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Steve Jobs (2015)

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2:14 | Trailer

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Steve Jobs takes us behind the scenes of the digital revolution, to paint a portrait of the man at its epicenter. The story unfolds backstage at three iconic product launches, ending in 1998 with the unveiling of the iMac.

Director:

Danny Boyle

Writers:

Aaron Sorkin (screenplay), Walter Isaacson (book)
Reviews
Popularity
2,300 ( 177)
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 28 wins & 110 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Michael Fassbender ... Steve Jobs
Kate Winslet ... Joanna Hoffman
Seth Rogen ... Steve Wozniak
Jeff Daniels ... John Sculley
Michael Stuhlbarg ... Andy Hertzfeld
Katherine Waterston ... Chrisann Brennan
Perla Haney-Jardine ... Lisa Brennan (19)
Ripley Sobo ... Lisa Brennan (9)
Makenzie Moss ... Lisa Brennan (5)
Sarah Snook ... Andrea Cunningham
John Ortiz ... Joel Pforzheimer
Adam Shapiro ... Avie Tevanian
John Steen ... Mike Markkula
Stan Roth ... George Coates
Mihran Slougian ... Jandali (as Mihran Shlougian)
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Storyline

His passion and ingenuity have been the driving force behind the digital age. However his drive to revolutionize technology was sacrificial. Ultimately it affected his family life and possibly his health. In this revealing film we explore the trials and triumphs of a modern day genius, the late CEO of Apple inc. Steven Paul Jobs. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Can a great man be a good man?

Genres:

Biography | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language. | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

23 October 2015 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Jobs See more »

Filming Locations:

San Francisco, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$30,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$521,522, 11 October 2015, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$17,766,658

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$35,579,007
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | SDDS | Datasat

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The third film based on Steve Jobs' life after Pirates of Silicon Valley (1999) and Jobs (2013). See more »

Goofs

Steve asks Woz about his Nixie watch when they are speaking backstage at the NeXT launch, which takes place in 1988. While Steve Wozniak does own that watch, it wasn't made until around 2005. See more »

Quotes

Steve Jobs: There are people 'round here, man, including a member of the press.
Steve Wozniak: I see him.
Steve Jobs: Woz...
Steve Wozniak: The top guys, the ones who are getting laid off.
Steve Jobs: Listen, okay? Last year Apple lost one billion dollars. I don't even know how that's possible. You were less than 90 days from being insolvent. I had three different accountants try to explain it to me. The whole place has to be streamlined.
Steve Wozniak: Start with two of the accountants.
Steve Jobs: I started with the Apple...
Andrea Cunningham: [to the member of the press] Joel, could you come off stage?...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

The film's title is never shown in the opening or closing credits. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Film 2017: Episode #44.10 (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

Russian Roulette
Written by Daniel Pemberton
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
'Jobs' Proves Fassbender and Winslet's Worth
5 October 2015 | by ClaytonDavisSee all my reviews

There are dozens of things to truly admire about Danny Boyle's new film "Steve Jobs," from its ambition to tell a compelling story about a famous man and the structure in which it decides to tell it. The initial casting of Academy Award nominee Michael Fassbender was criticized initially because some felt he was "too good looking" to interpret a man, who was essentially a computer nerd. By the film's third sequence, Fassbender fully melts into the role and delivers one of his most visceral and intriguing performances to date. What's equally measured to his work is the talent and ferocity of Academy Award winner Kate Winslet, who falls into a sympathetic, determined woman, whose conscious is complicit in witnessing vile behavior. Aaron Sorkin's script is a multitude of words and one- liners, and is just plain smart in its dialogue exchanges between its characters. And finally, Boyle himself has never been more reserved in his direction, letting the words flow through the screen like a tractor trailer through a corn field. He sits on the sidelines, only letting instances of his vivacious direction show its head, which may or may not be a plus for Boyle enthusiasts. With all this said, it sounds like just a romp at the movies. Then why am I left underwhelmed by the final product?

We have to begin with the story's narrative structure. Choosing three set pieces in 1984, 1988, and 1998 to show the progression of the film's characters was genius. We see a growth and progression to not just Steve Jobs, but the surrounding players in which are a part of his life. The film is jam-packed with wall-to-wall dialogue, something that is truly impressive to watch unfold in the moment, but hard to take in as key information and thoughts are being displayed. I needed some more beats, to take in, and disengage from the moment, to properly move on to the next. Its a movie that clearly needs two or three viewings to get everything from it. This may be its ultimate downfall. "Steve Jobs" demands so much of its viewer. Our attention, dedication, and fearless endowment to the characters and the moment. I'm not entirely certain that general audiences can do that for 122 minutes. It becomes a double-edged sword. Is it okay that a movie such as this exists that will require us to give repeated participation to fully understand everything it has to say and reveal or does a film only deserve one shot to say everything it wants to say? I'm not sure I have a clear answer to that but I feel comfortable that general audiences members probably feel more towards the latter. Sorkin's work is compelling, with vibrantly preyed upon dialogue that simply sings through the theater. Its surely one of his most ambitious efforts of his career, and likely something that will forward his progression as a screenwriter, even in his later years.

From a performance standpoint, the film stands near the top of ensembles and individualized works seen in 2015. Fassbender approaches Jobs with a familiarity, like he knows the man. He finds sarcasm to be a second language, and repugnancy to be a way of life. Boyle and Sorkin do very little to have Jobs redeem himself, as he continues to pile on immorality with repulsive, revolting behavior that may make you think twice before talking to "Siri" ever again. I can't recall a Lead Actor candidate this unlikable in quite some time. It's a tour-de-force to behold, and one that will surely place near the top of Oscar ballots, but I'd be lying if I say I was looking forward to spending time with the character "Steve Jobs" again.

What Fassbender benefits immensely from, is a squad of supporting players, each making their individual mark. Winslet firmly plants her feet next to "Jobs," declaring herself as one of the finest actresses we have working today. Jeff Daniels as John Sculley is easily the most comfortable with the script's barrage of words. Daniels handles it with a defined purpose, delivering his best portrayal since "The Squid and the Whale." To a pleasant surprise, Seth Rogen as Steve Wozniak is tenderly inserted, and holding back all his normal tics and signature mannerisms that have made him a star. It's a welcomed entry into serious and challenging roles in the actor's future. Staggeringly underused but equally effective as each of her castmates is Katherine Waterston as Chrisann Brennan, Jobs' high-school girlfriend and "possible mother" to his daughter, played by three talented child actresses, Makenzie Moss, Perla Haney-Jardine, and Ripley Sobo. The dynamic and vigorous Michael Stuhlbarg as Andy Hertzfeld is a sensation to watch, and will go down as one of the key players by a select group of movie-goers. Let's just call this a SAG Ensemble lock, shall we?

Boyle's market for his bombastic colors and dance sequences are sure to miss them because they are non-existent. It's great to see him taking a different approach to his storytelling, though letting running text play a role should feel familiar for many. What I found dizzying was the camera work by Alwin H. Küchler, who in the spirit of "Birdman," has the audience constantly moving along with its constant walking characters. At one point, you want to just beg them to sit down and chill out for a second. Hats off to Elliot Graham's editing, who cuts to a commanding pace, even if more pauses would have been appreciated. What shines above all the technical merits is the score by Daniel Pemberton, orchestrating a symphony of music that swells in at the finest moments, and breathes new life into the work of composers everywhere. It was a truly remarkable piece of music that just flies off the screen.


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