Yes, Prime Minister (1986–1987)
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The Key 

Sir Humphrey has to scramble when the Prime Minister's Political Advisor, Mrs. Wainwright, convinces the PM that she should get her old office back. Sir Humphrey and his predecessors have ... See full summary »

Director:

Sydney Lotterby

Writers:

Antony Jay (by), Jonathan Lynn (by)

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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
Paul Eddington ... James Hacker
Nigel Hawthorne ... Sir Humphrey Appleby
Derek Fowlds ... Bernard Woolley
Peter Cellier ... Sir Frank Gordon, Permanent Secretary of the Treasury
Deborah Norton ... Dorothy Wainwright
Victor Winding Victor Winding ... Policeman
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Storyline

Sir Humphrey has to scramble when the Prime Minister's Political Advisor, Mrs. Wainwright, convinces the PM that she should get her old office back. Sir Humphrey and his predecessors have been trying to get her moved for years but he may have met his match when she also suggests to the PM that he re-assign Sir Humphrey's responsibilities for promotions and appointments. When the PM orders Bernard to take away Sir Humphrey's key to the door connecting the Cabinet Office to 10 Downing Street, the Cabinet Secretary sees the light. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

political corruption | See All (1) »

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

30 January 1986 (UK) See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(DVD)

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Jim Hacker uses the phrase "Watch my lips" when trying to explain his point to Bernard. The first public use of this expression is usually credited to ex-President George Bush in his 1988 speech to the Republican National Convention, but this episode predates it by two years. See more »

Quotes

Jim Hacker: But me no buts, Bernard. Shakespeare.
Bernard Woolley: Oh no, Prime Minister. "But me no buts" is circa 1820. Mrs Centlivre used the phrase in 1708, but actually it was Scott's employment of it in 'The Antiquary' in 1816 which made it fashionable.
Jim Hacker: Shall we keep to the point please, Bernard?
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