6.0/10
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42 user 98 critic

The Mercy (2018)

Not Rated | | Adventure, Biography, Drama | 30 November 2018 (USA)
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The incredible story of amateur sailor Donald Crowhurst and his solo attempt to circumnavigate the globe. The struggles he confronted on the journey while his family awaited his return is one of the most enduring mysteries of recent times.

Director:

James Marsh

Writer:

Scott Z. Burns
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4,122 ( 643)

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Cast

Credited cast:
Rachel Weisz ... Clare Crowhurst
Colin Firth ... Donald Crowhurst
David Thewlis ... Rodney Hallworth
Kerry Godliman ... Bear and Swan Landlady
Mark Gatiss ... Ronald Hall
Jonathan Bailey ... Ian Wheeler
Genevieve Gaunt ... Miss Teignmouth
Ken Stott ... Stanley Best
Andrew Buchan ... Ian Milburn
Simon McBurney ... Sir Francis Chichester
Anna Madeley ... Sara Milburn
Adrian Schiller ... Mr. Elliot
Tim Downie ... Style Editor
Sebastian Armesto ... Nelson Messina
Finn Elliot ... James Crowhurst
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Storyline

The incredible story of Donald Crowhurst , an amateur sailor who competed in the 1968 Sunday Times Golden Globe Race in the hope of becoming the first person in history to single-handedly circumnavigate the globe without stopping. With an unfinished boat and his business and house on the line, Donald leaves his wife, Clare and their children behind, hesitantly embarking on an adventure on his boat the Teignmouth Electron. The story of Crowhurst's dangerous solo voyage and the struggles he confronted on the epic journey while his family awaited his return is one of the most enduring mysteries of recent times. Written by Anonymous

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Taglines:

From the Academy Award winning director of "The Theory of Everything". See more »


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English | Spanish

Release Date:

30 November 2018 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Untitled Donald Crowhurst Project See more »

Filming Locations:

Teignmouth, Devon, England, UK See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$32,000,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

During the filming, Colin Firth was hospitalised with a hip dislocation. See more »

Goofs

When the Teignmouth Electron is leaving harbour, the yachts in the background have a stern shape that's about 40 years too modern. See more »

Quotes

Sir Francis Chichester: The only thing that I can imagine that would test a man more than sailing around the world in a boat alone, stopping only once, is not stopping at all. And "The Sunday Times" has asked me here today to announce just such a challenge. There will be a cash prize for the man who comes first, and a prize for the man who is fastest.
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Connections

Featured in Projector: The Mercy (2018) See more »

Soundtracks

Maria Elena
Written by Lorenzo Barcelata
Performed by Los Indios Tabajaras
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User Reviews

 
"With shroud, and mast, and pennon fair"
16 February 2018 | by bob-the-movie-manSee all my reviews

It's 1968. Donald Crowhurst (Colin Firth, "Kingsman: The Golden Circle"; "Magic in the Moonlight"), an amateur sailor and entrepreneur based in Teignmouth, Devon, is inspired by listening to single-handed round-the-world yachtsman Sir Francis Chichester and does a a crazy thing. He puts his business, his family's house and his own life on the line by entering the Sunday Times single-handed round-the-world yacht race. It's not even as if he has a boat built yet!

Lending him the money, under onerous terms, are local businessman Mr Best (Ken Stott, "The Hobbit") and local newspaper editor Rodney Hallworth (David Thewlis, "Wonder Woman", "The Theory of Everything"). With the race deadline upon him, Crowhurst is pressed into sailing away from his beloved wife Clare (Rachel Weisz, "Denial", "The Lobster") and young family in a trimaran that is well below par.

But what happens next is so ludicrous that it makes a mockery of whoever wrote this ridiculous work of fiction. Ah... but wait a minute... it's a true story!

It is in fact such an astonishing story that this is a film that is easy to spoil in a review, a fact that seems to have passed many UK newspaper reviewers by (aarrrggghhh!!). So I will leave much comment to a "spoiler section" on http://bob-the-movie-man.com. The trailer is also best avoided: this is honestly a film worth seeing cold.

What can I say that is spoiler-free then?

Firth and Weisz make a well-matched couple, and the rest of the cast is peppered with well-known faces from British film and (particularly) TV: Andrew Buchan and Jonathan Bailey (from "Broadchurch"); Mark Gatiss ("Sherlock", "Out Kind of Traitor"); Adrian Schiller ("Victoria"; "Beauty and the Beast").

The first part of the film is well executed and excellent value for older viewers. 60's Devon is warm, bucolic and nostalgic. In fact, the film beautifully creates the late 60's of my childhood, from the boxy hardwood furniture of the Crowhurst's house to the Meccano set opened at Christmas time.

Once afloat though, the film is less successful at getting its sea-legs. The story is riveting, but quite a number of the scenes raise more questions than they answer. As stress takes hold it is perhaps not surprising that there are a few fantastical flights of movie fancy. But some specific elements in Scott Burns' script don't quite gel: a brass clock overboard is a case in point. What? Why?

And it seems to be light on the fallout from the race: there is a weighty scene in the trailer between Best and Hallworth that (unless I dozed off!) I don't think appeared in the final cut, and I think was needed.

All in all, I was left feeling mildly dissatisfied: a potentially good film by "Theory of Everything" director James Marsh that rather goes off the rails in the final stretch.

This was a time where morality and honour were often rigidly adhered to - British "stiff upper lip" and all that - and seemed to carry a lot more weight than they do today. So some of the decisions in the film might mystify younger viewers. But for the packed older audience in my showing then it was a gripping, stressful, but far from flawless watch.

I'd also like to take this opportunity to pay my respects to the film's composer Jóhann Jóhannsson, who shockingly died last week at the ridiculously young age of 48. His strange and atmospheric music for films including "The Theory of Everything", "Sicario" and (particularly) "Arrival" set him on the path to be a film composing great of the future. Like James Horner, another awful and untimely loss to the film music industry.

(For the full graphical review - and a spoiler section for those who have seen the film - please visit bob-the-movie-man.com. Thanks).


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