7.0/10
326
10 user 2 critic

The Day Lincoln Was Shot (1998)

Not Rated | | Biography, Drama, History | TV Movie 12 April 1998
April 14, 1865. As four year of Civil War draw to a close, our country again faces unforgettable tragedy: the assassination of the President. Starring Lance Henriksen as the Great ... See full summary »

Director:

John Gray

Writers:

Jim Bishop (book), Tim Metcalfe (teleplay) | 1 more credit »
Reviews

Watch Now

From $2.99 on Prime Video

Nominated for 3 Primetime Emmys. Another 2 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Rob Morrow ... John Wilkes Booth
Lance Henriksen ... President Abraham Lincoln
Donna Murphy ... Mary Todd Lincoln
Jean Louisa Kelly ... Lucy Hale
Wil Wheaton ... Robert Todd Lincoln
Titus Welliver ... Lewis Thornton Paine
Jaimz Woolvett ... David E. Herold
Jeremy Sisto ... Frederick Seward
Kirk B.R. Woller ... George A. Atzerodt (as Kirk B. R. Woller)
John Pleshette ... Secretary of State William Henry Seward
Gregory Itzin ... Mr. Crook
Adam Lamberg ... Thomas 'Tad' Lincoln
John Ashton ... Gen. Ulysses Simpson Grant
Eddie Jones ... Secretary of War Edwin McMasters Stanton
Nancy Robinette Nancy Robinette ... Mary E. Surratt
Edit

Storyline

April 14, 1865. As four year of Civil War draw to a close, our country again faces unforgettable tragedy: the assassination of the President. Starring Lance Henriksen as the Great Emancipator and Rob Morrow as assassin John Wilkes Booth, this riveting recreation of The Day Lincoln Was Shot (from Jim Bishop's landmark book) is a thrilling and detailed chronicle of the plot, murder and manhunt that changed America forever. To avenge what he called the Confederacy's "noble cause," Booth conspires with his motley followers, rages and boasts, and aspires to a place in history as a Great Man. The weary Lincoln, longing for a just peace, meets with his Cabinet, steals precious time with his family and dreams - literally - of the death of a President. Minute by minute, killer and victim edge closer to the burst of gunfire at Ford's Theatre that stopped Lincoln's heart - and shattered the country's soul. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The Murder. The Manhunt. The Events That Stunned A Nation.


Certificate:

Not Rated

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

12 April 1998 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Atentat na Linkolna See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Goofs

When Lewis Paine is stabbing Secretary Seward in his bed, at the right of the screen you can see a camera operator. See more »

Quotes

John Wilkes Booth: What we are talking about is property, slaves are property, valuable, well taken care of. Uhh, gentlemen treats his slaves the way he would his finest tools, with care and concern. It's in his own best interest to do so. Now this... dictator, declares they are free. What happens now? What *happens* to these free men? Free to what? Free to go where? What what what are they trained for? It's insanity. I mean does this man truly believe that he can obliterate a way of life that is centuries old?
John Surratt: ...
[...]
See more »

Connections

Remake of Ford Star Jubilee: The Day Lincoln Was Shot (1956) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Fine Cable Fodder
12 December 1998 | by Quinn-5See all my reviews

Director John Gray, after his last two mediocre-at-best theatrical efforts "Born To Be Wild" and "The Glimmer Man", returns to his tv-directing roots with "The Day Lincoln Was Shot", a fascinating look at one of our country's most famous assassinations. When you watch a good movie, you usually go through the motions: suspense, awe, tragedy (or at least mild sadness), and hopefully in the process crack a smile or two. While no brilliant cinematic triumph, "The Day Lincoln Was Shot" more or less manages to achieve those basic standards, and nowadays, that's no easy feat. What helps it achieve that, though, are two vital factors that elude most modern Hollywood projects: great subject material and great casting. The material is obvious, and should be interesting to most anyone who has even the vaguest knowledge of American history. As for casting, "Millennium" star Lance Henriksen finally lands a fresh role as the Sixteenth President, and it's a startling discovery to find that Mr. Henriksen has been seemingly born with the precise facial mold of good ol' Honest Abe himself, and that it's taken so long for someone to notice! Just add beard, costume and viola! While still playing a dark role, there's a spark to Mr. Henriksen's Lincoln, that makes him alive and real, and more importantly, human. Rob Morrow is John Wilkes Booth, the actor gone bad, who, as we see here, is not just a cardboard borderline psychotic, rather, there's a method to his madness, a motive that fringes on being understandable that brings a freshness to the scenes Morrow steals; it's a relief to see him playing someone other than a smug yuppie trapped in our society. All in all, John Gray has been blessed with the gift of story-telling brevity, and we get a satisfying tv-viewing experience in one evening, not two or three or four, as is the growing tradition for TNT films...done sparingly, this is a treat for the audience.


8 of 8 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 10 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Trending Movies With Prime Video

Enjoy a night in with these popular movies available to stream now with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed