While She Powdered Her Nose (1912)

In facial decoration Ellen is an artist and never appears in company without adding to her beauty every touch to arouse the admiration of the most indifferent of the sterner sex. John ... See full summary »

Director:

Laurence Trimble

Writer:

Marie Jakobs (as Marie T. Jacobs)
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Cast

Cast overview:
Lillian Walker ... Ellen Page - the Composer's Daughter
Florence Turner ... Betty Thompson
Tom Powers ... Abner Waite
Courtenay Foote ... John Thorpe
Edith Storey ... The Maid
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Storyline

In facial decoration Ellen is an artist and never appears in company without adding to her beauty every touch to arouse the admiration of the most indifferent of the sterner sex. John Thorpe, a wealthy young man, calls one afternoon to see her. She is not prepared to receive it when he sends his card up and she tells him she will see him in a moment. Hoping to make herself most charming, she takes so much time in dressing and "kalsomining" herself, Thorpe becomes impatient and sits down at the piano, playing several selections which he finds on the music rack. While thus engaged, a young lady friend of Ellen's the orphaned daughter of a composer, calls to see her and she overhears Thorpe playing one of her father's compositions. Involuntarily, she becomes absorbed and enters the parlor. Thorpe is surprised to see her and she is not less confused, when she finds herself in his presence. She explains her unintentional interruption by telling him about her father's composition which he ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Comedy | Romance | Short

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

23 December 1912 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

The offering seems to lack distinction
20 April 2017 | by deickemeyerSee all my reviews

The central idea behind this picture is fresh and sufficiently dramatic; but, as a whole, the offering seems to lack distinction, notwithstanding the fact that Florence Turner has the important role in it. Her part doesn't give her much chance: it consists chiefly in showing the effect on a sensitive mind of a piece of music, written by her father, now dead, and overheard unexpectedly. She carries it by a tour de force, but it could hardly be made concise or very definite. Lillian Walker plays the role of a selfish but pretty girl. She has. not very cordially, invited Florence, who needs her help in selling her father's music compositions, to call. Meanwhile, the rich man, Courtney Foote, whom she wants to marry, has sent up his card and, while she is primping, he sits down at the piano. Florence comes, is given a seat in the next room and overhears. The quickness with which the two fall in love and get married is, though possible, not convincing. Tom Powers plays the girl's second fiddle. Marie T. Jacobs is the author and Larry Trimble produced the picture. - The Moving Picture World, January 4, 1913


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