Armchair Theatre (1956–1974)
6.7/10
32
1 user 1 critic

Brown Skin Gal, Stay Home and Mind Bay-Bee 

In this sad world where words unspoken do more damage than words spoken too much, a woman and her lodger are destined to stay on separate paths.

Director:

Mike Vardy

Writer:

Robert Holles (by)
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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
Billie Whitelaw ... Ruth
Donal McCann ... Roger
Anna Cropper ... Olga
Ann Firbank ... Joanna
Mark Kingston ... Arthur
Cheryl Hall ... Waitress
John Saunders John Saunders ... TV Interviewer
Jim McManus Jim McManus ... Gould (as James McManus)
Bernadette Milnes Bernadette Milnes ... Barmaid
Alison Hughes Alison Hughes ... Girl
Brenda Cowling Brenda Cowling ... Mrs. Knowles
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Storyline

In this sad world where words unspoken do more damage than words spoken too much, a woman and her lodger are destined to stay on separate paths.

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Genres:

Drama

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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

7 September 1971 (UK) See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Thames Television See more »
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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

the awkwardness of closeness
24 January 2010 | by didi-5See all my reviews

Billie Whitelaw is Ruth, a divorcée who needs to take in a lodger to keep herself afloat - Donal McCann is Roger, an electrician from Ireland who needs a berth. Although there are others in the cast, the bulk of this 50 minute play is a two-hander between them. We feel more in the silences and dream sequences than in any words or looks they share.

'Brown Skin Gal ...' is successful because it presents these people as so real. Roger, shy and sensitive, just can't get close to Ruth although he longs to - and she is much the same. There is a sense of hopelessness about the whole thing, but something quite pleasant too. Whitelaw and McCann play their parts to perfection without making their characters silly or cloying. However, their co-stars don't really make an impact; I only really noticed Ann Firbank because I had recently seen her in other dramas from the same decade.


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