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"Star Trek" All Our Yesterdays (TV Episode 1969) Poster

(TV Series)

(1969)

Trivia

This is the only episode of TOS not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise.
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The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z". Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
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The name of the device, the Atavachron, is quite a descriptive one. "Atavus" is Latin for "... (an) ancestor or ancestral type from which a character is assumed to be inherited", and "chron" is Latin for time, so, in essence, an Atavachron is a device which can send you to an ancestral place, of any time period.
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The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
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Sulu, Uhura, and Chekov do not appear in this episode. Scotty does not appear on screen but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
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There were two highly successful sequel books, "Yesterday's Son" and "Time for Yesterday", both by A.C. Crispin.
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The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
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According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than Star Trek: Turnabout Intruder (1969). This is therefore the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.
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Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other women's navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley's character two navels in his pilot Genesis II (1973), stating that "the network owed me one."
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Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big trek fan has an album named Atavachron. One of the tracks is called All Our Yesterday's. The cover art features Alan in a Star Trek uniform.
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The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in Star Trek: What Are Little Girls Made Of? (1966).
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The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
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Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film Ice Station Zebra (1968), made the previous year.
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Scotty's voice is heard over a communicator, but he is never seen in this episode.
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The same wallpaper-like patterned artwork that was defiled in Star Trek: The Cloud Minders (1969) appears here on a smaller canvas hanging in the library behind Kirk when he twists Mr. Atoz's arm to find Spock and McCoy.
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The data storage disks would seem to anticipate DVD's. Another remarkably far-sighted piece of writing from the first version of Star Trek. Nothing like this was even talked about in the late 1960's.
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This episode takes place in 2269, the 17th Century and circa 2700 BC.
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The planet is called Sarpeidon. This is an alternate spelling for the name of "Sarpedon", the name of four different characters from Greek mythology. The first Sarpedon was a son of Zeus and Europa, and brother to the kings Minos and Rhadamanthys. He reportedly became the founding monarch of Lycia, in Asia Minor (Anatolia). The second Sarpedon was a son of Zeus and Laodamia, and a king of Lycia in his own right. He fought in the Trojan War, and was killed in combat by Patroclus. The third Sarpedon was a son of Zeus and Lardane, and a brother of Argus/Argos. The fourth Sarpedon was a son of Poseidon, and prince of a Thracian kingdom. He was killed in combat by his first cousin Heracles (Hercules).
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This is the penultimate episode of the original Star Trek series.
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At 72 years old, actor Ian Wolfe was almost twice William Shatner's age of 38, yet still acquitted himself remarkably well in their on-screen wrestling match, with Mr. Atoz trying to force Kirk through the time portal.
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