6.4/10
6,136
37 user 64 critic

The Infidel (2010)

TV-PG | | Comedy, Drama | 4 June 2010 (Ireland)
Trailer
2:02 | Trailer

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An identity crisis comedy centred on Mahmud Nasir, successful business owner, and salt of the earth East End Muslim who discovers that he's adopted - and Jewish.

Director:

Josh Appignanesi

Writer:

David Baddiel
1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Igal Naor ... Arshad El-Masri
Stewart Scudamore ... Tariq
Omid Djalili ... Mahmud Nasir
James Krishna Floyd ... Gary Page (as James Floyd)
Archie Panjabi ... Saamiya Nasir
Leah Fatania Leah Fatania ... Nabi Nasir
Stuart Antony Stuart Antony ... Drummer
Scott Walters Scott Walters ... Delivery Guy
Mina Anwar ... Muna
Amit Shah ... Rashid Nasir
Soraya Radford Soraya Radford ... Uzma
Ravin J. Ganatra Ravin J. Ganatra ... Fahad (as Ravin Ganatra)
Christian Lees ... Bar Mitzvah Twin Louis
Jonah Lees ... Bar Mitzah Twin Sammi
Richard Schiff ... Lenny Goldberg
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Storyline

Based in a London suburb Mahmud Nasir lives with his pretty wife, Saamiya, and two children, Rashid and Nabi. His son plans to marry Uzma, the step-daughter of Egyptian-born Arshad Al-Masri, a so-called 'Hate Cleric' from Waziristan, Pakistan. Mahmud, who is not exactly a devout Muslim, he drinks alcohol, and does not pray five times, but does agree that he will appease Arshad, without whose approval the marriage cannot take place. Shortly thereafter Mahmud, while going over his recently deceased mother's documents, will find out that he was adopted, his birth parents were Jewish, and his name is actually Solly Shimshillewitz. He conceals this information from his family, and with the help of his neighbor, Leonard Goldberg, tries to understand the Jews, their religion and even locates his birth-father, who is on his death-bed in a nursing home. Mahmud does not know that Arshad has been checking into his background, has videotaped him setting fire to a Jewish cap during a protest, and ... Written by rAjOo (gunwanti@hotmail.com)

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Is It a Muslim? Is It a Jew? No! It's...

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

4 June 2010 (Ireland) See more »

Also Known As:

Alles koscher! See more »

Filming Locations:

London, England, UK

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Box Office

Opening Weekend:

£135,448 (United Kingdom), 11 April 2010, Limited Release

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$4,500,000, 7 February 2012
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

David Baddiel: The movie's writer can be seen on the TV show The Wright Stuff (2000), which Mahmud watches. See more »

Goofs

After Mahmud sees that Lenny has parked his taxi cab on his parking cones, he begins to walk over to Lenny's house to confront him about it. On the way, he walks past a car and the camera crew is reflected in its side. See more »

Quotes

[Mahmud tells Lenny his real name]
Lenny Goldberg: Solly Shimshillewitz? Why didn't they just call you "Jewe-jew-jew-jew-jew" and be done with it?
See more »

Alternate Versions

Mahmud's road-rage scene from the outset has been sound-dubbed for strong language (UK video version), with the C-word being uttered only once. In the UK cinema print, Mahmud shouts the C-word many times towards the taxi driver. See more »

Connections

References Yentl (1983) See more »

Soundtracks

Hatikvah
  • the Israeli national anthem

[Music based on "La Mantovana" composed by Giuseppino del Biado aka Giuseppe Cenci]
See more »

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User Reviews

 
Good as a cultural exploration, at least
15 August 2010 | by featheredsunSee all my reviews

While I did laugh and smirk at this film a few times, it is far from the best comedy I've seen in movies. The interplay between the characters is often well written and there are really some inspired moments (the young daughter's jihaddist language was hilarious!) But the humor sometimes asks you to stretch your suspension of disbelief a little too much.

What I thought was really worthwhile in this film was the portrayal of some modern Muslims and their families and community. We see a tabloid-reading woman in a full burqah with a wonderful east-end/Scottish/cockney accent, an engaging imam who has a ready interpretation of how the modern faithful may deal with homosexuality, and the prevalent use of the internet as a means for modern Muslims to keep current and in-touch. This film deals with issues that are very very important and shows how everyday people respond to them in a very open way.

And I think comedy, if it's done properly, is really the best way to approach these issues in media. This movie does break down some barriers, by showing that, yes, we have some very definite cultural heritages that don't always get along, but we're all just people and we have to share this world for better or for worse.

I would definitely recommend this for any audience. Parents will want to know there is adult subject matter and a lot of adult language. The racist language is an integral part of the story and adds, rather than detracts from the work.

You don't have to be any certain faith to laugh or cry. The Infidel shows this.


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