Sean Baker Reactions

19:00 – Barnes & Noble

30:00 – October Predictions

47:00 – Ghost World

1:10 – Short Takes (The Exterminating Angel, Summer Interlude, Crumb)

1:21:30 – FilmStruck

Episode Links Barnes & Noble Criterion Sale Thora Birch: How Hollywood’s Darling Disappeared Janus Films – The Human Condition Tweet Criterion Close-Up 23: Breaker Morant and Mister Johnson Episode Credits Aaron West: Twitter | Website | Letterboxd Tim Leggoe: Blog | Letterboxd | Twitter Travis Trudell: Twitter | Instagram Criterion Now: Twitter | Facebook Group Criterion Cast: Facebook | Twitter

Music for the show is from Fatboy Roberts’ Geek Remixed project.
See full article at CriterionCast »

Terry Zwigoff Signs With ICM Partners

Terry Zwigoff Signs With ICM Partners
Exclusive: Terry Zwigoff has signed with ICM Partners. Zwigoff is best known for directing the black comedies Bad Santa and Ghost World, as well as the heralded documentary Crumb, about the cartoonist Robert Crumb. Zwigoff, who had been with Wme, most recently helmed for Amazon Studios Budding Prospects, about a group that disconnects and sets out to grow pot in the country. Zwigoff remains with attorney Robert…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

‘Ghost World’ Director Terry Zwigoff Runs Down All The Films He Couldn’t Get Made

Terry Zwigoff hasn’t always had the best relationship with Hollywood. His films tend to be prickly human portraits (“Crumb,” “Ghost World“) that don’t make for easy marketing, and the biggest commercial film of his career, “Bad Santa,” saw him enter a heated battle with the Weinsteins, who wanted to soften its sharper edges (read our candid interview with Zwigoff for all the juicy details).

Continue reading ‘Ghost World’ Director Terry Zwigoff Runs Down All The Films He Couldn’t Get Made at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Terry Zwigoff Retrospective Exclusive Trailer: Metrograph to Screen All Five of the ‘Ghost World’ and ‘Crumb’ Director’s Films

Terry Zwigoff Retrospective Exclusive Trailer: Metrograph to Screen All Five of the ‘Ghost World’ and ‘Crumb’ Director’s Films
Beginning next Friday, New York’s Metrograph will present a Terry Zwigoff retrospective that includes screenings of all five of his feature films. The weekend-long series begins with “Ghost World” and continues with “Louie Bluie,” “Art School Confidential” and “Bad Santa” before closing with his acclaimed documentary; Zwigoff will appear in person at each screening. Watch an exclusive trailer for the tribute below.

Read More: Nicolas Cage To Play A ‘Lost Melody’ For Terry Zwigoff Plus Watch A New Clip From ‘The Frozen Ground

Here are some notes on the festivities in Metrograph’s own words: “Terry Zwigoff never seemed to belong to the careerist, wheeler-dealer world of the Sundance indie, and that’s part of his charm. Catapulted to prominence with ‘Crumb,’ his instant classic documentary on underground legend R. Crumb, Zwigoff went on to reel out a trio of blackly-comic fiction films which all together offer a jaundiced,
See full article at Indiewire »

Top 21 Non-Traditional Christmas Movies To Watch

As we head into the holiday season, Wamg brings you our list of the Best Non-Traditional Christmas Movies to watch after the Holiday ham, pretty presents, and multiple viewings of White Christmas, Home Alone and Miracle On 34th Street are a thing of Christmas Past.

Our choices are filled snarky mistletoe carnage and crafty comedy – Geek style. Santa Claus is coming to town in these “More Naughty Than Nice”. films.

We’ve made a list and checked it twice with our lineup of not just the 20 Best holiday films but the Top 21 Non-Traditional Christmas Movies. After the success of Krampus, we just had to add it!

We kick off our list with our Honorable Mention –

Jingle All The Way

Christmas; It’s the most magical time of the year. High powered businessman Howard Langston (Arnold Schwarzenegger), is hard at work taking last-minute orders from customers to whom he just can
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

John Pierson’s ‘Split Screen’: FilmStruck Announces New Streaming Home For Seminal Television Series

John Pierson’s ‘Split Screen’: FilmStruck Announces New Streaming Home For Seminal Television Series
For two years back in the late nineties and early aughts, producer, author and all-around film lover John Pierson hit the road alongside his own group of fellow cinephiles to explore the filmmaking scene in a variety of venues and with a ton of exciting guests.

The venture resulted in his beloved television series “Split Screen,” which introduced movie buffs to all manner of filmmakers and their creations over the course of 60-plus episodes. “Split Screen” was IFCtv’s signature series from 1997-2000, boasting such guests as Spike Lee, Richard Linklater, Kevin Smith, Mary Harron, Katherine Dieckmann and many, many more.

Read More: Watch: ‘Jackie’ Director Pablo Larraín Discusses ‘Movies That Inspire Me’ in New IndieWire Video Series Presented by FilmStruck

While the series has long been available online in bits and pieces, it’s now bound for a brand new internet home, where it will be available in all its wild glory,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Pigeon Kings’ Follows the Inspirational Stars of the Sport of Pigeon Rolling

  • Indiewire
Here’s your daily dose of an indie film, web series, TV pilot, what-have-you in progress — at the end of the week, you’ll have the chance to vote for your favorite.

In the meantime: Is this a project you’d want to see? Tell us in the comments.

Pigeon Kings

Logline: A group of men in South Central Los Angeles find hope through their dedication to the rare sport of somersaulting pigeons.

Elevator Pitch:

Many have heard about pigeon coops and those raising pigeons in the inner cities of America, but many do not know why this subculture has emerged and what its purpose is. That is what “Pigeon Kings” wants to bring to light.

Through the story of these amazing men who have dedicated their lives to the little known sport of competitive rolling pigeons, we show not only this unique subculture but also a story of a
See full article at Indiewire »

The Most Dysfunctional Families in Cinema

The dysfunctional family has been an ever-present image in popular culture for decades: the battling husband and wife flanked by their bratty children are perhaps most frequently employed on garishly trite television sitcoms. In the movies, the gloves are ripped away and the reality shines on what is more often than not left unexposed in the darkness. What’s revealed seems to irrefutably prove that Tolstoy was absolutely correct when he wrote: “All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.”

Now playing in select theaters is Little Men, the newest film from director Ira Sachs, with whom we recently spoke to about its making. The plot follows two teenage boys in Brooklyn, NY who develop a budding friendship, despite the feuding of their parents over the lease of a local dress shop. The film is already receiving raves from critics, including our own review
See full article at The Film Stage »

Martha Thomases: Happy Holiday!

  • Comicmix
Today marks the beginning of Passover, the Jewish festival that celebrates our freedom from slavery in Egypt. It is also Earth Day, which means that zillions of rabbis have a head start on their sermon topic this week.

The first (and sometimes second) night of Passover is marked by the ritual meal, the seder, in which adults entertain children with the story of the escape from Egypt and the ensuing forty years in the desert. There are special foods that are supposed to bring to life the suffering of the slaves, and silly songs about goats and stuff to keep the kids engaged.

There is a special prayer book for the seder called the haggadah. Because Jews like nothing more than to argue with each other, there are zillions of different versions. There are haggadahs that are entirely in Hebrew, and some that are Hebrew and English … or Spanish or whatever language your family speaks.
See full article at Comicmix »

The 15 Greatest Animated Films That Aren’t For Children

The great Charlie Kaufman has made his first foray into the world of animation with the critically praised Anomalisa, which we named one of the best films of 2015. Finally expanding over the next few weeks, to celebrate, we’ve decided to look back at some of the finest animated films that one might not want to show the entire family.

Who said cartoons were just for kids? As this week’s list will demonstrate, some of the finest weren’t necessarily designed with undiscerning young audiences in mind. Crossing genres and styles, these fifteen amazing features should probably be watched after this kids have been put to bed. Of course, there are many great examples beyond these, so please suggest your own favorites in the comments.

Watership Down / The Plague Dogs (Martin Rosen)

Martin Rosen‘s dark adaptations of Richard Adams‘s classic novels, Watership Down and The Plague Dogs,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Cinematographer Maryse Alberti Talks Creed And Women In Film

Creed continues to be a box office success and a favorite with audiences and critics. Globally Ryan Coogler’s film has passed the $100 million mark since its initial opening this fall.

The film reunites Coogler with his Fruitvale Station star Michael B. Jordan as the son of Apollo Creed, and explores a new chapter in the Rocky story, starring Academy Award nominee Sylvester Stallone in his iconic role.

For the director, there was no question that Creed would be set in Philadelphia, where it all began. And for the filmmakers, there was no doubt that principal photography would be accomplished there as well. In order to bridge the two films artistically, Coogler brought together the talented creative team of costume designers Emma Potter (“Song One”) and Antoinette Messam (“Orphan”) and his “Fruitvale Station” team: editors Michael P. Shawver and Claudia Castello; production designer Hannah Beachler; and composer Ludwig Goransson.

To
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

“Found Footage with Style”: Cinematographer Maryse Alberti on M. Night Shyamalan’s The Visit

As a teenager in the south of France, Maryse Alberti’s first two trips to the cinema led her impressionable eyes to Duel and Harold and Maude. If she’d instead began her cinematic journey with The Barefoot Executive and Escape From the Planet of the Apes, maybe she wouldn’t have become the cinematographer of The Wrestler, Happiness, When We Were Kings and Crumb. But the combined spell cast by Steven Spielberg and Hal Ashby – the great populist entertainer and the iconoclastic humanist – set Albert on a path that has led to a four-decade career pivoting between documentary and fiction. Alberti’s latest straddles […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

“Found Footage with Style”: Cinematographer Maryse Alberti on M. Night Shyamalan’s The Visit

As a teenager in the south of France, Maryse Alberti’s first two trips to the cinema led her impressionable eyes to Duel and Harold and Maude. If she’d instead began her cinematic journey with The Barefoot Executive and Escape From the Planet of the Apes, maybe she wouldn’t have become the cinematographer of The Wrestler, Happiness, When We Were Kings and Crumb. But the combined spell cast by Steven Spielberg and Hal Ashby – the great populist entertainer and the iconoclastic humanist – set Albert on a path that has led to a four-decade career pivoting between documentary and fiction. Alberti’s latest straddles […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Groundbreaking Dp Maryse Alberti on Shooting 'Freeheld,' 'Creed' and 'The Visit'

  • Indiewire
Groundbreaking Dp Maryse Alberti on Shooting 'Freeheld,' 'Creed' and 'The Visit'
Along with Sandi Sissel, Ellen Kuras, Lisa Rinzler and Nancy Schreiber, Maryse Alberti was a groundbreaking female cinematographer at a time when the field was overwhelmingly male (more so than today). Even as more women have steadily entered the field, Alberti still stands out for her versatility and inventiveness. Since starting out in the late 1980s working on a short film with Christine Vachon, Alberti has worked steadily with some of the boldest directors of our time. She's shot a wide range of films, alternating between nonfiction and fiction, with directors including Todd Haynes ("Velvet Goldmine," "Poison"), Darren Aronofsky ("The Wrestler"), Terry Zwigoff ("Crumb"), Michael Apted ("Moving the Mountain," "Incident at Oglala") and Liz Garbus ("Love, Marilyn") and Amy Berg ("West of Memphis"), among others. She received Sundance Film Festival Best Cinematography honors for documentaries...
See full article at Indiewire »

50 Greatest Comic Book Movie Adaptations

When we asked our staff to vote on the best comic book movie adaptations, we were afraid the results would consist only of superhero films. While there are many superhero movies listed below, it is great to see a bulk of non-Hollywood films appearing on the list as well. We set out to compile a list of 50 movies but as it were, we ended up with 5 ties, and so the list consists 55 films instead. Let us know if you think we missed something. Enjoy!

****

55. The Adventures of Tintin

Spielberg’s first venture into animation is one of his best. Taking notes from the classic Raiders of the Lost Ark playbook, Spielberg crafted another spirited, thrilling, and always entertaining adventure. The Adventures of Tintin is one of the most pleasurable, family-friendly experiences, that boils down to one grand treasure hunt. There’s much to admire on-screen, but it is the spectacular
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The Top 25 Oscar Documentary Snubs of the Past 30 Years

By Anjelica Oswald

Managing Editor

After narrowing the Oscar documentary feature shortlist to five at the 87th Academy Award nominations Jan. 15, a number of notable exclusions were featured, particularly Al Hicks‘ Keep on Keepin’ On, which documents the mentorship and friendship of a jazz legend and a blind piano prodigy, and Steve James‘ Life Itself, about the life and career of famed film critic Roger Ebert. (James is no stranger to snubs and the exclusion of his 1994 film Hoop Dreams led to rule reform within the documentary category.) Both films hold 97 percent positive ratings on Rotten Tomatoes.

Some films surprised when they didn’t even land a spot on the shortlist, such as Red Army, which examines the rise and fall of the Soviet Union’s hockey team from the perspective of its coach. That film holds a 100 percent positive rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

In light of these best documentary feature snubs,
See full article at Scott Feinberg »
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