Tipping the Velvet (2002) - News Poster

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‘Killing Eve’ Producer Sally Woodward Gentle On Making “Quietly Subversive” TV As She Prepares For Season Three

Sally Woodward Gentle, who runs Killing Eve producer Sid Gentle Films, is a mischief maker with a hit on her hands. Her BBC America spy thriller is a ratings success story and she has a development drawer full of “quietly subversive” projects.

Sitting down with Deadline to discuss how the Phoebe Waller-Bridge-penned series went from development hell in Britain to a U.S. cultural phenomenon, and on how she’s getting on with season three to take advantage of the British drama boom, it’s clear that Woodward Gentle is a rabble-rouser surrounded by renegades.

Woodward Gentle has worked for some of the biggest names in British scripted television as creative director of the BBC’s in-house drama division, Broadchurch producer Kudos and Downton Abbey producer Carnival before setting up her own shop in 2013. She has worked on controversial shows, such as the BBC’s Tipping The Velvet, and
See full article at Deadline »

TV offering for Lgbt viewers is impressive | Letters

Allegra Madgwick agrees with Owen Jones that Queer as Folk was groundbreaking, but says there is more out there

While agreeing with Owen Jones about the groundbreaking nature of the show, albeit with the caveat that it wasn’t so compelling for lesbians, it concerns me that he seems to have missed some great queer British TV over the past 20 years.

Honourable mention needs to go to Sugar Rush, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit, Tipping the Velvet, Portrait of a Marriage, The Bisexual and Tales of the City. There were also sympathetic and credible gay characters in This Life, Brideshead Revisited and Torchwood. Popular soap operas have also had fantastic gay/lesbian storylines that brought gay lives into the mainstream. As well as dramatic output, Channel 4’s eclectic documentary Out on Tuesday covered a wide range of Lgbt issues in Britain and was staffed largely by lesbian and gay media folk.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

ITV’s Royals Drama ‘Victoria’ Adds ‘Harlots’ & ‘Lewis’ Stars With Third Season Shoot Underway

  • Deadline
Laurence Fox (Lewis) and Kate Fleetwood (Harlots) are joining the third season of ITV’s hit royals drama Victoria (first look pictured), with filming now underway in the UK.

Produced by Mammoth Screen as a co-production with Masterpiece, and created by writer and producer Daisy Goodwin, the new series sees Jenna Coleman (Doctor Who) reprise her role as the eponymous young Queen, alongside Tom Hughes (Paula) as Prince Albert. Fox will play charismatic and wayward Foreign Secretary Lord Palmerston, whilst Fleetwood will play Victoria’s mysterious sister Feodora.

Also joining the cast are actor and comedian John Sessions (The Loch) as Prime Minister John Russell, Lily Travers (Kingsman) as the Duchess of Monmouth, Nicholas Audsley (The White Princess), David Burnett (The Mummy) and Emily Forbes (Endeavour).

Starting in 1848, the third installment of the period drama will depict a turbulent and uncertain time for Europe and the monarchy. With revolutions on
See full article at Deadline »

Sarah Waters: ‘The Handmaiden turns pornography into a spectacle – but it's true to my novel'

Waters’ hit novel Fingersmith, about a lesbian love affair in Victorian England, has been transported to 1930s Korea for a new film. The author explains how it remains faithful to her original

“‘You pearl,’ I said. So white she was.” With these words, Sarah Waters confirmed the arrival of a world-class writer capable of turning conventional literary erotics upside-down and inside-out. The dialogue is uttered in a scene of lesbian lovemaking that has been cited by both male and female, gay and heterosexual commentators as one of the sexiest encounters in literature.

Waters’ first two novels, Tipping the Velvet and Affinity, had signalled a powerful new voice in lesbian fiction, but Fingersmith took it to a new level, its kaleidoscopic prose and structure creating a dizzying variety of desires and perspectives. Shortlisted for the Booker prize, it was one of David Bowie’s 100 must-read novels and has had a lusty afterlife in theatre and TV.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Sarah Waters: ‘The Handmaiden turns pornography into a spectacle – but it's true to my novel'

Waters’ hit novel Fingersmith, about a lesbian love affair in Victorian England, has been transported to 1930s Korea for a new film. The author explains how it remains faithful to her original

“‘You pearl,’ I said. So white she was.” With these words, Sarah Waters confirmed the arrival of a world-class writer capable of turning conventional literary erotics upside-down and inside-out. The dialogue is uttered in a scene of lesbian lovemaking that has been cited by both male and female, gay and heterosexual commentators as one of the sexiest encounters in literature.

Waters’ first two novels, Tipping the Velvet and Affinity, had signalled a powerful new voice in lesbian fiction, but Fingersmith took it to a new level, its kaleidoscopic prose and structure creating a dizzying variety of desires and perspectives. Shortlisted for the Booker prize, it was one of David Bowie’s 100 must-read novels and has had a lusty afterlife in theatre and TV.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

On my radar: Sarah Waters’s cultural highlights

The novelist on unusual cinema experiences, Lgbtq history and the genius of Happy Valley

Born in Wales in 1966, Sarah Waters studied English at the University of Kent, followed by Lancaster University and Queen Mary’s, where her PhD thesis focused on lesbian and gay historical fiction. Immediately afterwards she started working on her first novel, Tipping the Velvet (a title taken from 19th-century pornography), which was published in 1998. Waters has won a number of awards: in 2003 alone, she was named one of Granta’s 20 best young British writers, received the South Bank award for literature, and was named author of the year at the British Book Awards. The stage adaptation of her 2006 novel The Night Watch is on at Manchester’s Royal Exchange until 18 June.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Noël Coward’s hilarious masterpiece, Private Lives to tour the UK

A major revival of Noël Coward’s hilarious masterpiece, Private Lives will embark on a prior to the West End UK tour starring stage and screen stars Tom Chambers (Top Hat, Strictly Come Dancing) as the loveable and charming Elyot and Laura Rogers (Tipping The Velvet, An Ideal Husband) as the unconventional and vivacious Amanda, alongside Charlotte Ritchie (Call The Midwife, One Night in November) as Sybil and Richard Teverson (Downton Abbey) as Victor.

This glittering production of one of the greatest plays of all time, with the opening weekend at the New Victoria Theatre, Woking, on Fri 15 – 16 January 2016, directed by Tom Attenborough, with designs by Lucy Osborne, lighting by Oliver Fenwick and sound by Gregory Clarke.

Other confirmed venues for this major new production of Private Lives include the Churchill Theatre, Bromley (18-23 January), Regent Theatre, Stoke-on-Trent (25-30 January), Theatre Royal, Brighton (1-6 February), New Alexandra Theatre, Birmingham (8-
See full article at The Hollywood News »

9 bodice ripping period dramas - from the steamy to the sodden

Prithee, my lord, loosen our corsets and unbutton our breeches. This week has seen a new wave of period drama steam, from Natalie Dormer's BBC film The Scandalous Lady W to the furore about the 'pornographic' new adaptation of Lady Chatterley's Lover.

But they're hardly the first shows to bare historical breasts and bottoms. Here's our 9 favourite saucy costume dramas...

Pride and Prejudice

Ooh, Mr Darcy. We'll ease you in gently with the BBC's iconic 1995 Pride and Prejudice miniseries, fondly remembered for the scene in which Colin Firth's dashing hero takes a dip in the Pemberley lake and emerges to greet his unexpected guests, dripping like a dolphin in a wet T-shirt contest.

While it may have shocked your grandma, this is pretty tame stuff.

Tipping the Velvet

Classic 19th century literature isn't known for its portrayal of lesbian love but Sarah Waters set out to right this
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

The lady's not for turning: cinematic portrayals of lesbians need to get real

Films about lesbians too often involve the conversion of a younger, straight woman by an older gay woman. It’s time to drop the predatory trope

I first read Patricia Highsmith’s The Price of Salt (or Carol, as the film adaptation will be called) during a year abroad in Oslo, on a course module titled homotextuality: gay and lesbian literature.

While perfecting the art of discussing explicit novels in an academic scenario (there are only so many euphemisms for orgasm), I noticed that the trope of “queer woman converts younger hetero woman” appeared frequently throughout the lesbian canon. Novels such as Tipping the Velvet and Loving Her have this narrative, as do some well-known films: the 1996 Bound, directed by the Wachowskis, and the Palme d’Or-winning Blue Is the Warmest Colour, both show ostensibly straight women embarking on relationships after a slight nudge from a lesbian encounter. Converting the straight girl,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Benedict Cumberbatch Knows He Has a 'Weird Face,' Thanks

As part of BAFTA's "In Conversation" series, Benedict Cumberbatch revealed the secret to his success. Specifically, how can one man go between absolutely killing it in stage productions to convincing Hollywood he's a man of 1,000 faces and numerous eras, from Victorian-era England ("Tipping the Velvet") to the future ("Star Trek Into Darkness")?

Simply put, it's "the blessing of having a weird face." Specifically, "somewhere between an otter and something people find vaguely attractive. Or just an otter, which is vaguely attractive!" (Yep, he knows about that otter meme.)

Cumberbatch then goes on to explain his confusion over being on "these hottie lists" after being in the biz for over 10 years with, you know, the same face he's always had. "I started out and went, yeah, I'm not a typical beauty, so basically I've got a long neck and a long face. That's usually period [pieces]. That's usually some kind of inbreeding weirdness,
See full article at Moviefone »

Afternoon Delight: Ilene Chaiken's "Black Box," Cate Blanchett stars with Sally Hawkins in "Blue Jasmine"

Tags: Afternoon DelightTrue BloodIlene ChaikenThe Black BoxNurse JackieOlivia MunnIMDbCate BlanchettSally HawkinsJane LynchTegan and Sara

Good afternoon, happy Friday and happy Pride Los Angeles!

Happy birthday to Sarah Parish, Kim Rhodes, Anna Kournikova and Jenny Jones!

Ilene Chaiken returns to television with The Black Box. ABC has ordered 13 episodes of the drama that centers on a neuroscientist named Elizabeth Black. Chaiken will serve as showrunner and one of the executive producers. X-Men director Bryan Singer will also executive produce the series, which is set to premiere in January 2014.

Photo by David Livingston/Getty Images

Wanna see Tegan and Sara in London? Then tweet them fast!

Tweet #CloserToTnS + #London for a chance to win 2 tix for Jun 11@troxy_london! Going to be a great show! Lots of #Heartthrob and oldies!

— Tegan and Sara (@teganandsara) June 7, 2013

Nurse Jackie has been renewed by Showtime for a sixth season.

Olivia Munn graces the cover of July’s Flare magazine.
See full article at AfterEllen.com »

Martin Freeman, Keeley Hawes and Andrew Lincoln: Bafta TV awards 2013

Three big stars of the small screen reveal their television secrets

Martin Freeman: the unexpected hero

It's a testament to Martin Freeman's love of his character Watson in Sherlock that he originally turned down the role of Bilbo Baggins in The Hobbit to make series two. "I desperately wanted to do the film, but it clashed," he remembers. "And so I had to say goodbye to The Hobbit. I just couldn't go to New Zealand." Desperate not to lose him, The Hobbit pushed back production, and, well, we know the rest. "I have two of the most amazing jobs that exist in television and film right now. It sounds very arrogant, but it's true."

He continues to be amazed at the hysteria surrounding Sherlock: "We've had hordes of fans screaming and trying to film us on their iPhones while we've been on location for the third series.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

UKTV launches new Freeview channel Drama

UKTV has announced new Freeview channel Drama.

The station will launch on July 8 and feature shows including Pride and Prejudice, Catherine Cookson's The Cinder Path, Sharpe, Tipping The Velvet, Auf Wiedersehen Pet, Cranford and Lark Rise to Candleford.

UKTV controller Emma Tennant said: "Drama is targeted at a different audience demographic than our other highly successful free-to-air channels, Dave, Yesterday and Really.

"The channel is aimed at people who simply love drama and want to watch critically-acclaimed shows that have absolutely defined the landscape of British television."

She added: "I am very passionate about the subject and discussing the programmes that will create Drama's schedule has just been brilliant fun.

"I'm genuinely excited about the launch of Drama both as a viewer and as controller."

General manager of drama Adrian Wills added: "Drama lovers' prayers have been answered.

"This channel represents the best drama content within the genre and
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

What do we know about Doctor Who series 7 part 2?

Feature Cameron K McEwan 12 Mar 2013 - 07:00

Cameron provides a ready reckoner of what we know so far about the 8 new Doctor Who episodes starting later this month...

Warning: contains potential spoilers aplenty.

We are less than three weeks away from the world's greatest television show returning to our screens and, like the Doctor Who 50th Anniversary Special, rumours are flying higher than a Dalek on doomsday.

But what do we actually know about the upcoming series - what is fact and what is just a made-up internet rumour? As with previous years, not all the episodes have confirmed titles (despite what other sites may say), so let's have a look at what's coming up, starting on the 30th of March.

Episode 1 - The Bells of St John

We know the opener features Star Wars: The Phantom Menace actress Celia Imrie and that it is set in contemporary London.
See full article at Den of Geek »

"House of Cards" Scribe Pens "War & Peace"

Legendary British TV scribe Andrew Davies has been hired to pen a six episode TV mini-series adaptation of Leo Tolstoy's classic "War and Peace" for The BBC. The project is scheduled to air on BBC One in 2015.

The story will remain based in war-torn 19th century Russia. Many of the philosophical elements are expected to be left out, with the series focusing on the human interactions, romance and family conflicts.

Davies penned the adaptation of the original UK "House of Cards" mini-series and its two sequels, along with film adaptations such as "Bridget Jones' Diary," "The Tailor of Panama," and "Brideshead Revisited".

He has worked on numerous mini-series including 1994's "Middlemarch," 1995's "Pride and Prejudice," 1998's "Vanity Fair," 1999's "Wives and Daughters," 2002's "Tipping the Velvet," 2005's "Bleak House," 2007's "Fanny Hill," 2008's "Little Dorrit," 2008's "Sense and Sensibility" and 2011's "South Riding."

Source: The Radio Times
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Seriously Sexy: Ladies in suits

Tags: Florence WelchBritney SpearsJanelle MonaeShania TwainPinkJanet JacksonGrace JonesWhitney HoustonIMDbSeriously Sexy

One time on How I Met Your Mother, Barney Stinson was moved to burst into song as he contemplated the eternal struggle between his two favorite things: girls versus suits. Dearest Barney, don’t sell yourself short! It’s not a struggle between one or the other! The beauty lies in both!

Ladies in suits have been on my mind a lot lately. One doesn’t ever really need a specific reason to think about ladies in suits, just as one never needs an excuse to think about ice cream or puppies or sharp cheddar cheese or boobs or any other number of Things In Life That Are Good. Still, the cross-dressing thing has been in the forefront of my mind for a couple reasons, one being all the Tipping the Velvet talk going on last month, the other being Florence Welch,
See full article at AfterEllen.com »

Benedict Cumberbatch: naturally he's a class act | Observer profile

Long before Sherlock, Tinker Tailor or this week's Parade's End, the actor has won plaudits for his work on stage and screen. And his success has had nothing to do with going to Harrow

While being delightedly force-fed 17 days of splendid drama, one annual question has remained resolutely unasked in medialand this August: when will the silly season start?

Worry no more. It kicked in almost as soon as the last firework fizzed out over the last athlete's hangover. It kicked in with something of a confected row over Benedict Cumberbatch – yet a row that has puttered on, because it's about one of those British things about which no consensus can ever be reached yet on which everybody wants an opinion: class. Or Class

On BBC's Breakfast, there were still talking heads debating whether Cumberbatch had been right to "moan" about the occasional sniping he got for being a "posh" actor in this country.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Rachael Stirling and her Dame Mom in Doctor Who 7 with Jenna-Louise Coleman

Doctor Who series 7 is starting to load up its guest cast for the upcoming new season, one that will bring forth a new companion for the current Doctor, Matt Smith, in the form of too cute to live Jenna-Louise Coleman (who replaces too cute Karen Gillan – see theme). BBC has released the word that Doctor Who will be a family affair in part this season, locking up appearances by both Rachael Stirling and her Dame mother Diana Rigg, who will appear for the first time on screen together (though they are both credited in In The Beginning) in the english Science Fiction series. Edit: You can see pics of the duo shooting the episode here.

related | Jenna-louise Coleman With Doctor Who Matt Smith

The BBC offers that the combo will be a “a mother and daughter with a dark secret” and that they will specifically appear in an episode with the aforementioned new companion,
See full article at Boomtron »

Doctor Who Recruits The Avengers' Diana Rigg

Doctor Who Recruits The Avengers' Diana Rigg
Doctor Who will hang with one very groovy lady when Dame Diana Rigg aka The Avengers‘ Emma Peel guest-stars on the BBC series next season.

And joining Rigg for her trip with the Time Lord will be her real-life daughter, Rachael Stirling, the BBC reports.

Related | Doctor Who Casts New Companion: Find Out When She’ll Arrive

In an episode filming this week with series star Matt Smith and new companion Jenna-Louise Coleman, Rigg and Stirling will play a Yorkshire local and her daughter, who together share a “dark secret.”

“The first time Rachie and I will be working together
See full article at TVLine.com »

Constellations; Travelling Light; Man in the Middle – review

Royal Court; Lyttelton; Theatre503, London

Every now and then the Royal Court does this. It throws up a small-cast, depth-charge production that makes bigger dramas look over-stuffed and under-nourished. It did so metaphysically with Caryl Churchill's A Number and emotionally with Mike Bartlett's Cock. It has done so again with Nick Payne's wiry new play.

Constellations is a love story that investigates ideas about time. Or it's a look at theories about time that takes the form of a love story. It tells us that we may have no such thing as free will, but leaves its audience to make up its own mind. Following the lead given 14 years ago by Michael Frayn's Copenhagen, in which a scientific theory is demonstrated in the structure of the play that discusses it, Constellations embodies its doubts and questions. It quizzes the notion of destiny by giving alternative versions
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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