Judge John Deed (2001–2007)
7.7/10
106
3 user 1 critic

Exacting Justice 

When judge John Deed takes the case of a man who has killed the driver responsible for his daughter's death, the high court judge gets personally involved in the situation.

Director:

Alrick Riley

Writer:

G.F. Newman
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Victor Romero Evans Victor Romero Evans ... Maurice Haart
Steven Osborne Steven Osborne ... Alex Redburn
Steven Elliot Steven Elliot ... Sergeant Bridges (as Steven Elliott)
Doug Bradley ... Inspector Lannon
Martin Shaw ... Judge John Deed
David Sibley David Sibley ... Paul Frant
Martin Reeve Martin Reeve ... Mike Peters
Colin Salmon ... Willy Radcliff
Barbara Thorn Barbara Thorn ... Rita 'Coop' Cooper
David Norman David Norman ... Stephen Ashurst (as Dave Norman)
Louisa Clein ... Charlie Deed
Tom Harper ... Rory Brown
T.R. Bowen T.R. Bowen ... Mr. Justice Michael Nivan (as Trevor Bowen)
Tim Munro Tim Munro ... Norman Children
Lisa Millett ... Jury Forewoman (as Lisa Millet)
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Storyline

Four months after his daughter is killed in a traffic accident, Maurice Hart legally purchases a shotgun and kills the driver who had been acquitted of any criminal responsibility. The defendant refuses to testify in his defense but Judge Deed does his best to ensure a balanced presentation of the evidence. The Lord Chancellor's Department has grown tired of Deed's aggressive behavior and develop a plan to force his resignation. Judge Deed's daughter, Charlie, starts university and falls in with activists and needs both her father's and her grandfather's assistance to get her friend off. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

judge | legal | See All (2) »

Genres:

Crime | Drama | Mystery

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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

9 January 2001 (UK) See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color
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Did You Know?

Trivia

High Court Judges in England and Wales can be referred to in one of a number of ways:
  • Judge John Deed (as per the title of the show, although few High Court Judges are actually go by the title of 'Judge')
  • The Honourable Mr Justice Deed (as his name would appear on official court documentation)
  • Mr Justice Deed (the correct way to refer to a Judge in conversation)
  • Sir John Deed (this is the correct way to refer to Judge in his presence as all High Court Judges are Knights and Dames of the Realm)
  • Deed J ('J' meaning 'Justice', the appropriate legal abbreviation for Judges' titles in all English law reports)
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Connections

Followed by Judge John Deed (2001) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Long winded, slow and unbelievable. But thoroughly entertaining!
10 December 2001 | by Gandalf the WhiteSee all my reviews

This drama, about the womanizing, arrogant, larger than life Judge John Deed is extremely watchable, if not a little flawed. It does not take long for the idea that Deed's character is a little unreal, but who cares this is TV.

Martin Shaw is excellent as the judge with a high idealistic stance when it comes to applying the letter of the law, and complete lack of morals when it comes to choosing who he shares a bed with. Or desk, car, floor.....

The court scenes are a little irritating where the supposedly impartial Judge seems obsessed on becoming either the defence or prosecution depending on his quickly conceived point of view. If this is typical of the British justice system I'm not surprised that most major cases seem to go to appeal. His fight against political interference is a better storyline as his stubbornness frustrates Rochester and his cronies, who are continually plotting how next to stab him in the back.

The supporting cast is excellent, with Jenny Seagrove and Jemma Redgrave oozing sex appeal as the two main objects of Deed's desire. Also worthy of a mention is the very natural performance of Louisa Clein as Deed's product of a broken home, pro-activist, university student daughter.

Overall this is an excellent addition to the BBC's line up which has been lacking enough good drama series. Though it is not quite good enough to fill the void left by Channel 4's near perfect North Square. I will stay glued for the rest of the series and hopefully this, unlike North Square, will have another series commissioned.

8/10


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