6.3/10
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136 user 115 critic

The Last Mimzy (2007)

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Two siblings begin to develop special talents after they find a mysterious box of toys. Soon the kids, their parents, and even their teacher are drawn into a strange new world and find a task ahead of them that is far more important than any of them could imagine!

Director:

Robert Shaye (as Bob Shaye)

Writers:

Bruce Joel Rubin (screenplay), Toby Emmerich (screenplay) | 4 more credits »
7 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Chris O'Neil ... Noah Wilder
Rhiannon Leigh Wryn ... Emma Wilder
Joely Richardson ... Jo Wilder
Timothy Hutton ... David Wilder
Rainn Wilson ... Larry White
Kathryn Hahn ... Naomi Schwartz
Michael Clarke Duncan ... Nathanial Broadman
Kirsten Alter ... Sheila Broadman (as Kirsten Williamson)
Irene Snow Irene Snow ... Teacher in Meadow
Marc Musso ... Harry
Nicole Muñoz ... Kid with Braces
Scott E. Miller ... School Guard (as Scott Miller)
Megan McKinnon ... Wendy
Randi Lynne ... Julie the Babysitter
Tom Heaton ... Future Scientist
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Storyline

The siblings Noah and Emma travel with their mother Jo from Seattle to the family cottage in Whidbey Island to spend a couple of days while their workaholic father David Wilder is working. They find a box of toys from the future in the water and bring it home, and Emma finds a stuffed rabbit called Mimzy, and stones and a weird object, but they hide their findings from their parents. Mimzy talks telepathically to Emma and the siblings develop special abilities, increasing their intelligences to the level of genius. Their father becomes very proud when Noah presents a magnificent design in the fair of science and technology, and his teacher Larry White and his mystic wife Naomi Schwartz become interested in the boy when he draws a mandala. When Noah accidentally assembles the objects and activates a powerful generator creating a blackout in the state, the FBI arrests the family trying to disclose the mystery. But Emma unravels the importance to send Mimzy back to the future. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The future is trying to tell us something. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Family | Sci-Fi

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for some thematic elements, mild peril and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Spanish

Release Date:

23 March 2007 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Mimzy See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$10,024,819, 25 March 2007

Gross USA:

$21,471,047

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$27,297,450
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(HBO Print) |

Sound Mix:

SDDS | Dolby Digital | DTS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The theme song to the movie, "Hello (I Love You)" (not to be confused with the similarly-titled classic song by The Doors) is a rare one-off song by former Pink Floyd frontman Roger Waters, whose songs are usually part of concept albums. Waters worked with composer Howard Shore, so that the song's melody is a leitmotif in the film, as well as dovetailing well with the rest of the film's score. Waters commented, "I think together we've come up with a song that captures the themes of the movie - the clash between humanity's best and worst instincts, and how a child's innocence can win the day." Incidentally, the film touches on themes that Waters' album 'Amused to Death' was concerned with, while the song's lyrics reference Waters' Pink Floyd works 'Dark Side of the Moon' and 'The Wall', as well as Waters' solo album 'Radio KAOS'. See more »

Goofs

Early in the movie, the science teacher Larry White (Rainn Wilson) tells his class "of the doctors Watson and Crick who cracked the genetic code". This is wrong in two ways. First, while Watson and Crick's discovery of the double-helical structure of DNA helped explain how genes were replicated during cellular or viral reproduction, it was Marshall Nirenberg and Har Gobind Khorana who did the research that correctly interpreted the genetic code, for which they received the 1968 Nobel Prize in Physiology and/or Medicine (along with Robert W. Holley for his work on transfer RNA). Second, it is odd that Mr White refers to Watson and Crick as "doctors", which his class would understand to mean that they were medical men, which neither was; in fact while Watson had his PhD at the time of their seminal research, Crick had yet to complete his and held only a BSc - in physics. See more »

Quotes

Emma Wilder: How did you do that Noah?
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Soundtracks

Hello (I Love You)
Performed by Roger Waters
Written by Roger Waters and Howard Shore
Produced by Roger Waters, James Guthrie and Howard Shore
Roger Waters appears courtesy of Columbia Records
Special vocal appearance by Rhiannon Leigh Wryn
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
imaginative entertainment with some trippy images and a very good, ET-style heart
25 March 2007 | by Quinoa1984See all my reviews

The Last Mimzy doesn't pander needlessly to its core audience, but at the same time it also has a good accomplishment in that it also has an appeal to adults, or at least those that have passed that age of adolescence and look back on childhood with levels of nostalgia and relief that it's over. It delights as well as gives special meaning to putting a level of belief in what is unknown at a time when the rest of the world relies on hard facts and rigid control of personality. It also puts ET to a certain test: can the little creature from another world that needs to get home kind of story hold up to quasi (actually precise) psychedelia? Pink Floyd shirts and Roger Waters aside, this may even have a secret appeal to stoners just as much as your little boy or girl at the movie theater, who will obviously see it in a different life, that of light, efficient irreverence and lots of neat special effects.

'Mimzy' tells the story of a boy and a girl, Noah and Emma, both at least under the age of 10 but old enough to be articulate enough as well as appropriately secretive in the fantasy they hold paramount, who come upon a strange rock from the ocean. In it lies a bunch of fragments, and, oddly enough, a stuffed, fluffy, cute bunny named Mimzy, who Emma takes as her most important possession. Noah meanwhile becomes transfixed with the new powers that soon come to him via these rocks: he can hear the smallest insect, and is transfixed by obscure designs. This strikes up the attention of his parents as well as his science teacher (Rainn Wilson), who also knows of the symbols Noah makes up. But after a power outage- it also happens to be a generator that Noah conjures- gets the attention of the government, not sure what exactly is going on. Emma has a problem, however, in that Mimzy, her closest confidant and "teacher" is dying and needs to get back home. That's the basic story, anyway, as there are little ins and outs as the story goes on, including a great product placement for Sprite, and a montage-free example of each child's new abilities.

Some of this may be a little preposterous, even goofy, but Bob Shaye and his team bypass the obvious but still perilous pit-falls for filmmakers investing themselves into children's movies. No truly stupid gags, nothing with bodily excretions, none of that really, and if anything the humor, of a little wild and over-the-top in variety (some of which I was laughing at alone while the other kids were silent), is innocent and sort of knowing of the split of imagination between children and adults. The two kids are also very good at playing their parts, with Wryn as Emma very adept at being vulnerable and smart, and O'Neil being almost too close to looking like the boy Elliot in ET, however not without his own strengths. Shaye sometimes lets his control slip in just simple things like cinematography or making a fitting enough ending (too many futuristic hippies me thinks), and the goofiness does teeter on becoming a little too much. But I responded more to how the power of taking a long repeated idea, of kids becoming changed by outside forces in a very real world, and there being a sort of little twist to it all. It's not just about making friends and gaining in some alien intelligence, but in figuring the significance of the future, however weird it might be. It's definitely the finest children's movie, non-animated, to come out so far in 2007. 7.5/10


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