The Blues (2003)
7.1/10
98
3 user 4 critic

Godfathers and Sons 

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Cast

Episode credited cast:
Ahmir Ahmir ... Himself
Mike Bloomfield ... Himself (archive footage)
Paul Butterfield Paul Butterfield ... Himself (archive footage)
Jamar Chess Jamar Chess ... Himself, Marshall Chess's son
Marshall Chess Marshall Chess ... Himself
Phil Chess Phil Chess ... Himself, co-founder of Chess Records
Chuck D ... Himself
Common ... Himself
Bo Diddley ... Himself (archive footage)
Willie Dixon Willie Dixon ... Himself (archive footage)
Mick Jagger ... Himself (archive footage)
Morris Jennings Morris Jennings ... Himself, Electric Mud drummer
Bob Koester Bob Koester ... Himself, owner, Delmark Records
Sam Lay Sam Lay ... Himself
Brownie McGhee Brownie McGhee ... Himself (archive footage)
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Genres:

Documentary | Music

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Details

Official Sites:

PBS [United States]

Country:

Germany | UK

Release Date:

2 October 2003 (USA) See more »

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Soundtracks

I Got What It Takes
Written by Willie Dixon
Performed by KoKo Taylor
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User Reviews

 
Great performances, fair documentary
23 March 2012 | by runamokprodsSee all my reviews

Some amazing performances (or more accurately frustrating pieces of performances) by Koko Taylor, Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf and many others that were/are key part of the legendary Chicago blues scene make this worth seeing for any electric blues fan.

But it's an uneven film. Spending so much time on the Chess family and their record label, especially with an unquestioning air of glorification feels a bit awkward and repetitive. I'm glad I saw it, but I would rather of seen a lot more of the performers, and a lot less of Marshall Chess talking himself up.

Or I would have been happy to see a much more incisive, objective look at the double edged ways white record labels both helped and exploited their artists. But this ends up in no man's land, leaving me unsure of it's point, or point of view.

None-the-less, a can't miss for the fan, for the performances themselves.


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