A Summer in Genoa (2008) - News Poster

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Interview: Colin Firth on The Railway Man

Colin Firth has done well in previous years to break out of the shadows of his costume drama past with roles in Genova, a stunning turn in A Single Man and, of course, the award magnet that was King George VI in The King’s Speech.

What the previous films have done is allow the actor space to find new ground and craft some unforgettable characters, and in Eric Lomax there is a strong foundation for Firth and director Jonathan Teplitzky to create an extraordinary performance.

Yesterday we posted our interview with Jeremy Irvine, who plays the younger Eric Lomax, you can see that interview here and read our review of the film here.

Our friend James Kleinmann sat down with the actor to talk about the film, what drew him to it and why he felt the story needed to be told.

The post Interview: Colin Firth on The Railway Man
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Iron Man 3 smashes his way to the top at the UK box office

More like an Avengers Assemble sequel than a tired third instalment, the reinvigorated action hero powers in at No 1

The winner

As Disney prepared Iron Man 3 for release, the question was always: would it perform like the first two instalments in the Tony Stark series, or could it fly close to the astonishing success of The Avengers last summer? Iron Man opened in May 2008 with £5.47m including £667,000 in previews. Iron Man 2 followed two years later with £7.66m including previews of £877,000, an increase of 40%. Then April 2012 saw The Avengers soar away with £15.78m, including £2.55m in previews – more than double the Iron Man 2 debut.

With £13.71m including £2.32m in previews, Iron Man 3 is 79% up on the opening of Iron Man 2 and just 13% down on the equivalent number for Avengers. In other words, the film has performed more like a sequel to Avengers than to the Iron Man movies.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Blu-ray Review: Luis Buñuel’s ‘Tristana’ Gets Exemplary Restoration

Chicago – At the dark heart of Luis Buñuel’s Oscar-nominated 1970 classic, “Tristana,” is a character so spectacularly hypocritical and richly fascinating that he upstages everyone including the titular heroine. As played by the great Fernando Rey, ignoble nobleman Don Lope is a self-professed libertine bound by traditional values. He passionately believes in the virtues of freedom, but only on his terms.

Lope may insist that his beloved Tristana (Catherine Deneuve, never lovelier nor icier) is free to leave his murky mansion whenever she pleases, but she knows all too well that’s not the case. After taking on the role of the parentless 19-year-old’s guardian, Lope quickly falls for the wide-eyed woman, alternately treating her as his daughter and wife. Rey is both comically ludicrous and deeply pitiful as he attempts to claim the heart of a woman who can’t stand the sight of him.

Blu-ray Rating: 4.5/5.0

Taken out of its historical context,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Rewind TV: The Hour; Everyday; The Killing; Falcón – review

Stellar performances continue to outweigh flimsy storytelling in BBC drama The Hour, while the final series of The Killing looks like a return to form

The Hour (BBC2) | iPlayer

Everyday (C4) | 4oD

The Killing (BBC4) | iPlayer

Falcón (Sky Atlantic)

A BBC current affairs programme is caught up in a crisis. There are internal machinations, a star presenter gone off-message, an editor undermined from above, government pressure and a gathering scandal involving establishment figures and sexual abuse; if it were not for the 1950s costumes, The Hour could almost be mistaken for a behind-the-scenes look at Newsnight in 2012.

With so much of the BBC's news coverage devoted to the meltdown at the BBC, it's a kind of relief to be transported back to a time before Twitter, before Jimmy Savile and before the Beeb became a self‑consuming behemoth.

The problem with The Hour is that, far from being unmanageably large,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Rewind TV: The Hour; Everyday; The Killing; Falcón – review

Stellar performances continue to outweigh flimsy storytelling in BBC drama The Hour, while the final series of The Killing looks like a return to form

The Hour (BBC2) | iPlayer

Everyday (C4) | 4oD

The Killing (BBC4) | iPlayer

Falcón (Sky Atlantic)

A BBC current affairs programme is caught up in a crisis. There are internal machinations, a star presenter gone off-message, an editor undermined from above, government pressure and a gathering scandal involving establishment figures and sexual abuse; if it were not for the 1950s costumes, The Hour could almost be mistaken for a behind-the-scenes look at Newsnight in 2012.

With so much of the BBC's news coverage devoted to the meltdown at the BBC, it's a kind of relief to be transported back to a time before Twitter, before Jimmy Savile and before the Beeb became a self‑consuming behemoth.

The problem with The Hour is that, far from being unmanageably large,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

New Release: The Trip DVD

Release Date: Oct. 11, 2011

Price: DVD $24.98

Studio: IFC/Mpi

Rob Brydon (l.) and Steve Coogan feast—and kvetch--in The Trip.

Best friends Steve Coogan (The Other Guys) and Rob Brydon (TV’s Little Britain) are the travelers who embark on The Trip, a 2010 comedy film that plays as one part documentary and one part fiction.

When a newspaper offers Coogan the chance to review a series of fine restaurants in the English countryside, he thinks it will make for a lovely getaway with his girlfriend. When she backs out, Brydon—Coogan’s dear buddy and a source of eternal aggravation—fills in as a less-than-ideal travel companion.

Directed by Michael Winterbottom (A Summer in Genoa), The Trip uses largely improvised dialogue from Coogan and Brydon (who co-starred in Winterbottom’s similar reality/fiction mash-up, 2005′s Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story). The two can’t help but try to outdo
See full article at Disc Dish »

Letter from Toronto: Michael Winterbottom Takes Hardy to India with Trishna (and More)

Letter from Toronto: Michael Winterbottom Takes Hardy to India with Trishna (and More)
Michael Winterbottom makes so many movies that some of them creep into festivals very quietly and, just as quietly, creep out, never to be seen again. That wasn't the case with The Trip, which played here last year, a woolly exploration of middle-aged angst that featured Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon (as themselves) bickering and trading Sean Connery impersonations as they made their way through the English countryside. But two years before that, in 2008, Winterbottom brought a picture called Genova to the festival, a mildly engaging drama in which Colin Firth plays a father who moves his family to Italy after the death of their mother. The picture never got a U.S. release, fading like the worn face of a stone saint on a medieval church.
See full article at Movieline »

First Look At Freida Pinto In Michael Winterbottom's 'Trishna'

If there is one thing you that you can guarantee from Michael Winterbottom, it's that you can never predict where he will go next. His last few efforts have seen him move from the romantic drama "Genova" to the grim genre piece "The Killer Inside Me" to the delightful low-key character comedy "The Trip." So what's next? Again, something completely different, this time an adaptation of Thomas Hardy's novel, "Tess of the d'Urbervilles." Titled "Trisha," Winterbottom has relocated the story to contemporary India, telling the story of the tragic relationship between Jay and Trishna, the former the son of a…
See full article at The Playlist »

Best and worst of Britain's subsidised film-makers revealed

Man on Wire's James Marsh among just three film-makers to repay lottery funding in full since 2006, according to recent report

Who is Britain's most commercially successful film-maker of the past five years – at least among those backed by lottery money from the UK Film Council? Take a bow, James Marsh. His Oscar-winning documentary Man on Wire repaid 100% of its UKFC investment, and his chimpanzee documentary Project Nim is set to follow suit.

According to figures published quietly in Hansard last week by culture minister Ed Vaizey, only two other films since 2006 – St Trinian's and The King's Speech – have so far returned their lottery cash in full. Streetdance 3D is also expected to do so.

And who must own up to being the least successful of Britain's lottery-subsidised film-makers? According to the figures, that unwanted honour goes to Stephen Frears. Two of his recent films have received some £1.7m
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

David Thomson: Catherine Keener

Catherine Keener has been a supporting actor for years, with a reputation for being interesting in valuable, offbeat pictures

Catherine Keener is a beloved figure among the several million who are always hoping for the best from American independent pictures. She promises feeling, humour and a sense of life as it is really lived, plus a nice acidity. Keener has been attractive without threatening outright beauty or glamour. Her persona springs from ironic intelligence and that's what any wise man or woman should be searching for in life. The trouble is that in America, women actors are often supposed to be knockouts who dominate their pictures just by virtue of standing there and letting themselves be photographed.

So Keener has been a supporting actor for more than 25 years, with a reputation for being different and interesting in valuable, offbeat pictures. Indeed, she has often been taken as a talisman and even a guarantee.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Film Review: ‘The Trip’ Hilariously Reunites Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon

Chicago – There are few things more cinematically depressing than a funny comic trapped in an unfunny movie. Think Larry David in “Whatever Works.” Scene to scene, his eyes repeatedly indicate that there’s a funnier punchline residing in his mischievous skull than there is in the lifeless script. You know a picture’s in trouble when you find yourself yearning to watch the actor eat lunch rather than finish the godforsaken movie.

Rating: 3.5/5.0

The supposed masterstroke in Michael Winterbottom’s new comedy, “The Trip,” is that it consists of nothing more than two very funny men eating lunch. And dinner. And driving in the car to the next restaurant. There isn’t a conventional plot (or script) to get in the way of the performers’ improvisational genius. In the opening moments of the film, the actors are heard riffing over the phone, sliding into the personas they mastered together in Winterbottom’s 2005 comic gem,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

[DVD Review] Summer in Genoa

Summer in Genoa is one of those deserving-of-an-audience movies that goes unnoticed because there isn’t any blood or guts, or grand statements about life, or ostentatious love affairs played out by big-name stars. What this movie is offering instead is an honest look at a family struggling with the death of a loved one. In the film, Joe, played by a passive and soft-spoken Colin Firth, decides to take a teaching job in Italy. And by going there with his two daughters, he tries to escape the grief that still lingers six months after the car accident that killed his wife.

In Genoa, where they’ve moved to and where the dark narrow alleyways are as complex as their rattled psyches, Kelly (played by The Oc’s Willa Holland) is in the midst of a sexual awakening; her younger sister Mary, who blames herself for the death of their mother,
See full article at JustPressPlay »

The Lost Michael Winterbottom/Colin Firth Film and More New DVDs

  • IFC
A look at what's new on DVD this week:

"A Summer in Genoa"

Directed by Michael Winterbottom

Released by Entertainment One

Of the many films Michael Winterbottom ("A Mighty Heart," "9 Songs") has directed in recent years, you wouldn't guess the one starring recent Oscar winner Colin Firth as a father who must take care of his two daughters in the wake of a car accident involving their mother (Hope Davis) would be the one to have trouble making it to the U.S. But here we are three years after "Genova," as it's known in much of the rest of the world, was shot and it's finally arrived on DVD, a mix of supernatural thriller and human drama that's actually getting reasonably good reviews upon its delayed release. Catherine Keener co-stars.

"Belladonna"

Directed by Annika Glac

Released by Osiris

Glac's debut as a writer/director centers on a man whose
See full article at IFC »

New this Week: ‘Scream 4,’ ‘Rio’ and ‘Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 1 (DVD)’

Hitting movie theaters this weekend:

The ConspiratorRobin Wright, James McAvoy, Tom Wilkinson

RioJesse Eisenberg, Anne Hathaway, George Lopez

Scream 4Neve Campbell, Courteney Cox, David Arquette

Movie of the Week

Scream 4

The Stars: Neve Campbell, Courteney Cox, David Arquette

The Plot: Ten years have passed, and Sidney (Campbell), who has put herself back together thanks in part to her writing, is visited again by the Ghostface Killer.

The Buzz: Wes Craven returns to the franchise that single-handedly rejuvenated the horror industry. Lots of pretty girls run around, most of them get killed, and repeat. But it’s all good fun (somehow). I enjoyed the first two films, but thought the third was pretty blah. I think enough time has passed though to make this a potentially smart beating of a dead horse.

Every Friday we’ll have new reviews of the latest films.

Tsr’s complete Film
See full article at Scorecard Review »

This Week In DVD: April 12th

Welcome to our weekly look at this week’s DVD releases of the week! Did I mention that this is a weekly column? It’s true. The titles coming to DVD this week run the gamut from documentaries to horror, and the only common thread is that they’re releases you probably haven’t heard of before. That is, with one fairly big exception. Harry Potter, one of the biggest franchises in cinema history, is coming to an end with a two part finale. Part one was a commercial and critical success, and part two promises to be even bigger when it hits screens later this year. It will be a sad day indeed for folks who enjoy watching teenage boys playing with their wands. Editor’s Note: Click on any of the titles or cover art below to find out more about the release at Amazon.com. A Summer In Genoa A car crash takes the
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

DVD Review: ‘A Summer in Genoa’ Finds Michael Winterbottom in Top Form

Chicago – At age 50, Michael Winterbottom is still one of the freshest talents on the block. His ability to reinvent himself is almost unparalleled at a time when many of the world’s most respected filmmakers go to the same well once too often. Granted, some of Winterbottom’s experiments pay off more than others, but when they succeed, they do so on a grand scale.

“A Summer in Genoa” is one of the best films Winterbottom has ever made. Americans audiences already seem to have forgotten the picture, which debuted to little fanfare in 2008 (a year after the director’s Angelina Jolie vehicle, “A Mighty Heart”). Since Winterbottom’s prolific work ethic parallels that of filmmakers half his age, he approached “Genoa” as yet another shoestring experiment, baring several stylistic similarities to the documentary realism in his 2004 effort, “9 Songs.”

DVD Rating: 5.0/5.0

Yet “Genoa” proves to be a riveting example of
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Trailer Park: Highlights from the 11th Annual Phoenix Film Festival, No One Knows About Persian Cats, A Summer In Genoa

  • Quick Stop
By Christopher Stipp

The Archives, Right Here

Check out my other column, This Week In Trailers, at SlashFilm.com and follow me on Twitter under the name: Stipp

Highlights from the 11th Annual Phoenix Film Festival and Int’l Horror and Sci-Fi Film Festival Part I By Ray Schillaci

The best of both worlds and a real treat for film lovers was the combining of two film festivals even though it proved to be a little confusing at times. But what they had to offer was a dynamite line up of talent that may be pegged as the best yet. In fact, there was so much offered I could not possibly see it all, hence breaking this review up. What I did see throughout both festivals was very ambitious or exciting talent that blew away audiences at the screenings.

This year Live Action Shorts was a huge buzz at the festival.
See full article at Quick Stop »

DVD Playhouse--April 2011

DVD Playhouse—April 2011

By

Allen Gardner

Hereafter (Warner Bros.) Clint Eastwood’s spiritual thriller follows a trio of characters whose seemingly disparate paths converge: Matt Damon as a blue collar Joe who tries to fight against his psychic powers that see “the other side,” Cecile de France as a journalist who somehow survives the tsunami that crushed Indonesia, and a London schoolboy (Frankie and George McLaren) who seeks answers after losing his twin brother. Like all of Eastwood’s films, the narrative construction is tight as a drum, with solid work by all involved. That said, “solid” would have to be the operative word to describe the proceedings here, as well as “unremarkable” and “uninvolving” on an emotional level. Perhaps we expect too much when we see Clint’s name on a film these days, but that’s the flip side of being one of the best. Blu-ray/DVD combo pack.
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

DVD Playhouse--April 2011

DVD Playhouse—April 2011

By

Allen Gardner

Hereafter (Warner Bros.) Clint Eastwood’s spiritual thriller follows a trio of characters whose seemingly disparate paths converge: Matt Damon as a blue collar Joe who tries to fight against his psychic powers that see “the other side,” Cecile de France as a journalist who somehow survives the tsunami that crushed Indonesia, and a London schoolboy (Frankie and George McLaren) who seeks answers after losing his twin brother. Like all of Eastwood’s films, the narrative construction is tight as a drum, with solid work by all involved. That said, “solid” would have to be the operative word to describe the proceedings here, as well as “unremarkable” and “uninvolving” on an emotional level. Perhaps we expect too much when we see Clint’s name on a film these days, but that’s the flip side of being one of the best. Blu-ray/DVD combo pack.
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

BFI’s Truffaut Season: ‘Day For Night’

“This is essentially a story of human frailties and foibles — all wrapped up in a lovely package and scored by the great Georges Delerue”.

Day for Night (La Nuit Américaine)

Directed by François Truffaut

Written by François Truffaut

France, 1973

A clutch of in-jokes and a plethora of film references punctuate François Truffaut’s Day for Night, an insider’s view of movies and the people who make them. A decade earlier, Jean-Luc Godard directed Contempt/Le Mépris (1963), a dazzlingly shot but frustratingly opaque anti-love story, that’s also stuffed full of cinematic bric-a-brac. But while Godard gives you a semi-nude Brigitte Bardot, philosophical ramblings and (let’s be honest) a bit a of a headache, fellow New Wave auteur Truffaut just wants to enfold you in his warm and distinctly Gallic embrace.

Even if you suffer from subtitle phobia, or harbour a sneaking suspicion that the leading lights of the
See full article at SoundOnSight »
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