77 Sunset Strip (1958–1964)
6.6/10
37
9 user

5: Part 1 

Stuart Bailey, now operating a one-man detective agency, is summoned to New York by Vincent Marion. Marion wants Bailey to buy his late younger brother Andy's way to heaven -- by making ... See full summary »

Director:

William Conrad

Writer:

Harry Essex (teleplay)
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Efrem Zimbalist Jr. ... Stuart Bailey
Richard Conte ... Detective Lieut. Butter
Wally Cox ... Harold Harrison
Peter Lorre ... The Gypsy
Herbert Marshall ... Father Anthony
Diane McBain ... Carla Stevens
Burgess Meredith ... Vincent Marion
Joseph Schildkraut ... Mr. Stehlik
William Shatner ... Paul DeVinger
Walter Slezak ... Oskar Pauker
Ed Wynn ... Feigenstein
Keenan Wynn ... Lolly
Patricia Rainier Patricia Rainier ... Eva Stehlik
George E. Stone ... Mr. DeVinger
Jimmy Murphy Jimmy Murphy ... Leroy
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Storyline

Stuart Bailey, now operating a one-man detective agency, is summoned to New York by Vincent Marion. Marion wants Bailey to buy his late younger brother Andy's way to heaven -- by making amends to those who Andy has wronged during a wasted life. Bailey must contend with a hostile New York City police detective and various characters whose motives are unclear. Bailey has $9,000 that Andy Marion left. But Andy's debts likely far outweigh the money. One mystery is Carla Stevens, who is following the detective. As the first part ends, Bailey lies in the basement of an apartment building after having been attacked by a thug. Written by Bill Koenig

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Genres:

Action | Crime | Drama

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | German | Yiddish

Release Date:

20 September 1963 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The 77 Sunset Strip theme song is not played at the beginning or end of the program. See more »

Quotes

[first lines - part 3]
Announcer: As Brother Hendrickson
Telly Savalas: Telly Savalas
Announcer: As Mr. Strelich
Joseph Schildkraut: Joseph Schilkkraut
Announcer: As Paul DeVinger
William Shatner: William Shatner
Announcer: As Oskar Pauker
Walter Slezak: Walter Slezak
Announcer: As Cal Jasper
[...]
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Crazy Credits

Apart from the obviously new theme song and opening credits, beginning with this episode the writing and directing credits were moved to the top of the show. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Stu Bailey, now suddenly a solo PI, slogs through a myriad of clues and an all-star cast, to figure out why "the devil" was run over in the opening scene.
3 October 2017 | by psyclops-92382See all my reviews

I was a teen when my favorite TV show had its fall premiere in 1963 with this five part episode. I hated it and, without warning, the total revamp of the series. All my favorite characters were gone, without explanation, and suddenly Stu Bailey no longer worked at 77 Sunset Strip....despite the show's name. All they kept was EZ, Jr. and the show name, and they changed Bailey's personality significantly from an easy-going PI who got along well with the police, to a terse PI who maintained the typical film-noir antagonism with the cops.

I felt totally betrayed by the show's producers and there was no way I was prepared to accept this "abomination", so I stopped watching and was not surprised when I heard it was canceled in mid-season. Watching these episodes now fifty years later, as an older adult, they actually were fairly well done if you're a fan of the film-noir style, a hard-bitten detective slinging along solo and taking on all comers.

On its own, this five-part season opener and the subsequent episodes hold up well...as a totally separate show. My opinion is that Jack Webb and William Conrad shot themselves, and the show, in the foot by trying to hold onto the show's audience by keeping same name. If they had changed the name of the show, say to "Stu Bailey, PI", and opened the first episode with some explanation as to why the dramatic change, it might have worked better and held an adult audience. As it was, us kids back then could not accept it...we wanted our Kookie!


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