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Kent Jones to Step Down as Director of New York Film Festival

  • The Wrap
Kent Jones to Step Down as Director of New York Film Festival
Kent Jones, the director and selection committee chair of the New York Film Festival, will step down from his position following the upcoming 57th edition of the festival, Film at Lincoln Center announced Thursday.

Jones has been the director of the festival for seven years, and he’ll depart after the festival concludes, which takes place between Sept. 27 and Oct. 13. Film at Lincoln Center’s executive director Lesli Klainberg will oversee the transition of leadership, but no replacement has yet been announced. Jones will also continue to work with the team in an advisory role.

“At some point when I was pretty young and already deep into movies, the New York Film Festival became a beacon for me,” Jones said in a statement. “Throughout its history, it has been a true home for the art of cinema–that was how it began with Richard Roud and Amos Vogel, that was
See full article at The Wrap »

New York Film Festival Director Kent Jones To Step Down

  • Deadline
New York Film Festival Director Kent Jones To Step Down
Kent Jones, now in his seventh year as director of the New York Film Festival, will step down from that position following this year’s 57th edition, the Film at Lincoln Center organization announced today.

Jones, whose career as a film director surged last year with the release of his first narrative feature Diane starring Mary Kay Place (Rotten Tomato score: 93), will continue to work with Flc in an advisory role. Film at Lincoln Center’s Executive Director Lesli Klainberg will oversee the transition of leadership for Nyff.

Jones has been associated with Film at Lincoln Center for more than two decades, including as a year-round programmer, a member of the festival’s selection committee, and contributor to Film Comment.

As director, Jones was credited with expanding the festival with sidebars and new sections including the Spotlight on Documentary and Convergence sections. His tenure saw the first selection of a
See full article at Deadline »

New York Film Festival director Kent Jones to step down after 2019 edition

New York Film Festival director Kent Jones to step down after 2019 edition
Programmer and filmmaker directed Tribeca 2018 selection Diane.

Kent Jones, the director of New York Film Festival and chair of the festival’s selection committee, will step down to focus on his filmmaking career after the 57th edition, which kicks off with the world premiere of The Irishman later this month.

Jones has been associated with Film at Lincoln Center for more than two decades as a year-round programmer, Nyff selection committee member, and Film Comment contributor.

Film at Lincoln Center executive director Lesli Klainberg will oversee the transition of leadership at the festival. Jones will continue to work with Film
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Kent Jones to Exit New York Film Festival (Exclusive)

  • Variety
Kent Jones to Exit New York Film Festival (Exclusive)
In a surprise move, New York Film Festival’s director and selection committee chair of seven years Kent Jones will step down following this year’s 57th edition, which runs Sept. 27-Oct. 13.

The departure comes as Jones’ feature filmmaking career is taking off. Issues of potential conflicts of interest have arisen as his work has moved from mostly cineaste-oriented documentaries such as the 2015 doc “Hitchcock/Truffaut” to narrative features including his 2019 drama “Diane.” That film’s exec producer and Jones’ friend of nearly three decades, Martin Scorsese, is the director of Nyff’s opening-night film, “The Irishman.”

Jones tells Variety that this move has been in the discussion phase with the Film at Lincoln Center board for many months. “It developed kind of organically from the whole experience and reception of ‘Diane,’” which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival in April 2018 and was released by IFC films in March 2019. He will
See full article at Variety »

Working in concert by Anne-Katrin Titze

Ira Spiegel on Brian DePalma's Carlito's Way: "A wonderful effects film with a grand shootout in Grand Central Terminal. Sound editors love violence and noise." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

When I met with Aviva Kempner, the director of The Spy Behind Home Plate, at Soundtracks F/T, where she and Martin Scorsese mainstay re-recording mixer Tom Fleischman were putting in the final touches on her documentary, I had the chance to borrow her sound editor Ira Spiegel (Ken Burns's longtime collaborator) for a short while to clue me in on his work in creating the velvety flow of the picture.

Ira Spiegel with Aviva Kempner while re-recording mixer Tom Fleischman works on The Spy Behind Home Plate. Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Steven Spielberg's Saving Private Ryan and Carroll Ballard's The Black Stallion, executive produced...
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

‘Searching for Ingmar Bergman’ Film Review: Margarethe von Trotta Explores Her Love of Swedish Auteur’s Work

  • The Wrap
‘Searching for Ingmar Bergman’ Film Review: Margarethe von Trotta Explores Her Love of Swedish Auteur’s Work
In the category of culture-driven documentaries that focus on film history, a particularly enjoyable subset of that subset is the kind made by noteworthy artists themselves. There’s Martin Scorsese waxing luxuriously on Italian cinema (“My Voyage to Italy”), Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow fanboy-interviewing Brian DePalma for “DePalma,” and now, German filmmaker Margarethe von Trotta (“Hannah Arendt”) taking us on a personal tour of her lifelong admiration for Sweden’s hallowed grandmaster in the playfully inquisitive “Searching for Ingmar Bergman.”

Von Trotta’s connection to Bergman started when she was a young, New Wave-enamored film lover who responded deeply to his 1957 chess-with-Death masterpiece “The Seventh Seal”; she even opens her valentine of a documentary visiting its famed rocky beach setting, narrating the impact of its establishing shots.

When she blossomed as an artist herself as part of West Germany’s own exciting crush of post-war filmmaking talent alongside
See full article at The Wrap »

Rome Film Fest: Martin Scorsese to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award

Rome Film Fest: Martin Scorsese to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award
Martin Scorsese will be honored with the 13th annual Rome Film Fest's lifetime achievement award. Italian director Paolo Taviani will present the honor. 

The announcement was made in Rome on Tuesday by the festival's director Antonio Monda and the head of the Fondazione Cinema per Roma, Laura Delli Colli

Scorsese has long had ties to Italy. His grandparents on both sides emigrated to the United States from Palermo, Sicily. In 1999, he produced a documentary on Italian filmmakers, My Voyage to Italy, and later directed Gangs of New York in 2002 in Rome's famed Cinecitta ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

The Best Films About Filmmaking — IndieWire Critics Survey

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday.

This week’s question: In honor of “Godard Mon Amour,” Michel Hazanavicius’ movie about Jean-Luc Godard, what is the best film about filmmaking (or filmmakers)?

Matt Zoller Seitz (@mattzollerseitz), RogerEbert.com

I always thought the best movie about filmmaking, and filmmakers, and about artistry in the commercial system generally, is “Close Encounters of the Third Kind.” A lot of people have similar visions based on real life incidents, and pursue it in various creative ways, but only one makes it to the landing site, and he only succeeds because he’s devoted himself to it so singlemindedly that he throws his own family aside. He has the mind of a child and ends the film surrounded by childlike beings. All the scenes of Roy Neary trying to realize the shape through sculpture
See full article at Indiewire »

Martin Scorsese MasterClass Trailer: The Legend Has Some Lessons For You

There are few guides through cinematic history as genuinely exciting or enthusiastic as Martin Scorsese. “A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese Through American Movies” and “My Voyage to Italy” are absolutely vital viewing, and any interview with the filmmaker is more than ample proof he knows the medium almost better than anyone. And if you ever dreamed of having Scorsese teach you the craft, well it’s happening.

Continue reading Martin Scorsese MasterClass Trailer: The Legend Has Some Lessons For You at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Martin Scorsese, Jay Cocks & Rodrigo Prieto Talk ‘Silence’ At Momi

The Museum of the Moving Image has been celebrating and exploring filmmaker Martin Scorsese’s life, work, and his passion for cinema since December with a terrific exhibit drawing extensively from Scorsese’s own collection of key production material, objects from his childhood, behind-the-scenes images, and large-scale projections of scenes from his work and more. For the final weekend of the exhibit, Momi put on a full-blown retrospective of his work over two days featuring the lesser-seen, more personal Scorsese films, “A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese through American Movies,” “My Voyage to Italy (Il mio viaggio in Italia)” and docs like “No Direction Home” and “The Last Waltz.”

However, it was the impressive panel after the screening of“Silence” that brought a special salute to the exhibit in its entirety, which included cinematographer Rodrigo Prieto, screenwriter Jay Cocks, who along with co-writing “Silence,” also co-wrote “The Age of Innocence” and “Gangs of New York,
See full article at The Playlist »

A Season For Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving. After the past year of tumult, anger and divisiveness we’ve experienced in this country and around the world, to say nothing of the past couple of weeks, the concepts of thankfulness and appreciation may seem somewhat more distant and difficult to access than they might otherwise normally be. At any rate, Thanksgiving Day itself seems of late to be more about gorging on gigantic meals and, more distressingly, rampant consumerism, as Black Friday ever threatens to overtake the spirit of the day, and even the day itself—how many more seasons before it officially becomes Black Thursday? Yet here we are, a few days before that very American occasion inspired by the desire to show our gratitude for our many blessings. So in the hope of reclaiming some of the original intent of our national holiday, I’d like to send out some brief thoughts on a few
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Discover Cinematic History With The Trailer For Bertrand Tavernier’s Documentary ‘A Journey Through French Cinema’

There aren’t many films in the documentary-as-cinematic-guide genre, but Martin Scorsese has directed two of the greatest with “A Personal Journey With Martin Scorsese Through American Movies” and “My Voyage To Italy,” both of which, if the titles didn’t tip you off, are wonderful overviews of American and Italian cinema by the always engaging and passionate filmmaker. Now Bertrand Tavernier has done something similar with the three-hour-plus “A Journey Through French Cinema.”

Read More: Retrospective: The Films Of Martin Scorsese

Premiering earlier this year at the Cannes Film Festival, the film largely focuses on French cinema from the 1930s to the 1970s, with Tavernier highlighting directors both famous and obscure, as he details countless films, scenes, influences and more that have marked the medium in the country.

Continue reading Discover Cinematic History With The Trailer For Bertrand Tavernier’s Documentary ‘A Journey Through French Cinema’ at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

What’s Up Doc?: Kent Jones, Asif Kapadia & Luc Jacquet Head to Cannes

It should come as no surprise that Cannes Film Festival will play host to Kent Jones’s doc on the touchstone of filmmaking interview tomes, Hitchcock/Truffaut (see photo above). The film has been floating near the top of this list since it was announced last year as in development, while Jones himself has a history with the festival, having co-written both Arnaud Desplechin’s Jimmy P. and Martin Scorsese’s My Voyage To Italy, both of which premiered in Cannes. The film is scheduled to screen as part of the Cannes Classics sidebar alongside the likes of Stig Björkman’s Ingrid Bergman, in Her Own Words, which will play as part of the festival’s tribute to the late starlet, and Gabriel Clarke and John McKenna’s Steve McQueen: The Man & Le Mans (see trailer below). As someone who grew up watching road races with my dad in Watkins Glen,
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Watch: Martin Scorsese on The Films of Rossellini, Cassavetes, Minnelli and More

More than any other American director working today, Martin Scorsese retains perhaps the most encyclopedic set of knowledge when it comes to his cinematic forbearers. Two years ago, Fast Company distilled 85 references made throughout the course of a four hour interview on Hugo, and dubbed it “Martin Scorsese’s Film School.” Flavorpill went ahead and paired the majority of those titles with pre-existing commentary from the filmmaker’s documentaries, A Personal Journey Through American Movies and My Voyage to Italy, to create a comprehensive video essay. Watch above for Scorsese’s insight into everything from Two Weeks in Another Town to Faces, Italian Neo-Realism (Rossellini) to pre-noir gangster films (Walsh), and much more.
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Watch: Martin Scorsese on The Films of Rossellini, Cassavetes, Minnelli and More

More than any other American director working today, Martin Scorsese retains perhaps the most encyclopedic set of knowledge when it comes to his cinematic forbearers. Two years ago, Fast Company distilled 85 references made throughout the course of a four hour interview on Hugo, and dubbed it “Martin Scorsese’s Film School.” Flavorpill went ahead and paired the majority of those titles with pre-existing commentary from the filmmaker’s documentaries, A Personal Journey Through American Movies and My Voyage to Italy, to create a comprehensive video essay. Watch above for Scorsese’s insight into everything from Two Weeks in Another Town to Faces, Italian Neo-Realism (Rossellini) to pre-noir gangster films...
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

2014 TCM Classic Film Festival to Open with Gala Screening of Newly Restored Oklahoma!

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) will open the 2014 edition of the TCM Classic Film Festival with the world premiere of a brand new restoration of the beloved Rodgers & Hammerstein musical Oklahoma! (1955). TCM’s own Robert Osborne, who serves as official host for the festival, will introduce Oklahoma!, with the film’s star, Academy Award®-winner Shirley Jones, in attendance. Vanity Fair will also return for the fifth year as a festival partner and co-presenter of the opening night after-party. Marking its fifth year, the TCM Classic Film Festival will take place April 10-13, 2014, in Hollywood. The gathering will coincide withTCM’s 20th anniversary as a leading authority in classic film.

In addition, the festival has added several high-profile guests to this year’s lineup, including Oscar®-winning director William Friedkin, who will attend for the screening of the U.S. premiere restoration of his suspenseful cult classic Sorcerer (1977); Kim Novak, who
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Watch: Martin Scorsese Talks Lovingly About Film Restoration & How 'The Seven Year Itch' Spurred His Preservation Work

There are few filmmakers -- or people -- as dedicated, knowledgeable and passionate about cinema and its history as Martin Scorsese. A virtual walking encyclopedia about any corner of film lore you can think of, he remains fascinated and excited by movies and filmmakers, but in particular is concerned with making sure the early days of the art form aren't lost to the dusts of time. Through The Film Foundation and the World Cinema Foundation, he has worked tirelessly to preserve and restore films for future generations. Always an immensely compelling person to hear discuss film (just see "A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese Through American Movies" or "My Voyage To Italy" if you need proof), this brief little video is worth a spin. Recorded for the upcoming Toute la Mémoire du Monde: Festival International du Film Restauré, where Scorsese was allowed to select a handful of films to be screened,
See full article at The Playlist »

Certified Copy / The Report (Criterion)

Reviewer: Philip Tatler IV

Ratings (out of five): Certified Copy **** 1/2

The Report ****

Over the course of its 106-minute running time, Certified Copy primarily features two attractive people – Juliette Binoche and William Shimell – involved in a heated discussion about art and love. Their argument ultimately calls into question the fate of their own relationship. If this sounds like boiler plate “art house” fodder, it’s because it is. As Godfrey Cheshire remarks in the liner notes for Criterion’s release of Copy, the film “confidently revives a certain kind of European art cinema” – belonging to a tradition that includes My Voyage to Italy, My Dinner With Andre, and Richard Linklater’s Before films.
See full article at GreenCine »

Martin Scorsese’s 85 Essential Films

  • The Film Stage
I’m perfectly content to just label Martin Scorsese one of the most talented filmmakers of all time and call it a day — but I fear that would, ultimately, neglect his status as a true film historian. The living master has already exhibited his vast knowledge and deep understanding of film as an art form in two comprehensive documentaries — A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese Through American Movies and My Voyage to Italy — then expressed it to the masses this past fall with a near-masterpiece, Hugo.

It’s mind-boggling to even consider how many films Scorsese‘s seen by the age of 69 — even more interesting, though, would be that exclusive list of his favorites. And while I can’t definitively say if this list supplied to Fast Company (consisting of 85 films) would be identical, I’m nevertheless fascinated to read off these titles, along with the commentary he provides on a select few.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Competition: 'The Last Waltz' BFI bundle giveaway *Closed*

  • CineVue
The BFI will be proudly presenting Martin Scorsese's classic rockumentary The Last Waltz (1978) from 2-15 December at London's BFI Southbank. To celebrate this, we have a very special bundle to give away including a pair of tickets to the see the film, a copy of BFI Film Classics book Taxi Driver, My Voyage to Italy (1999) on DVD and an exclusive The Last Waltz film poster. This is an exclusive competition for our Facebook fans, so if you haven't already, head over to facebook.com/CineVueUK, 'Like' us, and then follow the instructions below.

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See full article at CineVue »
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