Have Gun - Will Travel (1957–1963)
8.3/10
59
3 user

El Paso Stage 

Responding to a newspaper item, Paladin takes the overland stage to Bracketville to see a man named DeWitt about his supposedly unruly son. For his fee, he is to kidnap the boy and take him... See full summary »

Director:

Robert Butler

Writers:

Gene Roddenberry, Herb Meadow (created by) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
Richard Boone ... Paladin
Buddy Ebsen ... Marshal Elmo Crane
Karl Swenson ... Sam DeWitt (as Kari Swenson)
Jeremy Slate ... Frank DeWitt
Mary Munday Mary Munday ... Lena - Saloon Gal
Hank Patterson ... Judge Robbins
Wayne Tucker Wayne Tucker ... Croupier
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Storyline

Responding to a newspaper item, Paladin takes the overland stage to Bracketville to see a man named DeWitt about his supposedly unruly son. For his fee, he is to kidnap the boy and take him to another town, where some friends will sit on him until he cools down. He discovers that DeWitt's son is the new attorney who rode with him on the stage into town. When the son is killed, Paladin must shoot it out with the marshal or be killed himself. Written by DrDOS

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Genres:

Western

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

15 April 1961 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

CBS Television Network See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In the final shootout scene when both actors are seen together, they are on an inside stage. Each time Palladin speaks alone he is outside in Alabama Hills, Lone Pine, California. See more »

Goofs

At 21:14 when Sam Dewitt turns to Paladin to pay him with the money he's just taken out of his safe, the bullet hole is visible in the back of Sam's vest before he gets shot at 21:18. See more »

Quotes

Frank DeWitt: Justice discards party, friendship and kindred.
Paladin: Addison.
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User Reviews

 
There is a lot to Roddenberry's story line, some explicit, some not
20 March 2019 | by ebertipSee all my reviews

In the beginning scene on the El Paso stagecoach, actor Slate drones on about a legal issue to a not-interested female passenger. It relates to the superposition of an ethics clause onto a contract, an abstract issue which does relate to the rest of the story. Paladin is in the coach, seemingly disinterested (his hat is over his eyes), but he is listening, and he (correctly) cites the relevant case as McAdams v US (1853), which case likely was about 20 years old at the presumed time of the stage ride. (Whether the case is real, I do not know) However, the stage destination of Brackettville is a real place, quite famous for reasons not in the story. Brackettville developed because of the presence of nearby Ft. Clark, the base of the Buffalo Soldiers and had a significant population of Black Seminoles. In the time period 1958-59 (about two years before this Have Gun episode), the tv show Mackenzie's Raiders related to cavalry exploits out of Ft. Clark. The episode is notable for casting Buddy Ebsen (1926 graduate of Orlando High School) as a nasty villain. Marshall Elmo (Ebsen), who relied on his star to commit various bad acts, is finally (legally) tricked by Paladin. Or did the legality really matter, and was this simply about survival?


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