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Life, Love & Celluloid (2005)

Filmmaker Juliane Lorenz's fascinating exploration of Fassbinder's life and work, in which she interviews people who knew, worked with, and had been closely involved with him, as well as ... See full summary »

Director:

Juliane Lorenz

Writer:

Juliane Lorenz
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Cast

Credited cast:
Armin Armani Armin Armani ... Himself
Christa Armstrong Christa Armstrong ... Herself
Mary Lea Bandy Mary Lea Bandy ... Herself, The Museum of Modern Art, New York
Barbara Baum Barbara Baum ... Herself
Max Brandt Max Brandt ... Himself
Terry Elsworth Terry Elsworth ... Himself
Rainer Werner Fassbinder ... Himself (voice) (archive footage)
Geoffrey Gilmore ... Himself
Gottfried John ... Himself
Laurence Kardish Laurence Kardish ... Himself
Elizabeth Kemp ... Herself
Günter Lamprecht Günter Lamprecht ... Himself
Graham Leggat Graham Leggat ... Himself
Maria Pelikan Maria Pelikan ... Herself
Rolf Pelikan Rolf Pelikan ... Himself
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Storyline

Filmmaker Juliane Lorenz's fascinating exploration of Fassbinder's life and work, in which she interviews people who knew, worked with, and had been closely involved with him, as well as cinema scholars, in New York, Los Angeles, and Germany. Written by Ulf Kjell Gür

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Plot Keywords:

f rated | independent film | See All (2) »

Genres:

Documentary

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Details

Country:

Germany

Language:

English | German

Release Date:

30 July 2005 (Poland) See more »

Filming Locations:

New York City, New York, USA

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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User Reviews

 
Missed Opportunity
25 August 2006 | by shanejamesbordasSee all my reviews

Unfocused and rambling, this is a missed opportunity from long time Rainer Werner Fassbinder editor Juliane Lorenz. Although advertised to be about the filmmaker, Fassbinder is actually only discussed in a fraction of the narrative, which goes off on other tangents to varying degrees of success. Disappointingly, no clips from his films are shown as Lorenz opts instead for excerpts from American productions of his plays (which don't fully translate for the camera) and footage of Hanna Schygulla performing a Fassbinder inspired one-woman show. Elsewhere, long tracking shots of New York City, LA and desert scenes are shown set to moody music with little sense of purpose. Random bits of narrative - some of Lorenz reading, some of Fassbinder himself - are overlaid without any indication as to their source. Too much focus is also given over to a 1997 MOMA retrospective of Fassbinder's work which incorporates comments from various punters and former collaborators which range from the moderately insightful to the rather banal.

There are some moments of interest if looked at more as an overview of the power and importance of film art in people's lives (in contrast to the Hollywood perception of it) but anyone seeking a fuller appreciation of Fassbinder is strongly recommended to instead seek out 'I Don't Just Want You To Love Me', Hans Günther Pflaum's superlative overview of the man and his career.


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