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Norwegian Producers Embrace International Co-productions

  • Variety
Norwegian Producers Embrace International Co-productions
Blessed with scene-stealing natural beauty, Western Norway has served as a breathtaking backdrop for international films such as Alex Garland’s sci-fi drama “Ex Machina” and “Mission: Impossible — Fallout.” But local bizzers say there’s more to the region than meets the eye.

“People may already know that our region is picture perfect,” says Sigmund Elias Holm, of the Western Norway Film Commission, but “it’s also a creative hotbed open to international co-productions, whether it’s controversial docs, uncompromising drama or inventive genre films.”

With Norway the Country in Focus at this year’s European Film Market, 10 rising Norwegian producers will be presented as part of the Norwegian Producers Spotlight at the Efm Producers Hub. A number of industry professionals from Western Norway will also be on hand with new projects showcasing what the region has to offer.

Producer Maria Ekerhovd of Mer Film, whose credits include Ciro Guerra
See full article at Variety »

Game of Thrones’ Nikolaj Coster-Waldau to lead Suicide Tourist

Variety is reporting that Nikolaj Coster-Waldau (Game of Thrones) has signed on to lead the cast of Suicide Tourist, a romantic mystery drama which is shooting now under Danish director Jonas Alexander Arnby (When Animals Dream).

Suicide Tourist follows Max, an insurance claims adjuster whose investigation into a man’s disappearance leads him to a uniquely secretive hotel which offers its guests elaborate assistance in fulfilling their fantasy suicides. Caught in his own existential crisis, Max soon begins to question his perception of reality and wonders if death is the only way out of the hotel.

“[I’m excited to be] working on a truly original, thrilling and moving love story,” said Coster-Waldau. “We are halfway through the shoot, and my enthusiasm has only increased seeing the set design, the work by our Dp Niels [Thastum] and my fellow actors.”

In addition to Coster-Waldau, the film also stars Tuva Novotny (Annihilation), Sobjørg Højfeldt (Ride Upon the Storm
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘Game of Thrones’ Star Nikolaj Coster-Waldau Set for ‘Suicide Tourist’ (Exclusive)

  • Variety
‘Game of Thrones’ Star Nikolaj Coster-Waldau Set for ‘Suicide Tourist’ (Exclusive)
Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, who plays Jaime Lannister in “Game of Thrones,” heads a distinguished European cast in “Suicide Tourist,” a mystery drama with romantic elements from Copenhagen-based Snowglobe, whose production credits include “Thelma,” “The Untamed” and “Birds of a Passage.”

Described by Snowglobe in a statement as its most ambitious film to date, “Suicide Tourist” marks Danish director Jonas Alexander Arnby’s follow-up to his breakout debut “When Animals Dream,” which played in Cannes Critics’ Week and sold to Radius for the U.S. and to another score of territories. Paris-based Charades has acquired world sales rights to “Suicide Tourist” and will introduce the title to buyers at next week’s American Film Market in Santa Monica.

Coster-Waldau stars opposite Sweden’s Tuva Novotny, co-star of international productions such as “Borg vs. McEnroe” and Alex Garland’s “Annihilation.”

Arnby’s “When Animals Dream” proved catnip to distributors because of its director-driven
See full article at Variety »

Blue My Mind Review [What The Fest!? 2018]

There’s been a quite interesting subgenre outburst of late that draws parallel relationships between coming-of-age sexual awakenings and creature transformations. Werewolves, amphibious swimmers, forest beasties – films like Blue My Mind, about bodily explorations based on youthful changes that cannot be contained. Director Lisa Brühlmann focuses not on vicious animal attacks as Wildling or The Lure does, falling more in line with something heady like When Animals Dream. How perfect a metaphor? Straight forward soul-searching dramas of youth like Lady Bird and The Edge Of Seventeen are not without their own “monster moments” – genrefication just adds another uninhibited layer of depth and scaly intrigue.

Brühlmann’s muse is 15-year-old Mia (Luna Wedler), dropped into a new hometown after her parents’ recent move. This means finding new friends and avoiding “fresh meat” hazing at school, which she does by befriending posh cool-girl Gianna (Zoë Pastelle Holthuizen). After a few showings of good faith,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Jonas Arnby, Ulrika Bengts films selected for Nordic Genre Boost

  • ScreenDaily
Jonas Arnby, Ulrika Bengts films selected for Nordic Genre Boost
Seven films selected for scheme, which awards projects a $24,000 development fund.

Nordisk Film & TV Fond has confirmed the seven genre film projects selected for its popular Nordic Genre Boost scheme.

Scroll down for a full list of projects

Selections include the second feature from When Animals Dream (pictured) director Jonas Arnby of Denmark; the third feature from Finnish director Ulrika Bengts (The Disciple) and the directorial debut feature of Swedish producer Olivier Guerpillon, whose producing credits include Sound of Noise.

A total of 61 projects applied for the third and final round of Nordic Genre Boost development support.

Each project receives a $24,000 (NOK200,00) development grant, and access to two residential workshops: one held in collaboration with Night Visions International Festival in Helsinki (April 5-9), and a second during New Nordic Films’ Co-Production and Finance Market in Haugesund (Aug 22-25).

Guest tutors at the workshops include Jinga FilmsJulian Richards, Xyz FilmsTodd Brown, Lindsay Peters
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Fantasia 2016: Danish Horror Film Shelley Gives Birth to a Trailer

From the producers of When Animals Dream and Only God Forgives, director Ali Abassi’s Danish/Swedish Gothic chiller Shelley has been favorably compared to Rosemary’s Baby, which is more than enough to pique our interest. The film, an official selection at… Continue Reading →

The post Fantasia 2016: Danish Horror Film Shelley Gives Birth to a Trailer appeared first on Dread Central.
See full article at Dread Central »

Scanbox adds 'Like Crazy', 'Clash', 'I, Daniel Blake'

  • ScreenDaily
Scanbox adds 'Like Crazy', 'Clash', 'I, Daniel Blake'
Exclusive: Company also takes Cannes titles Cafe Society, The Neon Demon, The Salesman.

Scandinavian distributor Scanbox has acquired several new hot Cannes titles: Paolo Virzì’s Like Crazy [pictured] from Bac Films, Mohamed Diab’s Clash from Pyramide, and Ken Loach’s I, Daniel Blake from Wild Bunch.

At Cannes 2016, Scanbox has set a new personal best with its number of titles in the festival – it boasts Scandinavian rights to Woody Allen’s Café Society, Xavier Dolan’s It’s Only The End of the World, Asghar Farhadi’s The Salesman, Nicolas Winding Refn’s The Neon Demon, Matt RossCaptain Fantastic and David Mackenzie’s Hell or High Water.

“It marks our 12th movie with Woody Allen and our fifth with Refn. We have strong relationships with talent,” said Scanbox chairman Joni Sighvatsson. “We do anything from a small film like Clash to a big film like The Hateful Eight, we’re talent
See full article at ScreenDaily »

When Animals Dream: how werewolf films explore growing pains

Adolescent agony meets anaesthetised acting in this po-faced example of a familiar teen horror trope

Creeping on to DVD and streaming platforms almost exactly two years after its premiere at the 2014 Cannes film festival, When Animals Dream sets out its stall at a languid pace in keeping with a delay of that length. In a small Danish fishing village of Agger, the film finds 16-year-old Marie on the cusp of adulthood, having all but outgrown the home she shares with her stoic father and mysteriously catatonic mother. After finding a job at a fish-processing facility and a boyfriend who looks like Ronan Keating, Marie seems to have amassed all the key hallmarks of adulthood, and that’s to say nothing of the thick coat of hair growing all over her body.

Though its Nordic origins and sombre tone have seen When Animals Dream lazily compared to Let The Right One In,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Danish outfit Snowglobe launches with Guerra, Escalante, Reygadas films

  • ScreenDaily
Danish outfit Snowglobe launches with Guerra, Escalante, Reygadas films
Exclusive: Mikkel Jersin, Katrin Pors, and Eva Jakobsen are working on films with Amat Escalante, Carlos Reygadas and Ciro Guerra.

Danish producers Mikkel Jersin (Sparrows), Katrin Pors (The Untamed) and Eva Jakobsen (Antboy) have joined forces to launch Snowglobe, a new production outfit that will back director-driven films.

Snowglobe, which will have a focus on international co-productions, is currently working with established auteurs such as Colombia’s Embrace Of The Serpent director Ciro Guerra and Mexican directors Amat Escalante and Carlos Reygadas.

The company is producing, alongside Guerra’s usual producer Cristina Gallego, his next film Birds Of Passage, which will start shooting in January 2017.

Pors says: “It is the story of an indigenous family from La Guajira Desert who get involved in a war to control a business that ends up destroying their lives and their culture. It’s the story of the origins of drug trafficking in the 1970s in Colombia.”

The company
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Danish outfit Snowglobe launches with Guerra, Ascalante, Reygadas films

  • ScreenDaily
Danish outfit Snowglobe launches with Guerra, Ascalante, Reygadas films
Exclusive: Mikkel Jersin, Katrin Pors, and Eva Jakobsen are working on films with Amat Escalante, Carlos Reygadas and Ciro Guerra.

Danish producers Mikkel Jersin (Sparrows), Katrin Pors (The Untamed) and Eva Jakobsen (Antboy) have joined forces to launch Snowglobe, a new production outfit that will back director-driven films.

Snowglobe, which will have a focus on international co-productions, is currently working with established auteurs such as Colombia’s Embrace Of The Serpent director Ciro Guerra and Mexican directors Amat Escalante and Carlos Reygadas.

The company is producing, alongside Guerra’s usual producer Cristina Gallego, his next film Birds Of Passage, which will start shooting in January 2017.

Pors says: “It is the story of an indigenous family from La Guajira Desert who get involved in a war to control a business that ends up destroying their lives and their culture. It’s the story of the origins of drug trafficking in the 1970s in Colombia.”

The company
See full article at ScreenDaily »

10 Promising Independent Horror Films to Watch Out For This Year

  • Vulture
10 Promising Independent Horror Films to Watch Out For This Year
The blockbuster business these days is all about spandex and sequels and reboots. It’s never been a better time to be a superhero, but if you know where to look, it’s also never been a better time to be a horror buff. Genre festivals like Fantastic Fest and Beyond Fest are bigger than ever, while the Midnight lineups at heavyweight events like Sundance, South by Southwest, and the Toronto International Film Festival have become pipelines for movies that generate buzz on par with the more conventional prestige fare. What’s more, digital distribution platforms like Netflix and Amazon have given life to niche horror films that don’t command nationwide theatrical releases. Going to see Guillermo del Toro’s sprawling Gothic romance Crimson Peak on the big screen was beautiful and all, but Mark Duplass’s microbudget Creep is terrifying and available to stream at a moment’s notice.
See full article at Vulture »

Les Arcs Coproduction Village unveils 2015 line-up

  • ScreenDaily
Les Arcs Coproduction Village unveils 2015 line-up
New projects revealed from I, Anna director Barnaby Southcombe, When Animals Dream filmmaker Jonas Alexander Arnby and actor/director Hiam Abbass.Scroll down for full line-up

The Les Arcs Coproduction Village (Dec 12-15), held as part of the Les Arcs European Film Festival (Dec 12-19), has unveiled the projects for its 7th edition.

A total of 25 projects have been selected for the three-day development and financing platform, which has previously showcased festival hits including Lazlo Nemes’ Son Of Saul, Alice Rohrwacher’s The Wonders, Grimur Hakonarson’s Rams and Runar Runarsson’s Sparrows.

This year’s line-up includes projects from 13 countries and five from Norway, selected as part of this year’s Norwegian Focus. Eight debut features are included in the selection.

Representatives of the projects will have one-to-one pre-scheduled meetings with producers, sales agents and distributors.

Two conferences will also be held during the Coproduction Village: one about the production of Joachim Trier’s Cannes competition
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Monte’s Movie Mayhem: The Visit, Turbo Kid, Deathgasm

[Editor's Note: We're bringing some of our columns from Deadly Magazine into Daily Dead as well and today we have a look at our review roundup from Monte he likes to call "Movie Mayhem." Each month, he'll give you the rundown on movies he watched over the last 30 days that you may be interested in checking out. In the first installment on Daily Dead, find out what he thought of The Visit, Turbo Kid, Deathgasm, and more...]

The Visit: “The Visit” is a modern day spin of a familiar grim fairy tale; you could call it “Hansel and Gretel” the documentary. Director M. Night Shyamalan returns to better form with another frightening tale where children are placed in the center of complicated, sometimes perilous, situations. Shyamalan, a director whose films have been a mix of accomplishment and disappointment, crafts an effective horror film with “The Visit”, a scaled down success of simple and strategic storytelling heavy on the “creepy” factor. Ploys like a rickety old house, monsters with smiling faces, and the hand-held horror techniques are a few of the genre characteristics that are utilized by Shyamalan. While some of time this works other times it falls into familiar trappings, like annoyingly predictable jump scares. Still “The Visit” is effectively strange enough to keep one watching until the end.

3.5 out of 5.00

Turbo Kid: Some call
See full article at DailyDead »

September 29th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Christine, Savage Weekend

  • DailyDead
We’re only a little over a month away from Halloween now, kiddies, and Tuesday’s home entertainment releases are primed to get you ready for the haunting season. John Carpenter’s classic adaptation of Stephen King’s Christine is making its way to Blu-ray on September 29th, as well as the cult slasher film Savage Weekend, which is being presented by the fine folks over at Kino Lorber.

For those of you Cannon Films fans out there, Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films documentary is arriving on DVD this week and Kevin Bacon’s latest outstanding thriller, Cop Car, is also coming to Blu and DVD September 29th. A handful of indie horror films are also being released this week, and for those of you out there with genre-loving progeny, a few fun movies perfect for younger viewers will arrive on home media as well.

Christine (Sony Pictures Home Entertainment,
See full article at DailyDead »

Watch a trailer for the Danish horror film ‘What We Become’

Due to have its world premiere at the upcoming Fantastic Fest in Austin, an international trailer has been released for What We Become, the debut feature from writer-director Bo Mikkelsen. What We Become is the latest entry in new Nordic Twilight movement which includes a wave of intelligent, character driven genre pictures such as Let the Right One In and When Animals Dream.

What We Become tells the story of a family whose perfect suburban life is abruptly shattered by the arrival of a mysterious virus and later forced into quarantine. However, the family soon realizes that what’s killing their neighbors is not the flu. With things quickly escalating, it isn’t long before the family takes matters into his own hands.

What We Become – International Trailer from Indie Sales on Vimeo.

The post Watch a trailer for the Danish horror film ‘What We Become’ appeared first on PopOptiq.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Is What We Become The Next Great Viral Outbreak Flick?

Of all the films playing at this year's Fantastic Fest, What We Become ranks as my most anticipated. The film about a family forced to take desperate measures when they are quarantined in the midst of a strange viral outbreak sounds right up my alley.

Add to that the fact that people are saying the film is "a gorgeously executed picture that prizes its characters as much as the elements of genre film... it exemplifies the new Nordic Twilight movement – a wave of intelligent, character driven genre pictures including the likes of Let The Right One In and When Animals Dream."

What We Become marks the debut feature from writer-director Bo Mikkelsen. There's no trailer or clips from the film yet, but we've compiled a nice gallery of evocative stills that are s [Continued ...]
See full article at QuietEarth »

Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf-Woman? A Film Review

*full disclosure: an online screener of this film was provided by Radius TWC. Director: Jonas Alexander Arnby. Writers: Rasmus Birch, Christoffer Boe, Jonas Alexander Arnby. Cast: Sonia Suhl, Lars Mikkelsen, Sonya Richter. When Animals Dream is the first feature-length film from Danish director, Jonas Alexander Arnby. This artsy body horror/drama premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2014, receiving well-deserved critical acclaim. In the film, sixteen-year-old Marie struggles to form an identity in a small coastal town. To make matters worse, she discovers that she's not like other females, or other humans. Although female coming of age stories are fairly common in horror movies (2000's Ginger Snaps being one of the better ones), there is something unique about this picture. Something subtle. Without copious amounts of violence and gore, this picture slowly tightens its grip, pulling the viewer in. This is not a start to finish action-packed edge of your seat film,
See full article at 28 Days Later Analysis »

Review: Coming-Of-Age Werewolf Tale 'When Animals Dream'

The mood in the evocative opening credits of Jonas Alexander Arnby's coming-of-age werewolf tale, "When Animals Dream," coils around the senses like a seductive viper. As the soulful violin plays over translucent antique brass images of the Danish countryside, and names are lured out of the mist, you get the feeling that you're in for something truly great. Alas, it's a feeling that becomes more ephemeral with every passing minute of the film's running time. Quentin Tarantino made headlines last week with his interview, in which he singled out "It Follows" as a recent example of a film that's "so good you get mad at it for not being great," pointing out that David Robert Mitchell "broke" his mythology. Well, in Arnby's case, you can't break something that's not even there. It’s a narrative vacuum big enough to make you mad at this melancholy werewolf drama for not being,
See full article at The Playlist »

When Animals Dream Review

The werewolf genre is a tricky beast to tame, but when handled properly, some serious creature-feature chills can be achieved. Take Jonas Alexander Arnby’s When Animals Dream, for example. His delivery is a focused glance at one girl’s transformation into a recognizably hairy monster, but it burns slowly, building tension as the female specimen becomes comfortable in her new skin. It’s not the rip-roaring adventure something like Universal’s The Woflman reboot aims to be, or David Hayter’s goofy full-suited snoozer, Wolves. If either of those are more you speed, this gruesome coming-of-age story might not be your favorite breed, but those looking for something a bit weightier than fighting costumed stuntmen will find tenderness and intrigue in Arnby’s unexpectedly familial thriller.

Newcomer Sonia Suhl stars as Marie, a small-town girl who lives with her sick mother and caretaker father. As she starts to embark more on her own,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Arthouse Audit: 'Grandma' Grabs Big Second Week, 'Phoenix' Continues to Rise

Arthouse Audit: 'Grandma' Grabs Big Second Week, 'Phoenix' Continues to Rise
There is some good news. Sony Pictures Classics' "Grandma" expanded well and IFC's German import "Phoenix" is building strong word-of-mouth success. But overall business is off. Last year's equivalent late-August weekend boasted six specialized films grossing over $500,000 in their later weeks. This year had none. And no new openings topped a $10,000 per theater average. Four more Sundance 2015 films opened this week. Only Brazil's "The Second Mother" (Oscilloscope) hit theaters alone, with three other entries ("Z for Zachariah," "Turbo Kid" and "Zipper") going into parallel video on demand release. Of the roughly 50 films released so far from the Park City lineup, 20 (40%) have been multi-platform (a handful went out one or two weeks after their theatrical openings). "Zipper" (Alchemy) with Patrick Wilson did around $8,000 in 17 theaters. Radius/Weinstein's Danish "When Animals Dream,"...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »
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