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Harrison: Cry of the City (1996)

Harrison is an ex-Scotland yard detective hired to save an ex-convict accused of killing a New York cop. Harrison prowls the Big Apple by day and night seeking the answers to his mysterious... See full summary »

Director:

James Frawley

Writer:

Michael Gleason
Reviews
Nominated for 1 Primetime Emmy. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Harvey Atkin ... Hotel clerk
Jude Ciccolella ... Macklin
Tony De Santis ... Jim Lefferts
Cynthia Harris ... Helen Lovett
Elva Mai Hoover
Felicity Huffman ... Peggy Macklin
Elizabeth Hurley ... Cecilia Harrison
Michael A. Miranda Michael A. Miranda ... Supporting
Robert Montano ... Octavio Ruiz
Jeffrey Nordling ... Frank
Edward Woodward ... Edward 'Teddy' Harrison
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Storyline

Harrison is an ex-Scotland yard detective hired to save an ex-convict accused of killing a New York cop. Harrison prowls the Big Apple by day and night seeking the answers to his mysterious case, but more importantly the answer to the question "Why isn't the New York Police Department investigating the case?" Written by David Kinne <davros@gargoyle.apana.org.au>

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Genres:

Crime | Drama | Mystery

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

27 February 1996 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Grito en la noche See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »

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User Reviews

Too Bad
24 February 2002 | by rmax304823See all my reviews

It's too bad about this movie. It promises much more than it delivers. The plot ought to be interesting but isn't. The story progresses from scene to scene, sometimes outdoors (the picture was shot partly in New York)and sometimes indoors. But it doesn't matter. Each scene is flatly layed out and consists of a conversation between Harrison, a retired Scotland Yard cop, and somebody else, usually some street crumb. The dialogue has no lilt. There is no humor, except in the occasional wisecrack from Edward Woodward as the cop, and sometimes the wisecracks overreach themselves. Woodward himself is adequate. If you close your eyes he begins to sound like Michael Caine. Alas, he's given nothing to work with here. And he gave an astonishing performance in "The Wicker Man," a terrifying and mythologically informed film that's not to be missed. Even Elizabeth Hurley's presence can't justify watching this. She's mesmerizingly beautiful, true, a kind of darker, more BRUNETTE Jacqueline Bisset, without the incredible eyes. Hurley is Woodward's daughter, about to be married to a cop who resents Woodward's intrusion into the prosecution of a cop killer. And if his future son-in-law protests Woodward's nosiness, the kid's colleagues are positively hostile, sometimes physically so. On the whole the film runs like the pilot for a TV series that was never produced. What a waste.


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