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Reese Witherspoon movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Legally Blonde,’ ‘Election,’ ‘Walk the Line’

Reese Witherspoon movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Legally Blonde,’ ‘Election,’ ‘Walk the Line’
A New Orleans native who was raised in Tennessee, Reese Witherspoon is the very definition of good things coming in petite 5-foot-1 packages. She made her film debut at age 14 in 1991’s “The Man in the Moon,” a bittersweet Southern coming-of-age tale of first love and loss. From then on, she was pegged as a young actress to watch. She would soon gravitate towards edgier fare such as the underwhelming 1994 comedy “S.F.W.” and 1996’s “Freeway,” a rancid take on a Little Red Riding Hood on the run. She then scored a signature role as the rabidly ruthless high-school over-achiever Tracy Flick in 1999’s political satire “Election.” That was followed by her first major box-office hit, 2001’s “Legally Blonde,” as a perky Harvard student with a penchant for pink, feathered pens and cute Chihuahuas.

SEEOscar Best Actress Gallery: Every Winner in Academy Award History

Ever since, Witherspoon has proven to be
See full article at Gold Derby »

Reese Witherspoon movies: 12 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Reese Witherspoon movies: 12 greatest films ranked from worst to best
A New Orleans native who was raised in Tennessee, Reese Witherspoon is the very definition of good things coming in petite 5-foot-1 packages. She made her film debut at age 14 in 1991’s “The Man in the Moon,” a bittersweet Southern coming-of-age tale of first love and loss. From then on, she was pegged as a young actress to watch. She would soon gravitate towards edgier fare such as the underwhelming 1994 comedy “S.F.W.” and 1996’s “Freeway,” a rancid take on a Little Red Riding Hood on the run. She then scored a signature role as the rabidly ruthless high-school over-achiever Tracy Flick in 1999’s political satire “Election.” That was followed by her first major box-office hit, 2001’s “Legally Blonde,” as a perky Harvard student with a penchant for pink, feathered pens and cute Chihuahuas.

Ever since, Witherspoon has proven to be a incredibly likable and laudable presence on the big screen and,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Gwar frontman Dave Brockie found dead in Virginia home

  • Hitfix
Gwar frontman Dave Brockie found dead in Virginia home
Richmond, Va. (AP) — Dave Brockie, who as "Oderus Urungus" fronted the alien-costumed heavy metal band Gwar during graphic and fake-blood-soaked stage shows for more than three decades, has died. He was 50. Officers were called to Brockie's home Sunday evening and found the singer dead inside the home, Richmond police spokeswoman Dionne Waugh said Monday. Detectives don't suspect foul play at this time and the medical examiner's office will determine cause of death, Waugh said. The band founded in 1984 is known for its comically grotesque costumes, stage antics and vulgar lyrics. Gwar was nominated for a Grammy Award for best long-form music video in 1993 for "Phallus in Wonderland" but lost to "Diva" by Annie Lennox. It also was nominated for best metal performance for "S.F.W." in 1996 but lost to "Happiness In Slavery" by Nine Inch Nails. Randy Blythe, the lead vocalist for Virginia-based metal band Lamb of God, fondly recalled
See full article at Hitfix »

Tiff’s 25 Years of Midnight Madness: Best of the Fest #2

Tiff’s Midnight Madness program turned 25 this year, and for two and half decades, the hardworking programers have gathered some of the strangest, most terrifying, wild, intriguing and downright entertaining films from around the world. From dark comedies to Japanese gore-fests and indie horror gems, the Midnight Madness program hasn’t lost its edge as one the leading showcases of genre cinema. In its 25-year history, Midnight Madness has introduced adventurous late-night moviegoers to such cult faves as Richard Linklater’s Dazed and Confused and Quentin Tarantino’s Reservoir Dogs. But what separates Midnight Madness from, say, Montreal’s three and half week long genre festival Fantasia, is that Tiff selects only ten films to make the cut. In other words, these programmers don’t mess around. Last week I decided that I would post reviews of my personal favourite films that screened in past years. And just like the Tiff programmers,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Best Movie Ever?: "Election"

Hey there! Please vote. Votey votey vote.

Now that you've voted, let's remember something important: There is nothing more depressing than a movie that wants to convey the melodrama of high school and fails. I hate, hate, hate bad high school movies. Every time I watch one, it feels like a lazy distortion or an insult to my own high school memories, of which I'm very protective. Is it really that hard to write about high school as something more than a popularity contest? I'm asking you, the screenwriter of She's All That. Because I think of ages 14-18 as a time of great self-realization, self-definition, and fun. There are spurts of trauma too, but the idea that high schools are divided squarely into winners and losers is bizarre and dumb. One movie that gets it right is Election, Alexander Payne's 1999 satire that centers around a student council election,
See full article at The Backlot »

'Devil's Knott' Just Got Family Friendly. That's Kinda Lame.

'Devil's Knott' Just Got Family Friendly. That's Kinda Lame.
While she once was an edgy upcoming starlette (Freeway, American Psycho, Fear and S.F.W.), Reese Witherspoon is now a family friendly actress that stars in movies like Four Christmases, Monsters vs Aliens, Vanity Fair and Legally Blonde. It's weird announcing her addition to Atom Egoyan's West Memphis Three drama Devil's Knott. It makes me nervous. The pic is based on investigative reporter Mara Leveritt's 2003 book "Devil's Knot: The True Story of the West Memphis Three," which chronicled the prolonged murder trial of defendants Damien Echols, Jason Baldwin and Jessie Misskelley Jr., who served 18 years in prison before being released in August. The trio were accused of killing Christopher Byers, Michael Moore and Stevie Branch, three 8-year-old boys who were found brutally murdered and hog-tied in a wooded area of West Memphis, Arkansas known as Robin Hood Hills.
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »

Stephen Dorff Talks 'Somewhere,' Career Ups And Downs

'I thought I was a sell-out, playing a vampire,' the actor says about his memorable role in 'Blade.'

By Kara Warner, with reporting by Josh Horowitz

Stephen Dorff

Photo: MTV News

Although his role in "Somewhere" was one of the most challenging of his career, Stephen Dorff is grateful to writer/director Sofia Coppola for giving him the opportunity to play a character who is a complete departure from the menacing, murderous types audiences are used to seeing him portray.

When MTV News caught up with the actor, he explained that "Somewhere" is the kind of independent art film he was most interested in at the start of his career — which has spanned more than two decades — but when Hollywood started calling, he reluctantly veered into bigger films playing bad boys and villains.

"[After the 1992 coming-of-age drama 'Power of One,'] Hollywood was coming to me, but I was kind of resisting," Dorff said of
See full article at MTV Movie News »

Stephen Dorff Talks 'Somewhere,' Career Ups And Downs

'I thought I was a sell-out, playing a vampire,' the actor says about his memorable role in 'Blade.'

By Kara Warner, with reporting by Josh Horowitz

Stephen Dorff

Photo: MTV News

Although his role in "Somewhere" was one of the most challenging of his career, Stephen Dorff is grateful to writer/director Sofia Coppola for giving him the opportunity to play a character who is a complete departure from the menacing, murderous types audiences are used to seeing him portray.

When MTV News caught up with the actor, he explained that "Somewhere" is the kind of independent art film he was most interested in at the start of his career — which has spanned more than two decades — but when Hollywood started calling, he reluctantly veered into bigger films playing bad boys and villains.

"[After the 1992 coming-of-age drama 'Power of One,'] Hollywood was coming to me, but I was kind of resisting," Dorff said of
See full article at MTV Movie News »

Stephen Dorff Talks 'Somewhere,' Career Ups And Downs

'I thought I was a sell-out, playing a vampire,' the actor says about his memorable role in 'Blade.'

By Kara Warner, with reporting by Josh Horowitz

Stephen Dorff

Photo: MTV News

Although his role in "Somewhere" was one of the most challenging of his career, Stephen Dorff is grateful to writer/director Sofia Coppola for giving him the opportunity to play a character who is a complete departure from the menacing, murderous types audiences are used to seeing him portray.

When MTV News caught up with the actor, he explained that "Somewhere" is the kind of independent art film he was most interested in at the start of his career — which has spanned more than two decades — but when Hollywood started calling, he reluctantly veered into bigger films playing bad boys and villains.

"[After the 1992 coming-of-age drama 'Power of One,'] Hollywood was coming to me, but I was kind of resisting," Dorff said of
See full article at MTV Music News »

DVD Playhouse--November 2009

DVD Playhouse—November 2009

By

Allen Gardner

Watchmen—The Ultimate Cut (Warner Bros.) Director Zack Snyder’s film of Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ landmark graphic novel is as worthy an adaptation of a great book that has ever been filmed. In an alternative version of the year 1985, Richard Nixon is serving his third term as President and super heroes have been outlawed by a congressional act, in spite of the fact that two of the most high-profile “masks,” Dr. Manhattan (Billy Cruddup) and The Comedian (Jeffrey Dean Morgan) helped the U.S. win the Vietnam War. When The Comedian is found murdered, many former heroes become concerned that a conspiracy is afoot to assassinate retired costumed crime fighters. Former masks Nite Owl (Patrick Wilson), Silk Spectre (Malin Akerman) and still-operating Rorschach (Jackie Earle Haley, in an Oscar-worthy turn) launch an investigation of their own, all while the Pentagon’s “Doomsday
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

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