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Cuarón, Del Toro, and More Condemn Italian Fascists After Violent ‘First Reformed’ Screening

Cuarón, Del Toro, and More Condemn Italian Fascists After Violent ‘First Reformed’ Screening
Like many outdoor screening series, the Rome-based Cinema America gathers hundreds of people during the summer to watch movies from around the world. This month, however, the group’s gathering turned into a battlefield. Following a June 16 screening of Paul Schrader’s “First Reformed,” four young men were hospitalized after brutal attacks by far-right fascists who singled out a victim for wearing a “Cinema America” t-shirt.

Four men were arrested following the 4 a.m. attack, which reflected the mounting showdowns between Italy’s growing far-right faction and anyone perceived as harboring leftist sentiments. It has also cast a light on the resilience of Cinema America, a seven-year-old collective that has fought back against local hate groups.

Schrader compared the ongoing showdown to May 1968, when the riots across France resulted in directors protesting across the country and the cancellation of the Cannes Film Festival. “All of a sudden, we’re having
See full article at Indiewire »

Remembering Stan Lee, William Goldman, Nicolas Roeg and More Reel-Important People We Lost in November

  • Movies.com
Reel-Important People is a monthly column that highlights those individuals in or related to the movies that have left us in recent weeks. Below you'll find names big and small and from all areas of the industry, though each was significant to the movies in his or her own way. Bernardo Bertolucci (1941-2018) - Filmmaker. He won two Oscars for writing and directing The Last Emperor, which also won Best Picture. He was also nominated for helming The Conformist and Last Tango in Paris. His other movies include The Dreamers, Stealing Beauty, 1900, Little Buddha, The Sheltering Sky and Before the Revolution. Early in his career, he served as assistant director for Pasolini's Accattone! He died on November 26. [THR] Dominique Blanchar (1927-2018) - Actress. She co-starred in...
See full article at Movies.com »

Turin Film Fest to Pay Tribute to Bernardo Bertolucci With Day of Screenings

Turin Film Fest to Pay Tribute to Bernardo Bertolucci With Day of Screenings
The Turin Film Festival on Saturday announced it will hold a day of tribute to Bernardo Bertolucci, the Oscar-winning Italian director who died Nov. 26.

The 36th edition of the event will conclude Sunday with a day of screenings dedicated to the master in Turin's Cinema Massimo.

The fest will screen three of Bertolucci’s works, including 1900, the 1976 historical drama starring Robert De Niro, Gérard Depardieu, Burt Lancaster and Donald Sutherland); 1970's The Conformist, starring Jean-Louis Trintignant, Stefania Sandrelli, Dominique Sanda and Gastone Moschin; and 1996's Stealing Beauty, starring Liv Tyler, Jeremy Irons, Sinead Cusack and Rachel ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Bernardo Bertolucci, Oscar-winning Director, Dead At Age 77

  • CinemaRetro
Bertolucci on location for "Last Tango in Paris" with Marlon Brando and Maria Schneider in 1972.

By Lee Pfeiffer

Bernardo Bertolucci, the acclaimed Italian director, has died in Rome at age 77. The cause of death was not immediately revealed. Bertolucci won an Oscar for his direction of the 1987 film "The Last Emperor" and also received acclaim for his earlier films that included "The Spider's Stratagem" and "The Conformist". A left-wing Marxist through much of his life, Bertolucci also directed the 1976 epic "1900" which was steeped in political overtones. His most famous and notorious film was "Last Tango in Paris" (1972), which was non-political but highly controversial. It's graphic sexual content was the cause of international controversy and resulted in Bertolucci being charged with obscenity in his native Italy. The film starred Marlon Brando in the tale of a depressed, middle-aged American ex-pat who indulges in a series of anonymous sexual encounters with a teenage Parisian girl (Maria Schneider.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Bernardo Bertolucci, Last Tango in Paris Director, Dies at 77

Bernardo Bertolucci, Last Tango in Paris Director, Dies at 77
Italian film director Bernardo Bertolucci, whose career defined scandal and evoked eroticism and sumptuous beauty, has died of cancer in Rome. The director of Last Tango In Paris was 77 and had been confined to a wheelchair for much of the last 10 years.

A product of Italian New Wave cinema’s golden era, the Parma-born Bertolucci achieved international acclaim, winning the Oscar for Best Director for 1987’s The Last Emperor.

Beginning as a poet, Bertolucci entered film work as a writer for Pier Paolo Pasolini before attracting attention as a director-writer with 1970’s The Conformist, a stylish work that brought him
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Bernardo Bertolucci, Oscar Winner and ‘Last Tango in Paris’ Director, Dead at 77

Bernardo Bertolucci, Oscar Winner and ‘Last Tango in Paris’ Director, Dead at 77
Bernardo Bertolucci, the legendary Italian director behind classics such as “Last Tango in Paris” and “The Last Emperor,” has died at age 77. Bertolucci’s publicist, Flavia Shiavi, confirmed the director’s passing on the morning of Monday, November 26. The filmmaker, who had been suffering from cancer, died at his home in Rome, Italy.

Bertolucci was widely considered one of Italy’s greatest auteurs throughout his five decades making films in both Hollywood and Italy. The filmmaker got his start working with another giant of Italian cinema, Pier Paolo Pasolini. Bertolucci was an assistant on Pasolini’s first feature, “Accattone,” before he made his own directorial debut at age 21 with “The Grim Reaper” in 1962. The drama centered around the murder of a Roman prostitute and premiered at the Venice Film Festival. Bertolucci gained recognition in Hollywood following the release of “The Conformist,” which earned him an Oscar nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay.
See full article at Indiewire »

Italian Director Bernardo Bertolucci Dead at 77

Don Kaye Nov 26, 2018

The controversial and visionary director of Last Tango in Paris and The Last Emperor is gone.

Italian director Bernardo Bertolucci, a giant of European cinema, has passed away at the age of 77. Bertolucci died in Paris on Monday morning (Nov. 26) after a battle with cancer. He had been confined to a wheelchair for the last decade following unsuccessful surgery for a herniated disc.

Bertolucci was best known for his 1987 film The Last Emperor, which won Academy Awards for Best Picture, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Director. Yet his works also included such controversial and groundbreaking films as The Conformist (1970) and Last Tango in Paris (1972). The former was a masterful political drama while the latter was a raw examination of sexual and emotional torment. 

Born in Parma in 1941, Bertolucci was the son of a poet and teacher and grew up around the arts. When he was 20 years old,
See full article at Den of Geek »

'The Last Emperor' director Bernardo Bertolucci dies aged 77

'The Last Emperor' director Bernardo Bertolucci dies aged 77
His films also included Last Tango In Paris and The Conformist.

Bernardo Bertolucci, director of The Last Emperor and Last Tango In Paris, has died aged 77.

According to his publicist, Bertolucci died of cancer Monday morning (26 November).

The Last Emperor, his biopic of China’s final ruler Pu Yi backed by UK producer Jeremy Thomas, won nine Oscars in 1987, winning in every category it was nominated in including best picture and best director.

1976 erotic drama Last Tango In Paris, starring Marlon Brando and Maria Schneider won Bertolucci international renown earlier in his, but proved controversial thanks to its infamous rape scene.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Bernardo Bertolucci Dies: Italian Director Of ‘The Last Emperor’ & ‘Last Tango In Paris’ Was 77

  • Deadline
Bernardo Bertolucci Dies: Italian Director Of ‘The Last Emperor’ & ‘Last Tango In Paris’ Was 77
Bernardo Bertolucci, a towering figure of world cinema, has died aged 77.

The influential Italian auteur, perhaps best known for epic The Last Emperor, which won nine Oscars, and groundbreaking works such as Last Tango In Paris and The Conformist, has passed away in Rome following a battle with cancer his publicist has confirmed.

Bertolucci was a key figure in the extraordinary Italian cinema of the 1960s and early 1970s but also made a successful transition to big canvas Hollywood filmmaking with 1987’s The Last Emperor, whose Oscars included Best Picture and Best Director for Bertolucci.

Bertolucci was born in the Italian city of Parma in 1941, the son of a poet and teacher. His father was friends with future avant-garde filmmaker Pier Paolo Pasolini, then a novelist and poet, and Pasolino hired the 20-year-old Bertolucci as his assistant on his 1961 debut, Accattone. Bertolucci made his own directorial debut on 1962 feature La
See full article at Deadline »

Liv Tyler In "Porter"

  • SneakPeek
Sneak Peek new images of actress iv Tyler in the winter 2017 issue of "Porter" Magazine, photographed by Cedric Buchet:

Tyler began a career in modeling at a young age, debuting as an actress in the feature "Silent Fall" (1994), followed by supporting roles in "Empire Records" (1995), "Heavy" (1996) and "That Thing You Do!" (1996).

Tyler then appeared in director Bernardo Bertolucci's "Stealing Beauty" (1996), followed by supporting roles in the "Abbotts" (1997) and Robert Altman's "Cookie's Fortune" (1999).

Tyler then achieved international recognition as the 'Elf' maiden 'Arwen Undómiel' in the "Lord of the Rings" film trilogy (2001–2003), followed by the 2004 comedy "Jersey Girl", the indie feature "Lonesome Jim" (2005), the drama "Reign Over Me" (2007) and studio features "Armageddon" (1998), "The Strangers (2008) and "The Incredible Hulk" (2008). In 2014, she made her TV debut as a regular on the HBO series "The Leftovers".

Click the images to enlarge and Sneak Peek Liv Tyler...
See full article at SneakPeek »

The Current Debate: The Excessive Perfection of "Call Me By Your Name"

  • MUBI
Luca Guadagnino’s Call Me By Your Name appears to be well on its way to box office and awards success, having earned both this year’s best opening weekend among limited releases and a Best Picture award from the Los Angeles Film Critics Association. The film is about an affair between Elio (Timothée Chalamet), a precocious teenager, and Oliver (Armie Hammer), the graduate student who comes to Italy to assist Elio’s father in the summer of 1983. Like 2015’s A Bigger Splash, Guadagnino’s latest features lots of pretty images of beautiful people doing luxurious things, but, as Manohla Dargis contends at The New York Times, it has more than that to offer:Even so, the lyricism seduces as does fragile, ecstatic Elio. “Call Me by Your Name” is less a coming-of-age story, a tale of innocence and loss, than one about coming into sensibility. In that way, it is
See full article at MUBI »

Sundance 2017 Breakouts: Here Are The Movies You Can Expect To See In Next Year’s Oscar Race

Sundance 2017 Breakouts: Here Are The Movies You Can Expect To See In Next Year’s Oscar Race
On January 24, halfway through the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, Sundance received its annual reconfirmation of its long-legged success: The Oscar nominations. This year it’s Kenneth Lonergan’s “Manchester by the Sea,” and documentaries “Life, Animated” and “Oj: Made in America.” (Another five docs were shortlisted.)

Among its many other achievements, Sundance breaks out new talent. Agents, casting directors, producers, and filmmakers trawl screening rooms, looking for their next find. They network and party and pass buzz as they go, even when they must plow through blizzards to do it.

Here’s a look at what we might be celebrating this time next year. But remember, it’s a long long way from January to January.

Call Me By Your Name

The most obvious Oscar movie stood out from a sea of aspiring American indies, which is likely what Sony Pictures Classics had in mind when they scooped up the film
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Sundance 2017 Breakouts: Here Are The Movies You Can Expect To See In Next Year’s Oscar Race

Sundance 2017 Breakouts: Here Are The Movies You Can Expect To See In Next Year’s Oscar Race
On January 24, halfway through the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, Sundance received its annual reconfirmation of its long-legged success: The Oscar nominations. This year it’s Kenneth Lonergan’s “Manchester by the Sea,” and documentaries “Life, Animated” and “Oj: Made in America.” (Another five docs were shortlisted.)

Among its many other achievements, Sundance breaks out new talent. Agents, casting directors, producers, and filmmakers trawl screening rooms, looking for their next find. They network and party and pass buzz as they go, even when they must plow through blizzards to do it.

Here’s a look at what we might be celebrating this time next year. But remember, it’s a long long way from January to January.

Call Me By Your Name

The most obvious Oscar movie stood out from a sea of aspiring American indies, which is likely what Sony Pictures Classics had in mind when they scooped up the film
See full article at Indiewire »

[Cannes Review] Paterson

In his Village Voice review of Jim Jarmusch’s criminally under-appreciated The Limits of Control, J. Hoberman described the director as “a full-blown talent [who] erupts once a decade: Stranger than Paradise in the ’80s, Dead Man in the ’90s and The Limits of Control [in the ’00s].” Jarmusch has now validated Hoberman’s estimation with a fresh new masterpiece for our present decade: Paterson.

If there is one element working against the sheer wonder of Jarmusch’s film, it’s our own expectations. The narrative is an exercise in repetition, split up into seven days, the first five near-identical. Each one starts with a captioned – Monday, Tuesday… – top-down shot of Paterson (Adam Driver) and his girlfriend Laura (Golshifteh Farahani) asleep in bed together, followed by a relatively strict routine of events: Paterson gets up a little after 6 a.m. and goes to work as a bus driver, drives around until knock-off time, then
See full article at The Film Stage »

Warner Bros takes UK on 'Wildling'

  • ScreenDaily
Exclusive: The studio has acquired UK rights from Im Global at the Efm to Maven Pictures’ upcoming genre film.

Rising UK talent Bel Powley stars opposite Liv Tyler in Wildling, which is currently in post.

Im Global showed footage in Berlin where buyers have responded strongly. The UK deal demonstrates the appeal of the cast, not to mention a storyline that bears similarities to that of Room starring Academy Award frontrunner Brie Larson.

The film centres on a girl who spends her whole childhood in a room under the care of a mysterious figure known only as Daddy.

The custodian raises the girl to fear the outside world with stories of a beast that prowls beyond the four walls. When she is freed at the age of 16, the youngster’s biggest challenge begins. Germany’s Fritz Böhm makes his feature directorial debut.

Maven Pictures led by Celine Rattray, Trudie Styler and Charlotte Ubben is financing and producing
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Im Global to launch 'Wildling' at Efm

  • ScreenDaily
Exclusive: Stuart Ford and his team will introduce Berlin buyers to the genre film starring British rising star Bel Powley and Liv Tyler in a timely move that echoes Oscar nominee Room.

Celine Rattray, Trudie Styler and Charlotte Ubben’s Maven Pictures finances and produces Wilding, which tells of a girl who spends her entire childhood in a single room under the care of an enigmatic person known as Daddy.

The man raises his young charge to fear the world beyond her four walls with stories of a ferocious beast that roams outside. When she is freed at the age of 16 by a small-town sheriff the girl faces the biggest challenge of her life.

Germany’s Fritz Böhm marks his feature directorial debut on Wildling, which is in post. Im Global will show footage and handles sales through its Octane genre division. UTA Independent Film Group represents Us rights.

Powley (pictured) plays the youngster and shot to
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Liv Tyler at 38: 'At my age in Hollywood, you're a second-class citizen'

Liv Tyler at 38: 'At my age in Hollywood, you're a second-class citizen'
Liv Tyler has spoken candidly about film-industry sexism, describing herself at 38 as being treated as a "second-class citizen" in Hollywood.

The actress lamented the lack of "exciting" parts available to those in her age bracket, telling More magazine that "38 is a crazy number".

"It's not fun when you see things start to change," she continued. "When you're in your teens or 20s, there is an abundance of ingenue parts which are exciting to play.

"But at [my age], you're usually the wife or the girlfriend - a sort of second-class citizen. There are more interesting roles for women when they get a bit older."

The star - who reprises her role as Meg Abbott in the upcoming second series of HBO's The Leftovers - joins a list of high-profile Hollywood actresses including Helen Mirren, Carey Mulligan, Maggie Gyllenhaal and Anne Hathaway in criticising the film industry over ageism and sexism.

Speaking to Glamour UK earlier this year,
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Oscar-Nominated 'The Immigrant' Cinematographer Darius Khondji on Working with James Gray and Woody Allen

Oscar-Nominated 'The Immigrant' Cinematographer Darius Khondji on Working with James Gray and Woody Allen
The Iranian-French cinematographer Darius Khondji has worked with an impressive roster of international A-list directors including Bernardo Bertolucci ("Stealing Beauty"), David Fincher ("Seven"), Jean-Pierre Jeunet ("The City of Lost Children"), Danny Boyle ("The Beach"), Roman Polanski ("The Ninth Gate"), Woody Allen ("Midnight in Paris"), Wong Kar-wai ("My Blueberry Nights") and Michael Haneke ("Amour"). With his latest project, James Gray's "The Immigrant," hitting theaters last Friday, Indiewire spoke to Khondji by phone about working with Gray for the first time and about how it's different from his collaboration with other directors. Starring Marion Cotillard as a Polish immigrant arriving at Ellis Island in 1921, and Joaquin Phoenix and Jeremy Renner as the complicated men she encounters, "The Immigrant" exposes the darker side of the "American dream." The look of the film is simultaneously dingy and spectacular, a fitting depiction of both the wonder...
See full article at Indiewire »

My Favourite Movie: Cold Comes the Night's Alice Eve and Stealing Beauty

My Favourite Movie: Cold Comes the Night's Alice Eve and Stealing Beauty
Alice Eve might be best known for her roles in Star Trek Into Darkness and Starter for 10, but speaking to the Brit actress for the home release of drama Cold Comes the Night one thing stands out: she really knows her movies.

The latest star to volunteer a choice for our ongoing My Favourite Movie series, Eve picked a film from Last Tango in Paris director Bernardo Bertolucci.

"I love everything about Stealing Beauty," she told Digital Spy. "There's a dysfunctional family, a cross-generational relationship, the loss of innocence, and the stamp the loss of innocence puts on you for the rest of your life."

Bertolucci's 1996 film starred Liv Tyler as an American girl who heads to the Tuscan countryside after the death of her mother. Seeking to uncover the identity of her father and lose her virginity to a boy she met four years earlier, Stealing Beauty has
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Jeremy Irons joins Dev Patel in the biopic of Srinivasa Ramanuja: The Man Who Knew Infinity

Respected actor Jeremy Irons is set to co-star in the Edward R. Pressman/ Prashita Chaudhary’s Cinemorphic Entertainment Company production of The Man Who Knew Infinity, the biographic film on the life of Srinivasa Ramanujan with Dev Patel starring as the revered Indian mathematician. Irons will play G.H. Hardy, the English mathematician who plucked Ramanujan from obscurity in Edwardian India and installed him in the hallowed halls of Cambridge University.

The film will be directed by Matthew Brown, who also wrote the screenplay based on the biography The Man Who Knew Infinity: A Life of the Genius Ramanujan by Robert Kanigel. Edward R. Pressman and Prashita Chaudhary of Cinemorphic are producers along with Jim Young under his Animus Films banner and Sofia Sondervan of Dutch Tilt Film.

Announcing the casting, Pressman said, “I am delighted to be working with Jeremy again. Our last collaboration on Reversal of Fortune earned an Oscar for Jeremy,
See full article at Bollyspice »
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