Batman (1966–1968)
8.4/10
150
1 user

Flop Goes the Joker 

After thoroughly bamboozling his young patron, the Joker makes his move against the Gotham City Museum for a grand extortion scheme.

Director:

George Waggner (as george waGGner)

Writers:

Stanford Sherman, Bob Kane (based upon characters appearing in "Batman" and "Detective" comics magazines created by)
Reviews

Photos

Edit

Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
Adam West ... Batman
Burt Ward ... Robin
Alan Napier ... Alfred
Neil Hamilton ... Commissioner Gordon
Stafford Repp ... Chief O'Hara
Madge Blake ... Mrs. Cooper
Cesar Romero ... The Joker
Reginald Gardiner ... Bernie Park
Jody Gilbert ... Mrs. Putney
Diana Ivarson ... Baby Jane Towser
Owen McGiveney ... Charles
Gail Ommerle Gail Ommerle ... Browser
Edit

Storyline

The Joker persuades wealthy heiress Baby Jane Towser to join him in his artistic capers. Aided by his new accomplice, the Joker easily clears out a wing of the Gotham City Museum to make room for his latest "masterpiece" - pieces of a broken table. But the laughing criminal has plans for the priceless collection of paintings that once filled the room. Written by Twenty Penguins

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

23 March 1967 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound Recording)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Quotes

The Joker: [entering Wayne Manor with Baby Jane tied up] Where's Bruce Wayne?
Alfred Pennyworth: Mr. Wayne is not at home, sir.
The Joker: Too bad! I'll get my revenge later. Right now I'll settle for cash. Where's the safe?
Alfred Pennyworth: My duties do not include aiding and abetting thievery.
The Joker: [holds up a gun to Baby Jane's head] Oh, no?
Alfred Pennyworth: I see.
[closes the door]
Alfred Pennyworth: This way, sir.
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Certainly not the work of an ordinary mind
22 May 2016 | by kevinolzakSee all my reviews

"Flop Goes the Joker" starts off with Robin set to be sliced and diced, until Bruce Wayne manages to crawl underneath the huge contraption and stop it with his still bound body. Once Robin manages to worm himself loose and cut Wayne's bonds the pair confront The Joker (Cesar Romero) and his hostages, only for Baby Jane Towser (Diana Ivarson) to stand by him and refuse to press charges, but at least she's astute enough to comment on his artistic talent: "it's certainly not the work of an ordinary mind!" At the Towser mansion, Joker receives inspiration from the antique dining table, throwing cans of paint all over it and having his henchmen hack it to pieces, all in the name of art. His ultimate goal is to remove all of the art treasures from the gallery of Bernie Park (Reginald Gardiner) and replace them with worthless items, but Batman beats him to the punch, resulting in Joker's unwitting acquisition of a number of personal paintings done by Alfred the butler! Foiled yet again by the Caped Crusader, Joker grabs Baby Jane once more and makes his way over to Stately Wayne Manor for some quick cash, only to find surprising resistance from that pesky butler. No match for Alfred in the art of fencing, The Joker barges into the sacred study, discovers the secret switch inside the bust of Shakespeare, and proceeds to slide down the Batpole toward the Batcave. At this juncture, Batman arrives to find Alfred in complete control of the situation, sending the pale faced pirate up and down the pole, too frightened to realize how close he came to learning Bruce Wayne's dual identity. It's a comfort to know that, even with an obvious dive in quality as the series progressed, Cesar Romero and Burgess Meredith didn't suffer fools in their classic characterizations. This was the final performance of 83 year old Owen McGiveney, as the Towser butler (given no lines), his career arc similar to Burt Mustin in that he only began appearing on screen in the late 1940s.


1 of 1 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See one user review »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Action and Adventure Titles With Prime Video

Explore popular action and adventure titles available to stream with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed