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Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and 10 Other Adaptations That Jane Austen Never Would Have Anticipated

  • PEOPLE.com
Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and 10 Other Adaptations That Jane Austen Never Would Have Anticipated
The love story of Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy has been told again and again onscreen, and each adaptation has in its own way addressed themes of class, social etiquette and romance that Jane Austen wove into the 1813 classic, Pride and Prejudice. But now Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, in theaters Feb. 5, introduces a whole new slew of themes: the undead, for example, and martial arts and lots and lots of blood and gore. The film has Cinderella star Lily James playing Elizabeth, who in this version just happens to be leading a small army of sword-toting society women in
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Review: Pride and Prejudice, the Graphic Novel

Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice by Ian Edginton and Robert Deas. Self Made Hero, 144 pages. $19.95 retail hardcopy; also available in electronic editions.

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that I’m a huge Jane Austen fangirl. I make no apologies. I made my husband take me to the Jane Austen museum in Bath for my 40th birthday. I own every version of every Jane Austen movie made – retellings too. As a matter of facet, I collect adaptations in every form from the sublime (The Lizzie Bennet Diaries, Bridget Jones, Clueless) to the abusively bad (Rude Awakenings of a Jane Austen Addict is currently in my car’s CD player right now, but I’m powering through because I am not a quitter.) I’ve read Pride and Prejudice annually since I was 19 – and it’s not even my favorite Austen novel (that would be Persuasion, which I also read
See full article at Comicmix »

Shabana Azmi has joined the cast of the Hollywood film, The Black Prince

Acclaimed actress Shabana Azmi has joined the cast of Hollywood’s The Black Prince, a film telling the tragic yet fascinating true story of Maharaja Duleep Singh the last King of the Sikh Empire in Punjab. Son of the powerful ruler Ranjit Singh, he was born in 1838 and placed on the throne at the age of 5 after the death of his father. In 1849, when Punjab was annexed to British India, the young prince was removed from the throne and eventually sent off to England. His attempts to return to India and reclaim his kingdom were thwarted by the British. He ended up a pauper, dying alone in a Paris hotel in 1893.

Co-produced by Brillstein Entertainment Partners executive Jai Khanna, the drama will be directed by Kavi Raz and features the acting debut of acclaimed singer-poet Satinder Sartaaj.

One of the most highly respected actresses in India, Shabana Azmi has appeared
See full article at Bollyspice »

Emma Roberts Replaces Hailee Steinfeld in For the Dogs

Although Hailee Steinfeld was announced for the role last summer , Deadline reports today that Emma Roberts ( We're the Millers ) is set to take over Steinfeld's part in the Jonathan Mostow ( Breakdown ) directed For the Dogs . Oren Moverman wrote the most recent draft for the project, based on Paul Leyden's adaptation of Kevin Wignall's novel. The novel is described as follows: Inspired in part by "The Nibelungenlied" (the epic German poem which was the basis for Wagner's "Ring Cycle") and partly by Jane Austen's "Persuasion" (both books actually appear in the text), this is the story of Ella and Lucas. Ella is touring Italy with her boyfriend, unaware that her entire family has been murdered, that her father's business dealings are...
See full article at Comingsoon.net »

New Bid To Buy Jane Austen's Ring Back From Kelly Clarkson

New Bid To Buy Jane Austen's Ring Back From Kelly Clarkson
London — A Jane Austen museum said Monday it has received 100,000 pounds ($155,000) from an anonymous benefactor to help it buy the writer's ring back from singer Kelly Clarkson.

Earlier this month, the British government placed a temporary export ban on the gold-and-turquoise ring in the hope that money could be found to keep it in Britain.

The Jane Austen's House museum said it had raised 103,200 pounds of the 152,450-pound asking price since launching a fundraising campaign on Friday, most of it from a single anonymous donation.

"We are two-thirds of the way there in 48 hours, which is tremendous, but we're not there yet," said museum fundraiser Louise West.

The author of "Pride and Prejudice," who died at age 41 in 1817, left the ring to her sister Cassandra. It remained in the family until it was sold at a Sotheby's auction last year.

The museum at Austen's former home in Chawton, southern England,
See full article at Huffington Post »

Hailee Steinfeld Takes For the Dogs

It was announced earlier this year that Sam Worthington is set to headline Phillip Noyce's new action-thriller For the Dogs . Today, Deadline reports that True Grit and Ender's Game star Hailee Steinfeld will be serving as his co-star. Oren Moverman wrote the script for the project, based on Paul Leyden's adaptation of Kevin Wignall's novel. The novel is described as follows: Inspired in part by "The Nibelungenlied" (the epic German poem which was the basis for Wagner's "Ring Cycle") and partly by Jane Austen's "Persuasion" (both books actually appear in the text), this is the story of Ella and Lucas. Ella is touring Italy with her boyfriend, unaware that her entire family has been murdered, that her father's business dealings are...
See full article at Comingsoon.net »

Jane Austen: Strictly ballroom

For Jane Austen's heroines a ball is a rare chance to mingle with the opposite sex. Now a BBC reconstruction of the Netherfield dance reveals the rigid social conventions that governed regency life

In Emma, Jane Austen concedes that it may be just possible to live without dancing. "Instances have been known of young people passing many, many months successively, without being at any ball of any description, and no material injury accrue either to body or mind." But what an empty life! For anyone who still has sap in them, there is nothing like dancing – nothing to rival what Austen calls "the felicities of rapid motion". In Austen's fiction, as in many novels of the 19th century, a ball is the ultimate occasion for a heady kind of courtship – a trying out of partners that is exciting, flirtatious and downright erotic.

In Pride and Prejudice, the complicated mutual
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Sam Worthington to Star in Phillip Noyce's For the Dogs

Variety reports that Sam Worthington will star in director Phillip Noyce's new action-thriller For the Dogs . Oren Moverman wrote the script based on Paul Leyden's adaptation of Kevin Wignall's novel. The novel is described as follows: Inspired in part by "The Nibelungenlied" (the epic German poem which was the basis for Wagner's "Ring Cycle") and partly by Jane Austen's "Persuasion" (both books actually appear in the text), this is the story of Ella and Lucas. Ella is touring Italy with her boyfriend, unaware that her entire family has been murdered, that her father's business dealings are questionable, and that someone is about to attempt to kill her. Lucas is a retired hitman, keeping an eye on Ella as a favour for her father. He saves Ella...
See full article at Comingsoon.net »

Pride and Prejudice at 200: the best Jane Austen small-screen adaptations

Forget Oscar-tipped films and lush BBC dramatisations – the Lizzie Bennet Diaries is an addictive bi-weekly retelling of Pride and Prejudice for the web generation

Jane Austen has been providing us with Sunday-evening viewing fodder ever since someone had the ratings-winning idea of putting gowns and tight breeches on primetime TV. But as Elizabeth Bennet and Fitzwilliam Darcy celebrate their 200th anniversary of appearing in print, the best Austen adaptation around at the moment isn't an Oscar-tipped film or a lush BBC dramatisation – it's a series of 10-minute YouTube videos, with accompanying in-character tweets. And it's modern-day. And American.

The Lizzie Bennet Diaries calls itself an "innovative, original episodic video and social media series produced for the web". Actually, it's an addictive bi-weekly retelling of Pride and Prejudice, in which Darcy is a hipster, Lizzie is a beleaguered grad student and her mother is just as desperate to get her married off as in the original.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

David Nicholls: Adapting Great Expectations for the screen

David Nicholls, author of the hit novel One Day, has always loved Dickens's novel. As the film version is about to be released, he reveals how he set about his adaptation

Read a book at the right age and it will stay with you for life. For some people it's Pride and Prejudice, Jane Eyre or Wuthering Heights, but for me it is Great Expectations. I first read it at 14 or so and, apart from some infatuations with Orwell, Fitzgerald, Salinger and Hardy, it has remained my favourite novel ever since. By some miracle, a story written in the mid-1850s had captured much of how I felt in a small provincial town at the end of the 1970s.

Yet if I saw myself in the book, it wasn't a particularly flattering portrait. It's clear why a young reader might aspire to be Elizabeth Bennet, but who would want to be Pip Pirrip?
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Kelly Clarkson banned from taking Austen's ring out of UK

Kelly Clarkson has been banned from taking a £152,000 ring out of Britain. The singer successfully bid for the ring - which was once owned by revered romantic novelist Jane Austen - at a UK auction, but she is not allowed to take the ring back to the States when her British tour comes to an end tomorrow (20.10.12) because it has been declared a national treasure. Kelly - who also won a first edition of the writer's 1817 novel 'Persuasion' - said: ''I got up at 4am to start bidding on the auction. ''We put in an export request but
See full article at Virgin Media - Celebrity »

Daphne Slater obituary

Actor who made her name during the early years of drama on television

As a captivating young ingenue in Shakespeare on stage, and Jane Austen on television, Daphne Slater, who has died aged 84, enjoyed a brilliant career for 10 years, followed by decent television work for the next 10, before withdrawing into family life almost completely by 1975.

At Stratford-upon-Avon in 1947, she appeared as a radical (for those days) young Olivia in Twelfth Night; both mother and daughter (Thaisa and Marina) in Pericles; Juliet in Peter Brook's beautiful Romeo and Juliet set in Verona ("a miracle of masks, mists and sudden grotesquerie," wrote Kenneth Tynan); and Miranda in The Tempest. Her Juliet, said Tynan, was rightly "excitable and impetuous, and she communicates this convulsive ardour until it becomes our panic as well as hers". Her future husband, John Harrison, played Benvolio, and their offstage romance continued during The Tempest, in which Harrison played Ferdinand,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Hyde Park On Hudson Starring Bill Murray Begins Production

Academy Award nominees Bill Murray and Laura Linney star in the historical tale Hyde Park on Hudson, which began filming this week in the U.K. for co-producers and co-financiers Focus Features and Film4. BAFTA Award winner Roger Michell (Film4.s Venus) is directing from a screenplay by Richard Nelson. Focus CEO James Schamus made the announcement today.

Focus will release Hyde Park on Hudson in the second half of 2012. Focus holds worldwide rights . excluding U.K. free-tv rights, which are held by Film4 . to the movie. Filming is taking place in the U.K. on the Free Range Films/Daybreak Pictures production. Kevin Loader (In the Loop) and David Aukin (Endgame) are producing the feature with Mr. Michell. Focus executive vice president, European production Teresa Moneo is supervising Hyde Park on Hudson.

In June 1939, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (played by Mr. Murray) and his wife Eleanor (Olivia Williams of
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Laura Linney Goes To "Hyde Park"

Laura Linney is in advanced talks to play Margaret 'Daisy' Suckley in the drama “Hyde Park On Hudson” for Focus Features International says The Daily Mail.

Based on a British radio play by Richard Nelson and set in the Summer of 1939 just before World War II broke out, the story follows the visit of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth to President Roosevelt's upstate New York home near Hyde Park on Hudson.

Over the course of the weekend, details of Fdr's private life begin to unfold including his affair with his distant cousin Daisy.

British actors Samuel West ("Notting Hill,” “Persuasion") and Olivia Colman ("Tyrannosaur," "Hot Fuzz") are set to play King George and Queen Elizabeth.

Roger Michell (''Notting Hill'') is on board to direct the story while Nelson adapted the script. Kevin Loader and David Aukin will produce.
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Cumberbatch and Miller Do Danny Boyle's Frankenstein

  • Pajiba
For those of us lamenting the lack of new "Sherlock" episodes and the opportunity to see more of Benedict Cumberbatch, this news makes the day a little bit brighter. London's National Theater Live is giving us the opportunity to see performances of Danny Boyle's production of Frankenstein at theaters across the country (by some miracle, even close to me), even if we're nowhere near the UK. Nick Dear's ("Agatha Christie's Poirot, Persuasion) play, based on Mary Shelley's classic tale of a creature cast out into a cruel world by his creator, stars Jonny Lee Miller ("Dexter, Eli Stone," Trainspotting, The Escapist) and Cumberbatch (The Whistleblower, Four Lions). And in one of the coolest twist-ups ever, two performances will be recorded, each one featuring the lead roles reversed. That's right, one performance will feature Miller as the creature and Cumberbatch as the creator and the next, Cumberbatch as creature and Miller as creator.
See full article at Pajiba »

Where There's a Will

Tom Sturridge may fit right in the midst of his generation of dark-haired, handsome British actors, but he refuses to consider his colleagues as competition. "If a film is being made by an intelligent director, they're going to cast the right guy," says Sturridge. "I shouldn't be right for every role, because I'm not." Indeed, the actor says he thoroughly enjoyed himself during a two-year gap between roles. And he won't plot and struggle for his next role. "You can construct something and make decisions and do film after film to try and get to this place, and never get there," he says. "And you can do nothing, and then get a phone call randomly saying X has just seen you do an interview on the Internet and thinks you'd be perfect for this film, and suddenly you're in Brazil shooting the best film ever made. All of it is circumstance.
See full article at Backstage »

Girls on Film: Why Is Jane Austen So Popular Today?

  • Moviefone
Filed under: Columns, Cinematical

When we think of English writers, we think of the irreplaceable William Shakespeare -- the man so prolific, in so many genres, that we've been served well over 800 films and series that dig into his tomes. But there's another English writer whose also had a massive impact with far fewer -- and far less diverse -- works. She is Jane Austen.

You can't throw a stone into female-centric fare without hitting Austen in some way, shape or form. In the last decade alone, there have been four 'Pride and Prejudice' productions, two treatments of Emma, dalliances into 'Mansfield Park,' 'Northanger Abbey' and 'Persuasion,' not to mention four looks into 'Sense and Sensibility,' including this week's Latina-spinned twist, 'From Prada to Nada.' That's all of her novels getting at least one adaptation, if not multiple stabs,
See full article at Moviefone »

Girls on Film: Why Is Jane Austen So Popular Today?

Girls on Film: Why Is Jane Austen So Popular Today?
Filed under: Columns, Cinematical

When we think of English writers, we think of the irreplaceable William Shakespeare -- the man so prolific, in so many genres, that we've been served well over 800 films and series that dig into his tomes. But there's another English writer whose also had a massive impact with far fewer -- and far less diverse -- works. She is Jane Austen.

You can't throw a stone into female-centric fare without hitting Austen in some way, shape or form. In the last decade alone, there have been four 'Pride and Prejudice' productions, two treatments of Emma, dalliances into 'Mansfield Park,' 'Northanger Abbey' and 'Persuasion,' not to mention four looks into 'Sense and Sensibility,' including this week's Latina-spinned twist, 'From Prada to Nada.' That's all of her novels getting at least one adaptation, if not multiple stabs,
See full article at Cinematical »

Roger Michell: The Hollywood Flashback Interview

(Roger Michell, above.)

(I interviewed director Roger Michell in 2004, for the release of his film The Mother. This past month, he released his newest, Morning Glory. This article originally appeared in Venice Magazine.)

A Return to Notting Hill with Roger Michell

By Terry Keefe

To see just how diverse a director Roger Michell is, all you need to do is compare the two very different versions of London's Notting Hill district that he has shown us on film. The first was the sizable studio picture, Notting Hill, which starred Julia Roberts and Hugh Grant and which was one of the biggest hits of 1999. A romantic comedy about an ordinary bookstore owner who finds himself in a relationship with a huge movie star, Notting Hill managed to be breezy on its surface level but also deceptively deep in its characterizations. And it also made you want to visit the charming and
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

Bond Back In Business, Beale Joining?

With MGM having been approved to begin Chapter 11 reorganization later this month, plans for getting back to work on the James Bond franchise are beginning to firm up over at Eon it would seem.

On Wednesday composer David Arnold, who has scored the last five Bond films, tells FilmMusicMag (via MI6) that he "only just got the news that we’re back on" and he's currently awaiting a script before he can begin work.

Then last night came an interview with Kate Winslet in The Daily Mail where the actress indicated her husband Sam Mendes is still attached to direct.

“Sam is doing the next Bond film, all being well, and we’ll all be in England if that happens. It’s such a massive commitment for him and it’s not fair for him to commute backwards and forwards to New York from London” says Winslet. The article also
See full article at Dark Horizons »
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