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The Gersh Agency Signs Berlin Golden Bear Winner Nadav Lapid, Writer-Director Of ‘Synonyms’ & ‘The Kindergarten Teacher’

  • Deadline
Exclusive: The Gersh Agency has signed acclaimed Israeli writer-director Nadav Lapid, whose latest feature Synonyms (Synonymes) won Berlin’s Golden Bear for Best Film earlier this year.

Well-received French and Hebrew-language drama Synonyms, which had its North American premiere at Tiff last night, follows a young Israeli man who absconds to Paris to flee his nationality, aided by his trusty Franco-Israeli dictionary. The film has already played at a host of international festivals.

Pic is being released by Kino Lorber in the U.S. in late October and will also play the New York Film Festival.

Lapid is well known on the arthouse circuit for Israeli movies including Policeman, which won the Locarno Festival Special Jury Prize in 2011 and Cannes critical hit The Kindergarten Teacher, released by Kino Lorber and later remade in English with Maggie Gyllenhaal.

He ​was born in Tel Aviv, Israel, and studied philosophy at Tel Aviv University.
See full article at Deadline »

John Cena’s Got Jokes About This Yale Dean on Premiere of ‘Are You Smarter Than a 5th Grader’ (Exclusive Video)

  • The Wrap
John Cena’s Got Jokes About This Yale Dean on Premiere of ‘Are You Smarter Than a 5th Grader’ (Exclusive Video)
John Cena and Nickelodeon’s “Are You Smarter Than a 5th Grader” are back for a new season on Friday evening, but you won’t have to wait until 7 o’clock to get a few chuckles over an adult struggling with basic math.

Not only is Alfred the assistant dean at Yale, he is a former Princeton professor. Both are Ivy League schools.

Here is Nick’s enjoyable logline for the “College Dean” episode:

In the episode, an Ivy League professor aims to prove his years of schooling haven’t gone to waste. But when his big brain starts to overthink, he considers cheating off a 5th grader!

Also Read: Inside WWE's 'SmackDown' and 'Raw' Creative Team Shakeup (Exclusive)

Watch Alfred fret his way through a third-grad subtraction question via the sneak peek video above, which is exclusive to TheWrap.

And yes, he was correct. We hope your backwards counting concurs.
See full article at The Wrap »

U.S. Trailer for Nadav Lapid’s Riveting Golden Bear Winner ‘Synonyms’

Israeli writer-director Nadav Lapid made a splash with both his gripping debut Policeman and his follow-up The Kindergarten Teacher, but he earned his highest accolade yet with Synonyms, which picked up the Golden Bear at Berlinale. Telling the story of an Israeli man who moves to Paris and is caught adrift as he wrestles with identity, it’s a thoroughly riveting character study that consistently catches one off guard in evolving ways. Ahead of a U.S. release in October via Kino Lorber and stops at Tiff and Nyff, the new trailer has arrived.

Ed Frankl said in our review, “Relocation becomes dislocation in director Nadav Lapid’s intense, beguiling Synonyms. Winner of the Golden Bear at the Berlin Film Festival, the story follows a young Israeli man who moves to Paris in the hope of shedding his past and remolding his identity, yet instead finds his sense of self chipped away at.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Hypnotic First Trailer for Nadav Lapid’s ‘Synonyms’ Teases One of the Best Films of the Decade

Winner of the Golden Bear at this year’s Berlin International Film Festival — and a bonafide masterpiece that deserves to be mentioned alongside “Parasite,” “Portrait of a Lady on Fire,” “The Irishman,” and the rest of the major new releases this fall — Nadav Lapid’s “Synonyms” is destined to go down as one of the most thrilling, infuriating, and essential movies of 2019. And thanks to distributor Kino Lorber, American audiences won’t have to wait much longer to see it.

A sui generis work of tormented genius from the Israeli auteur behind “Policeman” and the original version of “The Kindergarten Teacher,” Lapid’s disorienting third feature is a strange and utterly singular tale about the violence of a man trying to replace one identity with another. That man, extrapolated from the director’s personal experience of fleeing to Paris because he believed that he was born in the Middle East by mistake,
See full article at Indiewire »

Kino Lorber Nabs North American Rights to Berlin Winner ‘Synonyms’

  • Variety
Kino Lorber Nabs North American Rights to Berlin Winner ‘Synonyms’
Kino Lorber has acquired North American rights to Nadav Lapid’s feature drama “Synonyms,” which had its world premiere at the 69th Berlin International Film Festival earlier this year and won the top prize Golden Bear for best film.

Synonyms,” co-produced by director Maren Ade (“Toni Erdmann”) amongst others, is loosely based on Lapid’s own experience as a young man who rejects his Israeli heritage and flees to Paris. It is Lapid’s third feature following his “Policeman” and “The Kindergarten Teacher.”

Synonyms” will have its theatrical premiere this fall and will be available on VOD and home video this winter.

Last year Kino Lorber also picked up rights for the Golden Bear winner, Adina Pintilie’s sexually intimate odyssey “Touch Me Not.” Kino Lorber also released Lapid’s “The Kindergarten Teacher” stateside, which saw an English-language remake in 2018 written and directed by Sara Colangelo which debuted at the
See full article at Variety »

Berlin Golden Bear Winner ‘Synonyms’ Headed To U.S. In Kino Lorber Deal

Berlin Golden Bear Winner ‘Synonyms’ Headed To U.S. In Kino Lorber Deal
For a second year in a row, Kino Lorber has inked a deal for Berlin’s Golden Bear winner. The indie distributor said Thursday it has acquired North American rights to Synonyms, Nadav Lapid’s drama that won Berlin’s top prize after it world premiered there in February. The pic will now get a U.S. theatrical release in the fall before hitting VOD and digital.

Synonyms is loosely based on Lapid’s own experience and stars Tom Mercier as Yoav, a young Israeli expat and ex-soldier who refuses to speak Hebrew and goes to Paris with nothing but his French-Hebrew dictionary and a backpack that eventually gets stolen. He develops a relationship with Emile and Caroline, a young bourgeois couple living below him, who aid him on his search for rebirth and a new identity. Lapid co-wrote the script with Haim Lapid.

Producers are Sbs ProductionsSaïd Ben Saïd and Michel Merkt.
See full article at Deadline »

Kino Lorber Acquires Berlinale Golden Bear Winner ‘Synonyms’

Kino Lorber Acquires Berlinale Golden Bear Winner ‘Synonyms’
Kino Lorber has acquired the North American rights to “Synonyms,” which won the Golden Bear for Best Film at this year’s Berlin International Film Festival, the distributor announced Thursday.

Nadav Lapid directed the feature loosely based on Lapid’s own experience as a young man who rejects his Israeli heritage and flees to Paris. This is Lapid’s third feature following his critically acclaimed “Policeman” and “The Kindergarten Teacher,” which Kino Lorber also released stateside.

Kino Lorber plans to release the film theatrically this fall, followed by a VOD and home video release this winter.

Also Read: 'Studio 54' Acquired by Kino Lorber, Zeitgeist Films

Synonyms” stars Tom Mercier as Yoav, a young Israeli expat and ex-soldier who refuses to speak Hebrew and goes to Paris with nothing but his French-Hebrew dictionary and a backpack that eventually gets stolen. He develops a relationship with Emile and Caroline,
See full article at The Wrap »

Kino Lorber acquires Berlin Golden Bear winner 'Synonyms' (exclusive)

Kino Lorber acquires Berlin Golden Bear winner 'Synonyms' (exclusive)
Company distributed Nadav Lapid’s previous films, Policeman and The Kindergarten Teacher.

Kino Lorber has acquired North American rights to this year’s Berlin Golden Bear winner Synonyms by Nadav Lapid and will distribute theatrically and on VOD in the winter.

Tom Mercier stars as a young former Israeli soldier who moves to France in a bid to start a new life and put his military life behind him. Refusing to speak Hebrew and armed only with a French-Hebrew dictionary, he befriends a young bourgeois couple in his search for redemption.

Toni Erdmann director Maren Ade served as co-producer on Synonyms,
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Kino Lorber acquires Berlin Golden Bear winner 'Synonyms' (exclusive)

Kino Lorber acquires Berlin Golden Bear winner 'Synonyms' (exclusive)
Company distributed Nadav Lapid’s previous films, Policeman and The Kindergarten Teacher.

Kino Lorber has acquired North American rights to this year’s Berlin Golden Bear winner Synonyms by Nadav Lapid and will distribute theatrically and on VOD in the winter.

Tom Mercier stars as a young former Israeli soldier who moves to France in a bid to start a new life and put his military life behind him. Refusing to speak Hebrew and armed only with a French-Hebrew dictionary, he befriends a young bourgeois couple in his search for redemption.

Toni Erdmann director Maren Ade served as co-producer on Synonyms,
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Unstable Ground: Nadav Lapid Discusses Golden Bear Winner "Synonyms"

  • MUBI
Tom Mercier in SynonymsNow that the 69th Berlin International Film Festival has concluded it is even easier to see that startlingly few films in the centerpiece competition were able to escape the doldrums of average, straightforward and unsurprising cinema. There was a chance, in the lead-up to the closing ceremony, that the awards would double down on an unforgivably mediocre selection, yet as the festival ended there was a blast of hope that symbolically bodes well for next year, the 70th edition, to be newly headed by Locarno Festival’s former Artistic Director, Carlo Chatrian. German director Angela Schanalec, whose last film The Dreamed Path was at Locarno in 2016, took home the prize for best director for one of the festival’s best films, I Was at Home, But..., in a remarkable gesture of support for an approach to filmmaking that is far away from commercial concerns. And the Golden Bear went to Synonyms,
See full article at MUBI »

Berlin Film Review: ‘Synonyms’

  • Variety
Berlin Film Review: ‘Synonyms’
Nadav Lapid’s two previous films have all had elements of autobiography and political critique, but neither framed those traits in a vehicle as deliriously unpredictable and enthrallingly impenetrable as “Synonyms.” Breathtaking in the way it careens from one scene to the next in a whirlwind of personal and political meaning all but impossible to grasp in full measure, the film is an excoriation of Israel’s militant machismo and a self-teasing parody of Parisian stereotypes, embodied by actor Tom Mercier in this astonishingly audacious debut. Based partly on Lapid’s own past as an Israeli who moved to Paris and refused to speak Hebrew, this uncategorizable cinematic trip will polarize critics and audiences alike, with some reading it as indulgent, disjointed excess and others admiring the sheer fearlessness of it all.

Among those most likely to be scandalized, the nationalists controlling Israel’s Ministry of Culture may be surprised
See full article at Variety »

Nadav Lapid, Said Ben Said gear up for 'Synonyms' shoot in Paris

Exclusive: Producer talks Lapid’s latest; further projects with Mendonça Filho, Verhoeven, Jaoui and Sachs.

Israeli filmmaker Nadav Lapid [pictured] is gearing up for the shoot of his long-gestating Paris-set feature Synonyms in Paris this autumn with emerging compatriot actor Tom Mercier in the lead role.

“It will film this November and December,” said lead producer Saïd Ben Saïd of Paris-based Sbs Productions.

Ben Saïd is at Jerusalem Film Festival as a member of the Israeli Feature Competition jury and with Philippe Garrel’s Lover For A Day, which is playing in the International Competition.

He took over as lead producer of the project from Anne-Dominique Toussaint of Les Films des Tournelles in late 2016.

“We’re friends, it was an amicable deal. Anne-Dominique was tied up in other projects so I took over the production,” explained Ben Saïd, who will also handle international sales and French distribution.

The project, which originally had the working title Micro Robert after the
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Top 100 Most Anticipated Foreign Films of 2016: #35. Nadav Lapid’s Micro Robert

Micro Robert

Director: Nadav Lapid

Writer: Nadav Lapid

Israeli director Nadav Lapid is set to make his third film, Micro Robert, in France. Following his 2011 debut Policeman and 2014’s The Kindergarten Teacher (read review), which premiered out of competition at Critics’ Week in Cannes (and was distributed by Kino Lorber in the Us mid-2015), Lapid has become one of the most notable new auteurs out of Israel. His next project is described as a long gestating project based on the filmmaker’s own experiences in Paris a decade ago, and is said to be a departure in tone from his last film. The Us trades advertised Lapid as being ‘set’ to film in August of 2015, but the current production status is unclear.

Cast: Tba.

Production Co./Producers: Les Films des Tournelles’ Anne-Dominique Toussaint, Pie Films

U.S. Distributor: Rights Available. Tbd (domestic/international).

Release Date: Depending on when filming wraps,
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

The Kindergarten Teacher | Blu-ray Review

Released at the end of July in a limited theatrical run via Kino Lorber, a bit over a year after premiering out of competition in the 2014 Cannes Critics’ Week, Israeli director Nadav Lapid’s evasive The Kindergarten Teacher managed to net a little under forty thousand dollars after playing four venues. Less topically divisive than Lapid’s 2011 debut, Policeman (which took over two years to see a theatrical release in the Us), his sophomore narrative’s curious, and increasingly disturbing narrative, has helped secure his reputation as one of the most notable Israeli auteurs in recent memory.

Lapid once again conveys a knack for presenting us with unsettling behavior, this time around with such gradual displacement we feel uncomfortably complicit in our close observation of what plays out like a tranquil psychotic break. Intimate and at times quite pointedly critical as concerns the lavish worship and inaccurate interpretation of artistic intention,
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Arguing for Something Bigger: Nadav Lapid Discusses "The Kindergarten Teacher"

  • MUBI
Following his Jury Prize at Locarno 2011 for Policeman, Israeli director Nadav Lapid returns with The Kindergarten Teacher, a quiet story about talent, exploitation, and responsibility. Kindergarten teacher Nira (Sarit Larry) can’t quite rise over her own mediocre abilities as a poet, but when she takes five-year-old Yoav’s (Avi Shnaidman) inspired poetry as her own, her fellow poets react with jealousy and awe. Nira feels as if society at large will not support Yoav’s prodigy, so she takes it upon herself to squeeze more poems out of him—no matter the cost.Lapid and director of photography Shai Goldman shoot the film with equal amounts of distance and intimacy, landing on a distinct look that empathizes with teacher and student, but never spells out what they may be thinking. Nira’s obsessive behavior remains a spiritual pull to the boy’s Dionysian words. Yoav’s interiority may be probed through close-ups,
See full article at MUBI »

Expat in Paris: Nadav Lapid Opens Pages to “Micro Robert”

Nadav Lapid will dig into his own Parisian experience from over a decade back with his third feature film, the mini format dictionary referenced title of Micro Robert. Variety reports that French producer Anne-Dominique Toussaint (her most recent items via outfitter Les Films des Tournelles include Riad Sattouf’s Jacky au royaume des filles Louis Garrel’s Les deux amis) is producing. Israel’s Pie Films will be co-producing.

Gist: This follows the journey of an Israel man who moves to Paris. A philosophical exploration of self-identity, the movie will ponder on what remains of our core identity and world views when we become expats and switch languages.

Worth Noting: Lapid told the trade that with “‘Policeman,’ there are ghosts of terrorists, in ‘The Kindergarten Teacher,’ there are ghosts of 5-year olds, and in ‘Micro Robert’ our character will be haunted by ghosts of Paris”.

Do We Care?: With
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

The Kindergarten Teacher | Review

Dangerous Minds: Lapid’s Sophomore Film a Bizarre, Engrossing Character Study

Repressed desires find an unexpected outlet in Israeli director Nadav Lapid’s sophomore film, The Kindergarten Teacher, a sometimes mystifying character study. The director’s 2011 debut, Policeman, was a topical glance at social unrest in Israel and took three years before it saw a theatrical release in the Us, nearly a month after his second title saw a premiere outside of competition in the 2014 Cannes Critics’ Week. Lapid once again conveys a knack for presenting us with unsettling behavior, this time around with such gradual displacement we feel uncomfortably complicit in our close observation of what plays out like a tranquil psychotic break. Intimate and at times quite pointedly critical as concerns the lavish worship and inaccurate interpretation of artistic intention, Lapid continues to assert an idiosyncratic perspective as offbeat as it is potentially off-putting.

Nira (Sarit Larry
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Review: 'Policeman' Director Nadav Lapid's 'The Kindergarten Teacher'

Teaching, that most noble of professions, gets a twisted makeover in writer-director Nadav Lapid’s latest slice of contemporary Israeli life. Dedicated arthouse fans will recall “Policeman,” Lapid’s directorial debut from a few years back, which saw him weigh the dangers of ideological action on the scales of justice via the machismo of Israeli Defense Ministry’s Anti-Terrorism unit. Now, for his sophomore effort, he chooses to present his version of contemporary society through the Pov of a wholly different profession (dangerous ideologies and scales in tow.) “The Kindergarten Teacher” is a quiet, melancholic piece of work. Methodical in the way it tiptoes towards its disturbing climax, but also in its constant reminder that something’s off. If “Policeman” is more excavation than slice, then “The Kindergarten Teacher” is merely a scratch. It probes into some fascinating territories and leaves plenty of room for intellectual discussions, but it’s ultimately founded upon a forgettable.
See full article at The Playlist »

The Kindergarten Teacher review – inscrutable drama about a poetic prodigy

The verse may be reminiscent of Monty Python, but this Israeli film about a woman trying to rescue a poetry-spouting child from the world’s corrupting influence is still fascinating and perplexing

Rare is the movie where you are rooting for someone to kidnap a five-year-old child. Yet The Kindergarten Teacher, Nadav Lapid’s follow-up to his extraordinary film Policeman, slowly lays down bricks for this strangely logical path.

Nira (Sarit Larry) is a kindergarten teacher and empty-nest mother with an intellectual/artistic itch. One day she notices something curious about one of her young pupils. Yoav (Avi Schnaidman), a boy with ragamuffin’s hair but a somewhat weary, pained look on his face, will sometimes begin pacing back and forth. “I have a poem,” he’ll announce, and then burst with non-rhyming verse of a vocabulary and syntax well beyond his years.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Toddlerized Beat Generation: Kino Lorber Digs “The Kindergarten Teacher” from Sandbox

His allegorical, dense and at times discomforting sophomore film received a Special Screening slot during Cannes Film Fest’s 2014 Critics’ Week (see our video coverage below), and to my surprise was bypassed during film festival season with no-shows at Tiff and Nyff. He might only be two features in, but Nadav Lapid is batting 1000 and the Kino Lorber folks agree. IndieWIRE reports that The Kindergarten Teacher has been picked up and has been set up with a July 31st date at the Film Society of Lincoln Center in New York City, before a national expansion in August and September.

Gist: A teacher discovers in a five year-old child a prodigious gift for poetry. Amazed and inspired by this young boy, she decides to protect his talent in spite of everyone.

Worth Noting: Lapid studied cinema at the Sam Spiegel school in Jerusalem and saw his first film receive early support
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »
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