The House in the Woods (1913)

Major Morris, a country gentleman, has an adopted daughter, Marian Lane, to whom he proposes to leave his fortune. His nephew, George Morris, is in love with Marian, but more particularly ... See full summary »
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
Ormi Hawley ... Marian Lane
Guy D'Ennery ... Alfred Earle - a Young Artist
Irving White Irving White ... Maj. Morris - Marian's Father
Jim Moore Jim Moore ... George Morris - the Villainous Nephew
Clarence Elmer ... Sam - the Faithful Negro Servant
Edit

Storyline

Major Morris, a country gentleman, has an adopted daughter, Marian Lane, to whom he proposes to leave his fortune. His nephew, George Morris, is in love with Marian, but more particularly with her prospective wealth. Wishing to obtain a portrait of her, Morris engages a young artist, Alfred Earle, The picture is painted in the style of a famous masterpiece. A speedy attachment springs up between Marian and Earle. George, jealous, comes upon Marian's picture one day at its completion, and, taking a knife, rents it. Earle declares his love, the major consents and Earle and Marian are married. The major gives them a pretty bungalow on his estate, called "The House in The Woods." They take possession, and for a time all goes well. Then George begins the machinations whereby he effects an estrangement between his uncle and Marian. A famous portrait in the major's library mysteriously disappears, George, who has himself stolen it, convinces his uncle that it was taken by Earle and sold for ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Short

Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

31 January 1913 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

This picture's shortcoming lies mostly in the abruptness of its transitions
16 July 2017 | by deickemeyerSee all my reviews

A melodramatic picture with some beautiful sets, and which is perfectly photographed. Melodramas are very acceptable to spectators when they convince the emotions: they do not need necessarily to convince the mind. This picture's shortcoming lies mostly in the abruptness of its transitions. For instance, the girl's father gets word from his villainous nephew that his son-in-law has stolen his valuable painting. No proof is offered, but the old man puts on his coat and .goes to the "house in the woods" and. after a short conversation that seems to consist mostly of "You did" or "I didn't," sends his daughter and her husband out of the house that he owns. All the trouble that the author took to make us believe this is to make the father into a foster father. It doesn't convince the emotions. Eleanor Kinkhead is the authoress of the story. Ormi Hawley plays the lead, with Guy D'Ennery as the hero. Irving White is the father, and James Moore the villain who in the end confesses. Clarence Elmer deserves credit as the old darkie butler. - The Moving Picture World, February 15, 1913


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See one user review »

Contribute to This Page

Free Movies and TV Shows You Can Watch Now

On IMDb TV, you can catch Hollywood hits and popular TV series at no cost. Select any poster below to play the movie, totally free!

Browse free movies and TV series



Recently Viewed