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Netflix Acquires ‘Atlantics’ and ‘I Lost My Body’ Following Cannes

Netflix acquired the worldwide rights to two films that played at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, Mati Diop’s “Atlantics,” which played in competition, and Jérémy Clapin’s animated film “I Lost My Body,” which won the top prize from the Cannes Critics’ Week sidebar of the festival, the streamer announced Saturday.

For “Atlantics,” Netflix acquired worldwide rights excluding China, Benelux, Switzerland, Russia and France, but it has subscription video on demand (SVoD) rights for 36 months following its theatrical release in France, Benelux and Switzerland. For “I Lost My Body, Netflix acquired worldwide excluding China, Benelux, Turkey and France, but also has SVoD rights for 36 months following its theatrical in France, an individual with knowledge told TheWrap.

Diop’s “Atlantics” played in competition and, on Saturday, was awarded the Grand Prix prize from the jury led by Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu. Diop made her feature directorial debut on the film
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Atlantics’ Review: Mati Diop’s Dazzling Ghost Story About the Refugee Crisis — Cannes

‘Atlantics’ Review: Mati Diop’s Dazzling Ghost Story About the Refugee Crisis — Cannes
Several recent movies have explored the refugee crisis as a deadly proposition, from the documentary “Fire at Sea” to “Mediterranean,” both of which focus on dramatic attempts to cross the ocean on rickety boats. The striking distinction of Mati Diop’s “Atlantics” is the way it magnifies the experiences of those left behind. Diop’s gorgeous, mesmerizing feature directorial debut focuses on the experiences of a young woman named Ada (Mama Sané) stuck in repressive circumstances on the coast of Dakar after her boyfriend vanishes en route to Spain. But it’s less fixated on his departure with other locals than its impact on Ada, and the community around her, as it contends with the eerie specter of the boys who went away.

An actress and filmmaker whose experimental shorts touch on similar themes, Diop’s first feature doesn’t always fit together from a narrative perspective, but it musters
See full article at Indiewire »

Meet the First Black Woman in the Cannes Competition Lineup: Mati Diop

Meet the First Black Woman in the Cannes Competition Lineup: Mati Diop
Mati Diop, niece of the late, great Senegalese cinema pioneer Djibril Diop Mambéty — director of African cinema classics “Touki Bouki” and “Hyènes” — makes her feature film directorial debut with “Atlantiques,” which will world premiere at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival. She is the first black woman with a film in the 72-year-old festival’s Competition section, and stands to be one of the biggest breakouts at Cannes this year.

Previously titled “Fire Next Time” (although not based on James Baldwin’s famous essay collection of the same name), the film is in rare company. Currently, Diop and Malian filmmaker Ladj Ly are the only filmmakers of African descent represented in competition at Cannes this year.

Diop is the daughter of Senegalese jazz musician Wasis Diop, but cinephiles will likely be more familiar with her filmmaker uncle. She first received attention from international critics and cinema enthusiasts for her work as an
See full article at Indiewire »

High Life Trailer: Robert Pattinson Is a Single Dad in Space

High Life Trailer: Robert Pattinson Is a Single Dad in Space
A24 has unveiled the first trailer for High Life. Robert Pattinson may have started out his career as the dude from Twilight, but he's since gone on to become a truly terrific actor in his own right who is constantly making interesting choices that seem to be motivated creatively, as opposed to for financial gain. In this case, he's taking part in a sci-fi/thriller that sees him raising a daughter all alone in space in a less than ideal and very tense situation.

We start off with some footage of Robert Pattinson raising his baby daughter in what looks like a rather normal day to day fatherly scenario, save for the fact that he's doing so in space. It's mostly atmospheric, with strange and alluring shots of unwitting astronauts aboard this vessel, seemingly at odds with one another. As things progress, the tension rises and something is clearly not as it should be.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Top 150 Most Anticipated Foreign Films of 2019: #90. Fire Next Time (La Prochaine fois le feu) – Mati Diop

Fire Next Time (La Prochaine fois le feu)

The highest ranking directorial debut on our countup, actress Mati Diop moves behind the camera in her long-gestating project, The Fire Next Time (which is not an adaptation of the famous James Baldwin novel), a title she has been working on since 2012. The film is produced by Judith Lou Lévy and Eve Robin of Les Films du Bal and co-produced by Arte France Cinema, Senegal’s Cinekap, and Belgium’s Frakas Productions. Known for her debut in Claire Denis’ exceptional 2008 film 35 Shots of Rum, as well as co-starring alongside Brady Corbet in the morbid Antonio Campos film Simon Killer (we interviewed her in Park City), she’s also racked up credits with Matias Pineiro and Benjamin Crotty.…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Claire Denis: Physical Detail, Fierce Politics, Bracing Formalism

  • Variety
Claire Denis: Physical Detail, Fierce Politics, Bracing Formalism
In the ranks of international arthouse auteurs, the status of Claire Denis is curiously ambiguous: depending on which lens you look through, she’s either among the most venerated or the most undervalued filmmakers working today. Ask the critical community, and you’ll leave very much with the former impression. Many writers, this one included, will heap her with lofty superlatives, “greatest working filmmaker” among them; in the last edition of Sight & Sound magazine’s famous decennial critics’ poll of the greatest films of all time, her hypnotic 1998 masterwork “Beau Travail” was one of just four films from the last 20 years to place in the top 100.

And yet, 30 years and 13 features into a career at once dauntingly consistent and thrillingly unpredictable, the diminutive 72-year-old Frenchwoman is held in curiously circumspect regard by her own industry. She has never won an award at Cannes, Venice or Berlin, with a Locarno Golden
See full article at Variety »

Tiff Review: ‘High Life’ is an Astounding Sensorial and Emotional Achievement in Sci-Fi Filmmaking

While High Life has understandably drawn all kinds of comparisons to the 60s and 70s cerebral sci-fi canon (notably Solaris and 2001: A Space Odyssey), for both its abstract use of space imagery and its minimalist ship design which more often than not resembles an artificially-lit hospital filled with dated technology, its soul is firmly in the sensibilities of its filmmaker, French master Claire Denis, who mines the genre for a deeply sensorial and moving portrait of the misery and horror parents are willing and perhaps responsible to endure so their children might not have to.

Denis herself has spoken frequently about her relationship with her father, who raised her in a French colonized West Africa and whose role in a machine of violence and oppression beyond her comprehension at that age has severely informed both her politics and artistry. She’s frequently wrestled with horrors of colonialism in narrative and form,
See full article at The Film Stage »

“My Best Tool is Empathy”: Four Female Cinematographers on “The Female Gaze”

“I think women drill down and they’re not afraid of emotion,” says cinematographer Joan Churchill about females working behind the camera in film. Joined by other lauded DPs Ashley Connor (The Miseducation of Cameron Post), Agnès Godard (35 Shots of Rum) and Natasha Braier (Neon Demon) on a panel as part of the Film Society of Lincoln Center’s The Female Gaze series, the women discussed the breadth of their work. Running currently through August 9th at the Walter Reade Theater in New York City, the series shines light on incredible cinematographers throughout the decades, all of whom are women. Some […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

“My Best Tool is Empathy”: Four Female Cinematographers on “The Female Gaze”

“I think women drill down and they’re not afraid of emotion,” says cinematographer Joan Churchill about females working behind the camera in film. Joined by other lauded DPs Ashley Connor (The Miseducation of Cameron Post), Agnès Godard (35 Shots of Rum) and Natasha Braier (Neon Demon) on a panel as part of the Film Society of Lincoln Center’s The Female Gaze series, the women discussed the breadth of their work. Running currently through August 9th at the Walter Reade Theater in New York City, the series shines light on incredible cinematographers throughout the decades, all of whom are women. Some […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

The Best Cinematographers of the 21st Century, From Roger Deakins to Ellen Kuras

  • Indiewire
The Best Cinematographers of the 21st Century, From Roger Deakins to Ellen Kuras
The cinematography of an individual movie is oftentimes a difficult thing to judge, not only because it can be tough to separate the work of the cinematographer from the overall visual storytelling, but also because most viewers react to the look and style of a film through the lens of how we felt about the movie itself. Looking at a cinematographer’s body of work, however, can be a very different exercise, as it reveals what aesthetic aspects are specific to the cinematographer and how they impact the storytelling of the films they’ve shot.

When doing these lists, there is always a nagging feeling that we might be under-representing the great international filmmakers from around the world simply based on our own U.S.-centric viewing habits. The interesting thing about modern cinematography, though, is so many of great talents from around the world eventually feel the pull of
See full article at Indiewire »

Rights RoundUP Toronto, Pusan and other Fall Festivals

Toronto International Film Festival acquisitions this year were sparse which was no surprise given the recent closings of the well funded specialty arms of the studios. The noticeable slowdown in the business at these large festival cum market events (e.g., Toronto) has continued since Cannes although Locarno was happily surprised at the increased number of acquisitions which took place there albeit by international sales agents rather than by distributors. At least it attests to some enthusiasm in what seems to be a lackluster low energy year for the film business. Venice[/link] also created some sales in spite of its never quite becoming the market it might be. Pusan was disappointing leaving buyers and sellers looking toward the upcoming Tokyo International Film Festival and AFM as the place where deals will close. The European sales agents did better selling to the Asian distributors than the Asian sales agents. Bavaria sold 'Into the Great Silence' to Jin Jin of South Korea. Celsius sold 'Vivaldi' to Mirovision for South Korea, and new international sales agent M-Appeal's Maren Kroymann sold 'Trick' to Coral for South Korea.

This is a sample of the Rights Roundup Reports available from sales-filmfinders@imdb.com. For more information on acquisitions in the future you can purchase the Fall Festival and Market RightsRoundup and Rights Roundup Reports for AFM/ American Film Market, Berlin Film Festival and EFM/ European Film Market and Cannes Film Festival and Marche du Film after those events.

In Toronto, Fox Searchlight remained the strong buyer, picking up 'The Wrestler' for the highest sales figure of the market, but still less than $4,000,000 and ‘Slumdog Millionaire’, the other hit of the festival. Summit, an A list international sales agent who entered the domestic distribution business this year also acquired ‘Hurt Locker' for U.S.. Both 'The Wrestler' and 'Hurt Locker' were packaged, financed and represented by CAA and both were significant in that only U.S. rights were acquired (without Canada) at a good high price. IFC Films continued its acquisitions activities for IFC in Theaters, its day and date distribution platform making independent films available to a national audience in theaters and on demand simultaneously, buying ‘Flame & Citron’, ‘Fear Me Not’, ‘Everlasting Moments’ and ‘Che’. Sony Pictures Classics was also active acquiring distribution rights to ‘Every Little Step: The Journey of a Chorus Line’, ‘Faubourg 36’ (aka ‘Paris 36’). The micro distributors such as Strand, Kino, Zeitgeist, Panorama, etc. continued business as usual, which generally means hanging back until there are no obvious offers for a film and then coming in with a modest proposal.

Here are the international sales agents whose sales (licensing of distribution rights on behalf of the producers) have been reported thus far:

Bavaria Film International licensed ‘Krabat’ to SPI for Poland and Romania and to Film Depot for Russia ahead of the first public screening. Strong interest is also reported from Spain, France, Italy, Czech Republic, Hungary, Latin America, Japan and USA. ‘The Window’ (aka ‘La Ventana’) sold to Cinemien for Benelux, Imovison for Brazil. A deal with France is expected to close. ‘Cherry Blossoms’ went to Against Gravity for Poland. ‘Empty Nest’ has interest from U.S. as does ‘Restless’.

Celluloid Dreams has acquired all international sales rights to ‘Soul Power’ from Submarine Entertainment who was repping the film. There are offers in major territories soon to close. It also acquired ‘Youssou NDour: I Bring What I Love’ for world sales. Oscilloscope acquired it for U.S. ‘Birdwatchers’ sold to Artificial Eye for the U.K., Filmladen for Austria, Trigon for Switzerland, Pandora for Germany, Cinemien for Benelux, Hopscotch for Australia and New Zealand. ‘Mark Of An Angel’ has sold to Metrodome for the UK, Odeon for Greece, Seville for Canada, Xenix for Switzerland. Diaphana is about to gross $5m with its French theatrical release and Lumiere released in Belgium. ‘Achilles and the Tortoise’ sold to Odeon for France and Maywin for Russia.

Cinema Management Group has closed several territories on ‘The People Speak’ which screened 20 minutes in Toronto FF Special Screening. ‘Zambezia’, ‘Killer Bean Forever’ and ‘The People Speak’ went to Vision Film for Poland and to Film Pop for Turkey.

Elle Driver licensed ’35 Rhums’ to New Wave Films for the U.K.

Fandango Portobello licensed ‘Mid August Lunch' (aka'Pranzo di ferragosto’) to Le Pacte for France, Pandora for Germany, Cinemien for Benelux, Xenix for Switzerland, Filmladen for Austria.

Films Distribution licensed ‘Sea Wall’ to Axiom for the U.K.

Finecut licensed 'Daytime Drinking' to Japan's Eleven Arts who will release it in 30 North American cities. Fortissimo Films signed a six picture deal with Canadian distributor Maximum Films for ‘$9.99’, ‘Laila's Birthday’, ‘Country Wedding’, ‘Serbis’, ‘Native Dancer’, and ‘Tokyo Sonata’. ‘Disgrace’ also went to Maximum. ‘Every Little Step: The Journey of A Chorus Line’ went to Sony Pictures Classics for North America and Australia and New Zealand. ‘Serbis’ and 'Tokyo Sonata' went to Regent for North America.

Hanway Films licensed ‘Of Time and City’ to Strand Releasing for all U.S. rights. ‘Genova’ went to ThinkFilm for North America just before Toronto. Wanda acquired all rights for Spain.

Maximum licensed ‘Sugar‘ to Axiom for the U.K.

Momento licensed ‘Goodbye Solo’ to Imagine for Benelux, Axiom for the U.K. and Xenix for Switzerland. It also has offers from France, Portugal, Greece and Italy among others.

MK2 licensed ‘24 City’ to The Cinema Guild for U.S.

Pathe licensed ‘Slumdog Millionaire’ to Warner Bros. and Fox Searchlight for North America. ‘Faubourg 36’ (aka ‘Paris 36’) went to Sony Pictures Classics for U.S., Australasia, and Scandinavia just before Toronto.

Rai Trade licensed ‘Il Papa di Giovanna’ to Paradis for France, ABC for Benelux, Palace of Australia and New Zealand, MFD for Switzerland.

Roissy has licensed 'Seraphine' to Metrodome for U.K. and Ireland and to Rialto for Australia and New Zealand.

Sahamonkol licensed 'Chocolate' to Magnet for North America.

The Match Factory licensed ‘Flame & Citron’ to IFC Films for U.S. ‘Teza’ went to Trigon for Switzerland and Ripley’s Film for Italy.

TrustNordisk licensed ‘Fear Me Not’ and ‘Everlasting Moments’ and 'Heaven's Heart' to IFC Films for North America. Visit Films licensed five titles including ‘Hannah Takes The Stairs’, ‘LOL’, and ‘Kissing on The Mouth’, ‘Dance Party USA’ and ‘Quiet City’ to Beyond Entertainment for Australia/ New Zealand.

Voltage licensed ‘The Hurt Locker’ to Summit for U.S.

Wild Bunch licensed ‘Che’ to IFC Films. ‘Ponyo’ went to Lucky Red for Italy.

See also

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