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NYC Weekend Watch: Machiko Kyō, Abbas Kiarostami, Godzilla & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

Films by Mizoguchi, Kurosawa, and Naruse kick off a retrospective of Japanese actress Machiko Kyō.

The Pasolini retrospective continues.

Streetwise and its follow-up, Tiny: The Life of Erin Blackwell, begin a run.

The restoration of A Bigger Splash continues screening, while the ’90s indie film Chalk has been restored.

Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Abbas Kiarostami: A Retrospective’ Trailer: Janus Films Unveils Wide-Ranging Restoration

‘Abbas Kiarostami: A Retrospective’ Trailer: Janus Films Unveils Wide-Ranging Restoration
Three years after Palme d’Or-winning Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami passed away at the age of 76, Janus Films is rolling out a wide-ranging and lovingly designed touring retrospective of some of his seminal works. The new retrospective includes restorations of The Koker Trilogy, plus features like “Close-Up,” “Taste of Cherry,” “Shirin,” “24 Frames,” “ABC Africa,” “The Wind Will Carry Us,” “Ten,” and “Five.”

The new restorations were undertaken by the Criterion Collection and mk2 with contributions by Kiarostami’s son, Ahmad Kiarostami.

Born in 1940 in Tehran, the filmmaker first studied painting at the University of Tehran; later, he worked as a graphic designer and commercial director. Kiarostami credited a job in the film department at Kanun (the Centre for the Intellectual Development of Children and Young Adults) for shaping him into a filmmaker.

He made his first feature, “The Report,” in 1977, just two years before the 1979 revolution that saw so
See full article at Indiewire »

The Best Movie Trilogies Ever Made — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best Movie Trilogies Ever Made — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of “The Trip to Spain,” what is the best movie trilogy?

Richard Brody (@tnyfrontrow), The New Yorker

Far be it from me to choose between Antonioni’s non-trilogy “L’Avventura,” “La Notte,” and “L’Eclisse” and Kiarostami’s explicitly-denied “Koker” trilogy of “Where Is the Friend’s Home?,” “Life and Nothing More,” and “Through the Olive Trees” (and I’m tempted to make a trilogy of trilogies with Carl Theodor Dreyer’s “Day of Wrath,” “Ordet,” and “Gertrud”), but if I put Kiarostami’s films first, it’s because he puts their very creation into the action. Reflexivity isn’t a
See full article at Indiewire »

79 Movies to See Before You Die, According to the Dardenne Brothers

79 Movies to See Before You Die, According to the Dardenne Brothers
Any list of the greatest foreign directors currently working today has to include Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne. The directors first rose to prominence in the mid 1990s with efforts like “The Promise” and “Rosetta,” and they’ve continued to excel in the 21st century with titles such as “The Kid With A Bike” and “Two Days One Night,” which earned Marion Cotillard a Best Actress Oscar nomination.

Read MoreThe Dardenne Brothers’ Next Film Will Be a Terrorism Drama

The directors will be back in U.S. theaters with the release of “The Unknown Girl” on September 8, which is a long time coming considering the film first premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016. While you continue to wait for their new movie, the brothers have provided their definitive list of 79 movies from the 20th century that you must see. La Cinetek published the list in full and is hosting many
See full article at Indiewire »

Abbas Kiarostami’s ’24 Frames’ Is A Moving Farewell From A Legendary Filmmaker — Cannes 2017 Report

Abbas Kiarostami’s ’24 Frames’ Is A Moving Farewell From A Legendary Filmmaker — Cannes 2017 Report
Abbas Kiarostami, the great Iranian postmodernist who died last summer at the age of 76, used to say that he preferred the kind of movies that put their audience to sleep. “Some films have made me doze off in the theater,” he would explain, “but the same films have made me stay up at night, wake up thinking about them in the morning, and keep on thinking about them for for weeks.” So while I passed out (and passed out hard) roughly 15 minutes into “24 Frames,” the fascinating, posthumously completed non-narrative project that will serve as Kiarostami’s final farewell, I suspect that he wouldn’t take my unconsciousness as a criticism or a show of disrespect.

On the contrary, I imagine that he would have been delighted to see the dozens of nodding heads that dotted the film’s final Cannes screening, where the narcotic quality of Kiarostami’s cinema was
See full article at Indiewire »

Abbas Kiarostami to be honoured at Busan fest

  • ScreenDaily
Abbas Kiarostami to be honoured at Busan fest
Iranian director, who passed away on July 4, will have a retrospective of his works screened at Biff.

The late Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami will be named Asian Filmmaker of the Year at the forthcoming Busan International Film Festival (Biff) (Oct 6-15).

The Palme d’Or winning director of Taste Of Cherry, who passed away July 4, had a “close relationship” with Biff, said executive programmer Kim Ji-seok.

The auteur’s son Ahmad Kiarostami will accept the award on his behalf at the Biff opening ceremony on October 6.

The festival will screen nine of his films including those in the Koker trilogy: Where Is The Friend’s Home? (1987), And Life Goes On (1992) and Through The Olive Trees (1994).

“He came to the festival several times, the first being for our second edition in 1997. He was head of the New Currents jury in 2005 and the dean of the Asian Film Academy in 2010. After we opened the Busan Cinema Center, he came and
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Watch Martin Scorsese’s Rememberance of Abbas Kiarostami, an ‘Elegant, Eloquent’ Friend

Watch Martin Scorsese’s Rememberance of Abbas Kiarostami, an ‘Elegant, Eloquent’ Friend
Among the many filmmakers mourning Abbas Kiarostami is Martin Scorsese, who over the weekend delivered a 12-minute remembrance at New York City’s School of Visual Arts. Scorsese, who’s long stood out as one of Hollywood’s most eclectic, devoted cinephiles, was a friend of the revered Iranian filmmaker for more than a decade and said during his remarks that he was “still prepping for the meeting next year” that the two planned to have. Kiarostami died on July 4 at the age of 76.

Read More: Abbas Kiarostami Remembered: Why He Was Iran’s Essential Filmmaker — Critic’s Notebook

Scorsese recalls first meeting Kiarostami at the Cannes Film Festival while both serving on the Cinéfondation jury, which he was “a little cautious” for, as the icon of Iranian cinema’s reputation preceded him. Once meeting him, Scorsese found Kiarostami to be “elegant, eloquent, very quiet, very careful with his words
See full article at Indiewire »

Abbas Kiarostami’s Body Returns to Tehran, Iranian Filmmakers and Artists Gather to Pay Tribute

Abbas Kiarostami’s Body Returns to Tehran, Iranian Filmmakers and Artists Gather to Pay Tribute
The film world has been mourning Abbas Kiarostami this week, and on Friday the filmmaker’s body was returned to his birthplace of Tehran. Kiarostami, who won the Palme d’Or in 1997 for “Taste of Cherry,” died of cancer last Monday, July 4 at his home in Paris; he was 76 at the time of his passing and had been an icon of world cinema for decades.

Read More: Abbas Kiarostami Remembered: Why He Was Iran’s Essential Filmmaker — Critic’s Notebook

His sons Ahmad and Bahman attended a funeral service in Paris on Friday, but Ahmad was unable to travel to Iran due to security concerns related to his involvement in dissident organizations. He asked all those who were able to attend that, “if you are going to say goodbye to my father, wear your best attire that would be appropriate for a celebration of my father’s productive and creative life.
See full article at Indiewire »

Jafar Panahi Remembers Abbas Kiarostami: ‘His Vision Will Live Forever’

Jafar Panahi Remembers Abbas Kiarostami: ‘His Vision Will Live Forever’
Editor’s note: With the death of renowned Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami over the weekend, IndieWire has been reaching out to some of his friends and collaborators to reflect on his significance. The following thoughts from fellow Iranian director Jafar Panahi — who is currently restricted to traveling within the country and banned from filmmaking by his government — were provided to IndieWire by way of journalist and translator Jamsheed Akrami. Panahi’s most recent film, “Taxi,” was released last year.

Mr. Kiarostami, My Teacher

My most vivid recollection of all the years I spent with Mr. Kiarostami is probably the first one. As an aspiring filmmaker, I desperately wanted to work with him. When I learned he was in preproduction for “Through the Olive Trees,” I just picked up the phone and left him a message saying that I was a film graduate employed by the Iranian Television and was interested
See full article at Indiewire »

Watch: Abbas Kiarostami Reflects On His Life & Career In Two-Hour Tiff ‘In Conversation’ Interview

Watch: Abbas Kiarostami Reflects On His Life & Career In Two-Hour Tiff ‘In Conversation’ Interview
The Palme d’Or-winning director Abbas Kiarostami passed away on July 4 and since then many industry members have expressed their condolences and remembered the Iranian filmmaker and his great work. Now, The Toronto Film Festival has shared a recent two-hour “In Conversation With” video where the “Taste of Cherry” helmer joined Tiff Director & CEO Piers Handling for an intimate onstage conversation.

A true master of world cinema, the writer and director is known for acclaimed films such as “The Wind Will Carry Us” and “Certified Copy.” In the video Kiarostami talks about his life, career and his exhibition “Doors Without Keys.”

Read More: Abbas Kiarostami, Palme d’Or-Winning Director Of ‘Taste Of Cherry’ And ‘Certified Copy,’ Dies At 76

This past winter, Tiff Bell Lightbox hosted a career retrospective on the director who made this first feature, “The Report,” in 1977. He is remembered for many hit films, including his Koker trilogy,
See full article at Indiewire »

Moments of truth by Anne-Katrin Titze

Richard Peña on Abbas Kiarostami:"It was such a privilege to know him, and more of a pleasure. Simply one of the great artists of our time." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The last time I spoke with Abbas Kiarostami, who died on Monday, July 4, 2016 in Paris, was when he presented Like Someone In Love, starring Tadashi Okuno and Rin Takanashi at the New York Film Festival in 2012. The director of Ten, Certified Copy, Through The Olive Trees and the Cannes Palme d’Or winning Taste of Cherry also co-wrote Jafar Panahi's The White Balloon and Crimson Gold.

At the press conference for Like Someone In Love, moderated by Richard Peña, I commented to him how very much Yasujiro Ozu is present as absence in his film - through the grandmother, the neighbour, the people talked about and unseen. There is a mother with her two children in Halloween costumes,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Ramin Bahrani Remembers Abbas Kiarostami: ‘Life Is Not a Straight Line’

Ramin Bahrani Remembers Abbas Kiarostami: ‘Life Is Not a Straight Line’
Editor’s note: Filmmaker Ramin Bahrani has been a major presence in American independent film since his 2005 debut, “Man Push Cart.” His most recent film, “99 Homes,” was released last year. The filmmaker’s style in his early work is heavily influenced by the late Abbas Kiarostami, with whom Bahrani formed a relationship over the course of his career. With the news of Kiarostami’s death at the age of 76, Bahrani shared the following tribute to his longtime mentor.

When I saw “Where is the Friend’s House?” as a teenager, my path as a burgeoning filmmaker was irrevocably altered. I immediately tracked down VHS copies (badly dubbed, pirated) of “Close Up” and “Life and Nothing Else…” and watched them in my hometown of Winston-Salem, Nc, wondering how the prosaic can be revealed with such a profound depth of poetry. Can cinema be like this?

See MoreAbbas Kiarostami Remembered: Why He
See full article at Indiewire »

Abbas Kiarostami Remembered: Why He Was Iran’s Essential Filmmaker — Critic’s Notebook

Abbas Kiarostami Remembered: Why He Was Iran’s Essential Filmmaker — Critic’s Notebook
One of the most interesting collisions of the public perception of Iran’s Islamic state and its reality is how, out of an apparently repressive state hostile to the creative arts, Abbas Kiarostami became the essential free filmmaker. “Freedom” is always a relative term when it comes to cinema, which, like politics, unfortunately runs on money. But it’s easy to spot the genuinely free filmmakers when they come along. Despite their varying struggles to get their movies made, the work that results is directly personal and unbound by prevailing cultural trends and diktats. They range from Jean Vigo to Kidlat Tahimik, Pedro Costa to Shirley Clarke, Stan Brakhage to Jose Luis Guerin. Kiarostami was the free filmmaker par excellence, since he managed to find his ever-developing acute approach to modernism through whatever system in which he might find himself working.

Read More: Abbas Kiarostami, Palme d’Or-Winning Director Of
See full article at Indiewire »

Abbas Kiarostami, Palme d’Or-Winning Director Of ‘Taste Of Cherry’ And ‘Certified Copy,’ Dies At 76

Abbas Kiarostami, Palme d’Or-Winning Director Of ‘Taste Of Cherry’ And ‘Certified Copy,’ Dies At 76
Palme d’Or-winning Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami, best known for films like “Taste of Cherry” (which earned him the Cannes accolade in 1997), “Close-Up” and “Certified Copy,” has died. He was 76.

The news was first reported by the Iranian Students’ New Agency (Isna) on Monday afternoon, who wrote “Abbas Kiarostami, who had travelled to France for treatment, has died.” Other news outlets, including The Guardian, have also begun reporting the news.

Born in 1940 in Tehran, the filmmaker first studied painting at the University of Tehran; later, he worked as a graphic designer and commercial director. Kiarostami credited a job in the film department at Kanun (the Centre for the Intellectual Development of Children and Young Adults) for shaping him into a filmmaker.

He made his first feature, “The Report,” in 1977, just two years before the 1979 revolution that saw so many of his creative peers leave the country. Kiarostami, however, stayed and
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Very Big Shot’ Makes Very Big impact with its Powerful Take on Politics and Crime

In the spirit of fun and satire as only the Lebanese can do it (think Nadine Labaki), “ Very Big Shot” (Lebanon, Qatar; 2015) takes an unexpected twist from its initial drug heist opening to its anti-hero protagonist grasping the power of the image of media and ultimately spinning into the power of image in politics. This romp brings to mind 2012 Toronto Film Festival’s “Seven Boxes” (“7 Cajas”) which sold very well internationally.

The comedic mask covers a lot more for the audience to either pick up on or just to enjoy for what it is: a well told fun and funny story. The story has a particular Lebanese flavor and it began in a particular community which has drug dealers and violence and fanatics, but it moves into more universal contradictions between what is real, what is fiction as depicted in the movie being made within the film we are watching and how fiction becomes political fodder.

“ Very Big Shot “depicts the lives of three brothers – Jad, who is just coming out of prison after serving five years for a crime committed by his elder brother Ziad, and their middle brother Joe. A delivery for a local crime ring spins out of control and Ziad seizes the opportunity to make a fortune.

That “Very Big Shot” was made by three brothers and actually stars an actor who, after coming out of prison for manslaughter could not find other employment, makes this movie more nuanced than most audiences would imagine.

The directorial debut of Mir-Jean Bou Chaaya, who worked with his two brothers, Christian Bou Chaaya and Lucien Bou Chaaya, “Very Big Shot” started out as a short and received such positive attention and critical acclaim at several international festivals, that the idea of developing it into a full-fledged feature film was born.

The feature film project received support both from the region and international talent, giving the Arab world a powerful film on organized crime and the political nexus.

Earning tremendous acclaim at its screening at the third Ajyal Youth Film Festival, “Very Big Shot” is a dark comedy that pans the camera on Lebanese society, tackling multiple layers of the society. Says director Mir-Jan, “in Lebanon there is no separation between social life and political life and the scenario reflects that”.

It is co-written by Mir-Jean Bou Chaaya and Alain Saadeh, who also stars in the film. The three Bou Chaaya Brothers combine financial know-how of brother Lucien who was (and still is) an investment attorney in Paris before turning his attention to raising financing for this film and talent; director Mir-Jean and actor producer Christian, a real-life restaurant owner which reflects directly on this film where the three fictitious brothers make a living running their father’s legacy, a pizza take-out place. In real-life one of the three brothers would always keep the others going in the face of obstacles which are inevitable for first time filmmakers.

We sat and spoke with the three brothers and actors Alain Saadi,Fouad Yammine, and Alexandra Kahwagi

Sydney at SydneysBuzz: One of my favorite scenes was when the woman’s scarf was snatched off of her in the movie scene being shot within the actual movie and how locals believed it was real and joined the staged fight. It was very much like neorealism in “The Bicycle Thief” when what was being shot on film as a mob stopping the thief was amplified by real citizens joining in and actually beating up the thief/ actor.

Mir-Jean: In the short, the film was shot in the street and a fifty, fifty-five year old woman saw the Muslim woman and the Christian man fighting and entered the scene and slapped the actor and so we put the scarf scene in the movie as well.

What are your favorite movies about movie making?

Mir-Jean: De Sica’s “After the Fox”, Woody Allen’s “Crimes and Misdemeanors”, Truffaut’s “Day for Night”, Kiarostami’s “Through the Olive Trees” , “ Living in Oblivion”. Reality and fiction is a very interesting subject, but the power of the image was the key in our film, not the making a movie within a movie.

It’s funny, “Argo” premiered in 2012 when the short was also showing. “Argo” won an Oscar and the short was compared to it.

Alexandra Kahwagi : “Living in Oblivion” and “Singing in the Rain” are my favorites.

Alain Saadeh, how do you play the characters you play?

I work from within. As a kid, I liked the sort of tough guy character. I wanted to be like a tough guy in our family. There is a neighborhood in Lebanon where they say, “Don’t make trouble, just shoot him and go home”. But aside from liking that kind of character, to get to the human side, you have to be open minded to your own inner motivations as well.

Being true to yourself leaves no room for imitation.

Mir-Jean: I tried to be true to the milieu and therefore used the same street lingo without any modification to lend the film an authentic feel. The participation of Marcel Ghanem, multi-award winning television host, helped raise the profile of the movie as well as give confidence to the cast and crew.

We did not interfere with the actors and gave them total freedom, thus giving them the space to deliver a nuanced performance.

It seemed like an anachronism to be using “film” in the movie.

The use of film in the movie was a gesture to pay homage to George Nasser, the first Lebanese in the Cannes Film Festival.

The ending seemed rather sudden and I didn’t quite understand it…

There were three endings to this movie. One was a well-developed one but this was not convincing. It was about the ultimate form of manipulation, therefore the screen went to black. The story really ends at the airport, but the movie ending as it was, was more important than the ending of the story itself. There was a transformation of the character who, in being true to himself, discovers the power of image and the power of media. He had to become either a lobbyist or a politician. The ending also said something about the nature of politics in Lebanon.

What about the film’s distribution?

After “Very Big Shot” premiered in Toronto this fall, word of mouth was good but no international sales agent was on board to make deals for these first time filmmakers. B for Film picked it up for international representation and it went on to play in Talinn and London Film Festivals.

Here in Doha, Qatar, we were thrilled by the audience’s strong and positive reception. “Very Big Shot” looks like it could do very well at the box office, not only in the Middle East and North Africa where it will be distributed by Front Row after playing Dubai and Marrakesh Film Festivals. It has already been released in Lebanon November 19 to very good attendance considering it has no names. It opened in the top four (against three Hollywood blockbusters) which proves that people are interested in home-grown cinema.

The film will earn returns on sales in North America, Europe and Latin America as well for those loving a good (if foreign-language) caper with a view into Lebanon today (did you know there has not been a president there for 18 months?).

How did you go about financing the film?

Lucien: The biggest challenge for unknown new talents is finding finance and the platform to take the film to a global audience. We thank Doha Film Institute for its support to the film and Ajyal Youth Film Festival for screening it and supporting the emerging talent.

When the short was first seen in Abu Dhabi, an investor associated with Doha came in to help and that was how we became a Doha Film Institute grant recipient. Doha’s support did more than give us the first monies; it made us count in the international film community.

I knew every financial detail had to be transparent to create a comfort zone for investors. I furnished a completion bond and a detailed budget. Four Lebanese expats in Paris invested to support Lebanese film.

Well known music composer Michel Elefterides was one of its first investors which also gave credence to the film. He had liked the short and saw its potential. He also discovered two musicians, the Chehade Brothers who played in the film and who are now best sellers in Lebanon.

The film gained from the international collaboration that came from writer George Nasser whose 1957 film “Whither?” was the only Lebanese film to make it to Cannes Film Festival and Yves Angelo. They brought Hollywood and French cinematic sensibility to the production.

This combination helped us to create a powerful script and a movie that resonates with the global audience.

We are also seeking to support filmmakers and film industry in Lebanon and the Arab World through our institute SuppAr-the Arab Art Support Group.” The Arab Art Support Group gives us and other filmmakers a support system to raise money in a sustainable, ongoing way. In effect it is a financial company created to support the arts.
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

Blu-ray, DVD Release: The Wind Will Carry Us

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: July 22, 2014

Price: DVD $29.98, Blu-ray $39.98

Studio: Cohen Media

The great Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami’s (Certified Copy) acclaimed 1999 drama The Wind Will Carry Us arrives as a digitally remastered release on Blu-ray and DVD, an “acknowledgement” of the film’s 15th anniversary that marks its Blu-ray debut.

The Wind Will Carry Us film follows the changes in the daily routines of the inhabitants of a mountain village after a small group of outsiders arrives, claiming to be “communication engineers.” As the deceptive story unfolds, we learn that the mysterious strangers are on a secret mission: They are a television crew sent from Tehran to await the death of an old woman in order to cover the funeral practices of the village. But the village operates on its own schedule, forcing the TV crew to remain much longer than planned. The leader of the crew (Behzad Dorani) winds
See full article at Disc Dish »

Abbas Kiarostami to head Cinéfondation and Short Films Jury at Cannes

Abbas Kiarostami to head Cinéfondation and Short Films Jury at Cannes
Abbas Kiarostami

The 2014 Cinéfondation and Short Films Jury at the Cannes film festival will be headed by acclaimed Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami.

He will be accompanied by French director, screenwriter and actress Noémie Lvovsky, Brazilian director and visual artist Daniela Thomas, Chadian director Mahamat-Saleh Haroun and Nowegian director Joachim Trier.

They will be tasked with awarding three prizes to films submitted by students from film schools the world over, which will be presented in the Cinéfondation Selection, to be announced at a later date.

The Jury will also decide the Short Film Palme d’or to be awarded in the award ceremony on May 24.

Kiarostami has presented a number of his films at Cannes, including five in Competition: Through the Olive Trees (1994), Taste of Cherry (Palme d’or 1997), Ten (2002), Certified Copy (2010) and Like Someone in Love (2012).
See full article at DearCinema.com »

Kiarostami to lead Cannes short jury

  • ScreenDaily
Kiarostami to lead Cannes short jury
Abbas Kiarostami is to head the Cinéfondation and Short Film Jury of the 67th Cannes Film Festival.

The Iranian director and screenwriter has been nominated for the Palme d’Or five times and won in 1997 with Taste of Cherry.

The 2014 Cinéfondation and Short Films Jury will also include directors Noémie Lvovsky (France), Daniela Thomas (Brazil), Mahamat-Saleh Haroun (Chad), and Joachim Trier (Norway).

They will be tasked with awarding three prizes to films submitted by students from film schools around the world, which will be presented in the Cinéfondation Selection, to be announced at a later date.

The Cinéfondation Prizes will be announced by the Jury on May 22, at a ceremony to be followed by a screening of the winning films.

The Jury will also decide the Short Film Palme d’or to be awarded at the prize-giving ceremony on May 24.

Kiarostami rose to international fame with Where is the Friend’s Home (1987) and went on to present
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Kiarostami to give Cartagena masterclass

  • ScreenDaily
Kiarostami to give Cartagena masterclass
Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami will give a masterclass at the 54th edition of the International Film Festival of Cartagena de Indias –Ficci.

Cartagena’s festival, which runs March 13-19, will also feature a retrospective of his work.

His films to be screened include Taste of Cherry (1997); The Wind Will Carry Us (1999); Shirín (2008); Ten (2002); Ten by Ten (2004); Certified Copy (2010); Close Up (1990); Where is the Friend’s Home? (1987); Life Goes on (1992) and Through the Olive Trees (1994).

These screenings will make his work better known to the Colombian public; his films have never been shown commercially in Colombia before.

His visit to Cartagena is sponsored by the University of Magdalena and made possible thanks to producer Blackfactory Cinema in alliance with Medio de Contención Productions, companies that will organize the workshop “Filming in Colombia with Abbas Kiarostami” in Bogotá from March 3-12 at the Centro ÁTICO of the Universidad Javeriana of Bogota.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes 2013: 'The Past,' the new film by the director of 'A Separation,' confirms Asghar Farhadi as a modern master

Cannes 2013: 'The Past,' the new film by the director of 'A Separation,' confirms Asghar Farhadi as a modern master
If you had gone to see every single one of the acclaimed movies from Iran that have played in the U.S. since the mid-’90s — the lyrically subdued Abbas Kiarostami films, like Through the Olive Trees and Taste of Cherry, that were hailed at the time as minimalist masterpieces; the feminist political parable The Circle; scrappy fables like The White Balloon, Children of Heaven, and A Time for Drunken Horses; the enchantingly colorful woven rug of a movie Gabbeh — it would be perfectly reasonable for you to come away from that experience thinking that Iran is a land of
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »
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