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A down-on-his-luck former poker champ, forced to now work as a bookie's collector, shoots and kills a man who owes money, but the gun was supposed to be filled with blanks. Who is responsible for the incident, and why?

Director:

David Manson

Writers:

Dick Wolf (created by), Rene Balcer (developed by) (as René Balcer) | 4 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Vincent D'Onofrio ... Robert Goren
Kathryn Erbe ... Alexandra Eames
Eric Bogosian ... Danny Ross
Aaron Stanford ... Josh Snow
Aleksa Palladino ... Angela
Boris McGiver ... Lou Cardinale
Robert Leeshock ... Kip McGonagle
Harry O'Reilly ... Frankie Martin
Tobias Truvillion ... Deshawn Warner
Adam Mucci ... Hartley
Brenda Withers ... ADA Emma Niles
Carolyn Baeumler ... Helene McGonagle
Caris Vujcec ... Detective Louise Campesi
Eric L. Abrams Eric L. Abrams ... Security Officer (as Eric Lenox Abrams)
J.C. Montgomery ... Coach
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Storyline

A down-on-his-luck former poker champ, forced to now work as a bookie's collector, shoots and kills a man who owes money, but the gun was supposed to be filled with blanks. Who is responsible for the incident, and why?

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »
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Details

Official Sites:

USA Network - Episode guide

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

19 July 2009 (USA) See more »

Filming Locations:

New York City, New York, USA

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Permits are actually not required for antique rifles and pistols in New York City as long as they are either muzzle-loaders or they use "fixed cartridges" no longer commercially available and are meant for display only, like the Springfield percussion cap rifles Lou Cardinale has on display in his bar. Background checks are also not required for antique black-powder firearms and modern replicas of them. See more »

Goofs

Goren asks the ADA if they made a deal to charge Josh with third degree manslaughter or reckless endangerment but not murder. However there is no such criminal charge as third degree manslaughter in the state of New York. Manslaughter comes in two degrees, the most serious being manslaughter in the first degree (also known as voluntary manslaughter) which is charged when a person intentionally assaults another person and unintentionally causes their death. An example being a man starts a fight with someone in a bar and hits them over the head with a chair which causes their death. Manslaughter in the first degree is a class B felony with a minimum mandatory sentence of 5 years in prison and a maximum of 25 years. The other degree of manslaughter is manslaughter in the second degree (also known as involuntary manslaughter) which is charged when one person's actions show a reckless disregard for human life (actions that constitute reckless endangerment) and unintentionally causes the death of another person. An example being a teenage boy steals a car and leads police on a high speed chase, running red lights and stop signs and ignoring pedestrians in a crosswalk and hitting and killing one of them. Manslaughter in the second degree is a class C felony with a minimum mandatory sentence of 3 1/2 years in prison and a maximum sentence of 15 years. The only homicide related crime in New York state that is less severe than manslaughter in the second degree is criminally negligent homicide (it's possible this is what Goren is referring to although he should know it's not called third degree manslaughter), which is charged when a negligent action by one person unintentionally causes the death of another person. An example being a teenage girl is driving her car down the road and decides to respond to a text message without pulling over, because she is driving while distracted she goes off the street and crashes through a fence into someone's back yard hitting and killing a child playing in the yard. Criminally negligent homicide is a class E felony and can carry a minimum sentence of five years probation or a prison sentence of 1 1/2 to 4 years. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Should have been a discreet episode.
24 July 2009 | by awdudenoSee all my reviews

Was Lou Taylor Pucci too busy? This would have been a good tie-in/follow up episode to the one with Pucci has a card prodigy if they'd gotten him to play the part. Since it was someone else, much of the dialog was used to explain to people who this guy was supposed to be. Goren and Josh each made like three references to "the guy who killed my dad" and "his mentor and father figure" just to connect the episodes. It's not as bad as if they'd changed Nicole Wallaces in the middle, but it was kind of unnecessary to continue it. And Eames was particularly absent in this episode. No concerned-partner warnings about getting too involved with this kid again. Pretty much an over ambitious idea that fell short.


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