6.4/10
1,036
44 user 11 critic

Searching for Debra Winger (2002)

Trailer
2:28 | Trailer

On Disc

at Amazon

Rosanna Arquette talks to various actresses about the pressures they face as women working in the entertainment industry.

Director:

Rosanna Arquette

Writer:

Rosanna Arquette (experiencer)
Reviews
1 nomination. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Patricia Arquette ... Herself
Rosanna Arquette ... Herself
Emmanuelle Béart ... Herself
Katrin Cartlidge ... Herself
Laura Dern ... Herself
Roger Ebert ... Himself
Jane Fonda ... Herself
Teri Garr ... Herself
Whoopi Goldberg ... Herself
Melanie Griffith ... Herself
Daryl Hannah ... Herself
Salma Hayek ... Herself
Holly Hunter ... Herself
Diane Lane ... Herself
Kelly Lynch ... Herself
Edit

Storyline

Rosanna Arquette informally interviews several contrasting actresses about how they cope with being a woman in the entertainment industry. The chauvenism of male crew is discussed, the pretentiousness / stereotyping of female characters in American film now. Interviews include those with Alley Sheedy, Martha Plimpton, Debra Winger, Emmanual Beart, and Rosanna's sister, Patricia Arquette -among others. Although a documentary this film seems affected, Arquette never has an argument, never says anything bad about another actress, in fact, complimenting just about everyone of them as being her favourite actress. Written by kerryn wedgwood

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

13 July 2002 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Buscando a Debra Winger See more »

Filming Locations:

Cannes, Alpes-Maritimes, France See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$600,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (DVD)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Screened as one of "out-of-competition" films at the Cannes Film Festival, May 2002. Director Rosanna Arquette says she made the documentary when she was struck by the fact that Debra Winger, who earned three Oscar nominations, had left the profession in her 30s. See more »

Quotes

Ally Sheedy: Or even if you have to walk in, in a tight fitting shirt and look sexy. You know what I mean? It's like that's what you're about in that scene, that stays with you for the whole day and it goes on and on and on. And then people say 'why are there so many 13 year olds that are bulimic?' Hello.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Instead of saying a Rosanna Arquette film, it says a Rosanna Arquette Experience and instead of saying Directed by, it says Experienced by Rosanna Arquette. See more »

Connections

References Lara Croft: Tomb Raider (2001) See more »

Soundtracks

Je T'adore
(Jaime Perkins)
Courtesy of Promusic, Inc.
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Good Intentions Gone Awry
21 August 2003 | by ambimomSee all my reviews

I wanted to like this movie, I really did, but it's a mess. As well-intentioned as is Roseanna Arquette, there's no real point to this film.

Obviously, Arquette was able to secure the confessions of some of the finest actresses of our times, but instead of drawing on the "Red Shoes" theme, we are subjected to an inchoate collection of let's face it, silly laments.

Though not meant to be, a lot of these diatribes are insulting to women who struggle along in boring jobs, barely able to make ends meet while juggling marriages, kids and art without benefit of nannies, private jets and personal assistants.

Instead of discussing the struggle of art v. children, or career v. marriage as was promised in the opening monologue, this movie is about extraordinarily beautiful women who want our sympathy because they no longer receive the enormous privileges they received when they were more desirable to the men who make movies.

I love Theresa Russell, I really do, but she comes off like a selfish, prom queen who isn't getting enough attention. Laughable but sad is Melanie Griffith who obviously knows the joys of Botox and collagen but still cringes at the sexism to which she is subjected by the industry that made her rich. Jane Fonda, on the other hand, is as loopy as she was when Ed Murrow interviewed her 40 years ago on "Person to Person."

At least two of the screen goddesses interviewed -- Diane Lane and Sharon Stone-- have already altered their pronouncements: Lane who allegedly can't fit a man into her life is remarrying and Stone who finally met the perfect mate is divorcing.

The only person in this documentary who makes any sense at all is Terri Garr. I've always liked her and now I like her even more. The problem is no one is listening to Garr, though she still works all the time, even with a disability. And thankfully, Debra Winger comes off sane and sensible.

Get a grip girls. The rest of us mortal women of a certain age struggle throughout life, not just when we enter menopause. I am competing with 20 year olds in my workplace, just the same as you.

What was it that F. Scott Fitzgerald said? "The rich are different from you and I?" I guess the same is true of actresses.


31 of 43 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 44 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Action and Adventure Titles With Prime Video

Explore popular action and adventure titles available to stream with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed