7.3/10
40,785
84 user 63 critic

Candy (2006)

Trailer
1:52 | Trailer

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A poet falls in love with an art student who gravitates to his bohemian lifestyle -- and his love of heroin. Hooked as much on one another as they are on the drug, their relationship alternates between states of oblivion, self-destruction, and despair.

Director:

Neil Armfield

Writers:

Luke Davies (novel), Neil Armfield (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
6 wins & 17 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Abbie Cornish ... Candy
Heath Ledger ... Dan
Geoffrey Rush ... Casper
Tom Budge ... Schumann
Roberto Meza Mont ... Jorge
Tony Martin ... Mr. Wyatt
Noni Hazlehurst ... Mrs. Wyatt
Holly Austin ... Sunglasses Shop Assistant
Craig Moraghan Craig Moraghan ... Washing Machine Dealer
John Lee John Lee ... Hock Shop Man
Noel Herriman Noel Herriman ... Celebrant
Tim McKenzie Tim McKenzie ... Uncle Rod
Tara Morice ... Aunt Katherine
Maddi Newling Maddi Newling ... Janey
Patricia Lemon Patricia Lemon ... Wedding Guest
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Storyline

This story is a narration from an Australian man who falls in love with two kinds of Candy: a woman of the same name and heroin. The narrator changes from a smart-aleck to someone trying to find a vein to inject, while Candy changes from an actress, call girl, streetwalker, and then a madwoman. Starting in Sydney, the two eventually end up in Melbourne to go clean, but they fail. This leads them to turn to finding money and heroin, while other posessions and attachments become unimportant. Written by Godiva4862

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

More is never enough. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for pervasive depiction of drug addiction, disturbing images, language, sexual content and nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

Australia

Language:

English

Release Date:

25 May 2006 (Australia) See more »

Also Known As:

Candy - Reise der Engel See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$202,744 (Australia), 26 May 2006, Limited Release

Opening Weekend USA:

$3,646, 19 November 2006, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$44,720, 4 February 2007
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(uncut)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The man who gives Dan and Candy the milk cartons is Luke Davies, the author of the novel "Candy" the movie is based on. See more »

Goofs

The copyright statement "Ownership of this motion picture is protected by copyright and other applicable laws, and any unauthorized duplication, distribution or exhibition of this motion picture could result in criminal prosecution as well as civil liability" appears to times back-to-back at the end of the end credits. See more »

Quotes

Dan: We had a lot going for us. We'd found the secret glue that held all things together. In a perfect place, where the noise did not intrude, our world was so very complete.
See more »

Connections

References The 400 Blows (1959) See more »

Soundtracks

Ave Vernum Corpus (KV 618)
Written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (as W.A.Mozart)
Performed by Sydney Philharmonia Choir & Sydney Symphony Orchestra
Conducted by Stuart Challender
Used by arrangement with ABC Classics
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
"Everything we ever did we did with the best of intentions."
13 November 2006 | by Flagrant-BaronessaSee all my reviews

What a gripping film this is, not because of the enormous tragedy of its characters, but because of their goodness. Another user suggested ''Trainspotting'' meets ''Romeo + Juliet'' which I believe is an apt summary of Neil Armfield's Aussie gem Candy – the kind of film that takes you and shakes you with harrowing bleak portrayals juxtaposed with the euphoric state of romance. Although it is not devoid of faults, the film trumps most other films I've seen this year at the Stockholm Film Festival because of sheer emotional impact.

But Candy opens on a hypnotic note of false security; lovable slacker Dan (Heath Ledger) and bohemian art student Candy (Abbie Cornish) indulge in drug-induced games, smiling, laughing, kissing, even playing with children. In the next scene Candy almost ODs in the bathtub, and the film bravely swoops down and offers us a look at something infinitely more unpleasant: drug addiction. Indeed, 'Candy' was largely being advertised as a romance for reasons I cannot pretend to understand, other than perhaps the shock factor in abandoning gushy romance for a bruised reality. The truth of the matter is that it offers one of the most unflinching looks into seedy junkie lives since Reqiuem For a Dream.

The cast give fine and sometimes even excellent performances. Geoffrey Rush lends his dutiful Aussie charm to the supporting role of an 'accidental mentor' of sorts to Dan and Candy – "the father I always wanted, the one who buys you fizzy drinks and candy", remarks Dan in the introduction and we thereby know early on that his character is perhaps not a flawless or ethical one. Ledger is constantly pending between likable and loser in the film, and it is thanks to his apt narrative of events that he remains so well centred in the heart of 'Candy' (which should rightfully be titled 'Dan'). As a clever technique by first-time director Armfield, Ledger's soft-spoken narrative becomes punctured, mercilessly abandoning us in a time when we need it the most – when the seedy circumstances become too dire.

But the big surprise is Abbie Cornish who is now regrettably stirring up more buzz with the Phillippe-Witherspoon split than with her remarkably bruised performance as the tragic heroine, Candy. She captures the escalating despair, desperation and nihilism of her character effortlessly and translates it with great emotional transparency. Soon she has resorted to full-time prostitution to get money for hits, and it is just heartrending. In particular there is a poignant and emotional scene with Candy and her father embracing after a shocking bit of news that cements the chaos Dan and Candy have gotten themselves in.

Interestingly enough, 'Candy' is explicitly divided into three titled segments that pop up on the screen: heaven, earth and hell and it does a great job at portraying all three, uninhibitedly navigating the contrasts that form at their transitions. The soft-spoken words, love-making, drug-induced romantic euphoria and intimate caressing of the 'heaven' segment render 'hell' all the more harrowing, although I must remark that I found 'earth' to be by far the most graphic and difficult to watch. This can best be attributed to the scenes in which Dan and Candy try to lose their heroin addictions and lay suffering for days on a mattress, Trainspotting-style.

In the end, 'Candy' remains – much like its peers, a cautionary tale of the horrors of drug life and how addiction can mess you up, and mess with relationships. Although there are few discernible flaws that jump out and grab you, the attempted humour simply isn't in-tune and it is needed as a tension-easer at times. Owing to this, Candy sadly offers little light at the end of the tunnel and it is far too easy to lose yourself in the gloom hopelessness. Yet most of this is compensated for by great performances of intrinsically good people that you cannot help rooting for, as Dan says: "Everything we ever did we did with the best of intentions."

8 out of 10


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