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Film Review: Believer (2018) by Lee Hae-yeong

One of the finest Hong Kong cop thrillers of the previous decade, Johnnie To’s celebrated “Drug War” was a major success when it was released and continued his stance as one of the country’s finest modern directors. Now four years later, South Korea has opted for a remake of the film that takes the core essence of the same story into a new direction with Lee Hae-yeong’s new effort “Believer”.

Believer” is screening at the Udine Far East Film Festival

After a friend is killed, determined cop Won-ho now has more ammunition than ever to nail the drug kingpin at the centre of the past two years of his life. After getting further clues to his identity, he and his squad begin an operation with the survivor of one of the attacks, Rak, a low-level employee in the operation, and begin to work through the organisation, in order to reach the top.
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Cannes: Bong Joon-ho Says ‘Parasite’ Is Too Local to Win Competition

  • Variety
Having been partially responsible for the Netflix fall out with the Cannes Film Festival, “Okja” and “Snowpiercer” director Bong Joon-ho returns to Cannes competition this year with conventionally- financed “Parasite.” But the Korean-language film is a tragicomedy that Bong says may be too nuanced for the festival.

“Cannes always makes me feel excited, fresh, and nervous. I am very happy to premiere my film, which took so much work, at the hottest, most passionate place,” Bong said at an event held in Seoul on Monday. “But I doubt whether the film could be 100% understood (by foreign audiences). ‘Parasite’ is full of details and nuances that are specific to Koreans. I think the film’s Korean premiere after Cannes will be the most exciting moment for me.”

The themes that Bong has explored in his previous films, such as social class and family dynamics, will again feature. ” “Parasite’ is a story
See full article at Variety »

Trailer for Upcoming Korean film “Bad Police” by Lee Jeong-beom

The last time Lee Sun-kyun played a cop was in 2014’s hit “A Hard Day”, where he played a corrupt cop trying to cover up a road accident death. In 2019, we will see him play a corrupt police office once again in “Bad Police” by director Lee Jeong-beom.

Synopsis

Most of the plot is still under wraps, but “Bad Police” follows a bad cop as he stands up to an even worse society.

The latest film from Lee Jeong-beom, whose films include “The Man from Nowhere” and “No Tears for the Dead”, “Bad Police” also co-stars Jeon So-nee (“After My Death”) and Park Hae-joon. It is set to release in South Korea on March 21st, 2019.
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Film Review: The Spy Gone North (2018) by Yoon Jong-bin

South Korean spy films have almost exclusively been action fares: an undercover agent from the North is stuck in the South or vice versa or agents from both agencies work together for a common end with lots of big action set pieces and hand-to-hand combats. This makes director Yoong Jong-bin’s latest film “The Spy Gone North” quite a unique effort, in that it draws inspiration from a real-life operation in South Korean covert operations history, to gives us a solid espionage thriller in the real sense.

The Spy Gone North” is screening at the International Film Festival Rotterdam

It’s 1993. News of the North establishing reactor plants capable of manufacturing nuclear weaponry have worried the power structures in South Korea, which leads the National Intelligence Agency, spearheaded by Director Choi Hak-seong, to put in place a spy to find out more about the status of these rumoured plants. Enter Park Suk-young,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

The Latest Trailer for Netflix's Medieval Korean Zombie Series Kingdom Puts More Focus on the Horror

We’ve got another trailer to share with you for Netflix’s new series, Kingdom, which is set in medieval Korea where warriors are forced to battle the undead! While the previously released trailers have offered details on the story and setting, this new trailer puts more of a focus on the kind of horror that we will see in the show.

Kingdom is set in Korea during the five centuries of Korea’s Joseon Dynasty (1392-1897). The story centers around a deceased king who rises from the dead as a mysterious plague begins to spread across the land. The prince must face a new breed of undead enemies as he unveils the evil and saves his people.

Here’s the official synopsis:

In a kingdom defeated by corruption and famine, a mysterious plague spreads to turn the infected into monsters. The crown prince, framed for treason and desperate to save his people,
See full article at GeekTyrant »

‘Kingdom’ Trailer: Bae Doona Flees Zombies in Medieval Korea

We finally get a glimpse of more Bae Doona in the latest Kingdom trailer for the Netflix original K-drama. The horror series combines two of the things that Korean cinema and TV excel at lately: zombies and medieval period dramas. In other words, this series looks awesome. Kingdom Trailer Directed by Kim Seong-hun (A Hard Day) and written by Signal scribe Kim […]

The post ‘Kingdom’ Trailer: Bae Doona Flees Zombies in Medieval Korea appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Trailers for Upcoming Korean Movie “Take Point” by Kim Byung-woo

Ha Jung-woo, one of South Korea’s most bankable superstars, has had a good run in the past few years. While the two “Along With the Gods” films were among the most successful Korean films of all time, his performances in “1987: When the Day Comes”, “The Tunnel” and “The Handmaiden” were universally praised. It’s been a while since he has been in action mode though, but that changes with his next film “Take Point” (called “Pmc” domestically) by director Kim Byung-woo.

Synopsis

Under the tense situation between South Korea and North Korea, hired Pmc (Private Military Company) attempt a daring rescue within an underground bunker.

While the synopsis may seem meagre, the trailers are interesting for their use of mostly English dialogue as well as for their gritty-looking action set-pieces. Director Kim Byung-woo reteams with Ha Jung-woo for his first film since 2013’s “The Terror Live”. “Take Point
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Bong Joon Ho thriller 'Parasite' sells to Us, Japan, France

Cj sells North America rights to Neon; the Korean company has also boarded The Garden Of Evening Mists for international sales.

South Korea’s Cj Entertainment has locked multiple pre-sales deals on Okja director Bong Joon Ho’s latest project Parasite and has picked up international sales rights on Starry Starry Night director Tom Lin’s The Garden Of Evening Mists, adapted from the Man Booker Prize-nominated novel of the same title.

Parasite is Bong’s return to Korean-language filmmaking after Okja and Snowpiercer, and stars Song Kang Ho in his fourth collaboration with the director. The film has sold
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Film Review: Believer (2018) by Lee Hae-yeong

One of the finest Hong Kong cop thrillers of the previous decade, Johnnie To’s celebrated “Drug War” was a major success when it was released and continued his stance as one of the country’s finest modern directors. Now four years later, South Korea has opted for a remake of the film that takes the core essence of the same story into a new direction with Lee Hae-yeong’s new effort “Believer”.

After a friend is killed, determined cop Won-ho now has more ammunition than ever to nail the drug kingpin at the center of the past two years of his life. After getting further clues to his identity, he and his squad begin an operation with the survivor of one of the attacks, Rak, a low-level employee in the operation, and begin to work through the organization, in order to reach the top. Complicated by
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Film Review: Man of Will (2017) by Lee Won-tae

With a history as rich and vast as the peninsula of Korea’s, it is no surprise that films based on the lives of revered national figures are made in South Korea in plenty. It is, however, baffling that no film that focused specifically on the very eventful life of activist, freedom fighter and the last Premier of the Provisional Government of the Republic of Korea, Kim Koo, had been made so far. He is finally given his just dues in Lee Won-tae’s biopic “Man of Will”, starring Cho Jin-woong and Song Seung-heon, which focuses on his early days when he was still called Kim Chang-soo.

The film starts with the fight that would change the course of Kim Chang-soo’s life, where he ends up killing a Japanese man. As it turns out, Kim Chang-soo killed the man because he suspects him of having assassinated the beloved Empress Myeongseong,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Film Review: ‘Believer’

  • Variety
Film Review: ‘Believer’
Johnnie To’s gritty mainland crime epic “Drug War” (2012) is given a slick and mostly effective South Korean re-tooling in “Believer.” Centered on a dogged cop obsessed with flushing out a mysterious drug kingpin, this pacy outing is loaded with colorful characters but fails to deliver the emotional intensity it promises. The first feature by director and co-writer Lee Hae-young since his classy period thriller “The Silenced” (2015), “Believer” has notched two million admissions since its May 22 local release. An entertaining action-thriller accessible for non-Korean viewers, “Believer” ought to perform well when it opens June 8 on 23 North American screens.

Action-packed but free of the extreme brutality that sometimes hinders the commercial prospects of Korean genre films in offshore markets, “Believer” borrows just the basics of To’s film. While faithfully recreating some of the original’s most famous sequences, Lee and female co-writer Chung Seo-kyung have significantly altered plot and character details elsewhere.
See full article at Variety »

Bong Joon-ho’s ‘Parasite’ Starts Shooting (Exclusive)

Bong Joon-ho’s ‘Parasite’ Starts Shooting (Exclusive)
South Korea’s top filmmaker, Bong Joon-ho has begun shooting “Parasite,” his first film since “Okja” which was backed by Netflix and debuted in competition last year in Cannes. It stars Song Kang-ho, Korea’s leading character actor.

The film is a drama about a family of four, in which each member has unique characteristics. Bong says that, despite the title, the film does not include either parasites or alien creatures.

Production started on Sunday. “The film had been originally scheduled to start shooting in our studio on May 25, but was pushed back slightly,” a spokesperson from Goyang Aqua Studio, an outfit that specializes in underwater shooting, told Variety on Wednesday.

After shooting “Snowpiercer” and “Okja” largely in English, the film is Bong’s first Korean-language title since his 2009 “Mother.” He has reassembled production elements from “Mother.” Barunson E&A is on board as producer. Cj Entertainment is set as the Korean distributor.
See full article at Variety »

Time to Become a ‘Believer’ in the Re-make of ‘Drug War’

The first trailer of Believer, the highly-anticipated remake of Johnnie To’s 2012 Hong Kong crime thriller Drug War, has been unveiled ahead of its May 24th release in South Korea.

Lee Hae-young, the director of The Silenced, brings to the screen the tale of detective Won-ho (Cho Jin-woong from A Hard Day). He teams up with drug dealer Rak (Ryu Jun-yeol of A Taxi Driver) in the hopes of infiltrating and taking down a major crime syndicate that oversees the dark world of drug trade in South Korea.

The film will also act as a final bow for the late actor Kim Joo-hyuk, who sadly passed away this last November. If the trailer is any indication, however, his turn as the crazed drug kin pin Ha-rim will be a memorable, worthy swan song.

Buckle up and check out the action-packed, fast-paced trailer below.

Source: ScreenAnarchy
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Explosive New Trailer for Korean Drug War Remake Will Make You a Believer

The much-anticipated Korean remake of Johnnie To's crime drama Drug War has dropped an electric first trailer ahead of its domestic release on May 24. From The Silenced director Lee Hae-young, the film will head overseas under the new international title Believer. Cho Jin-woong (A Hard Day) takes the lead role, played by Sun Honglei in the original, of detective Won-ho, who is looking to take down a large crime syndicate that controls the drug trade in Korea. Rising superstar Ryu Jun-yeol (A Taxi Driver) fills Louis Koo's shoes as Rak, the drug pusher who teams up with Won-ho to take them on. Park Hae-joon (Fourth Place), Kim Sung-ryoung (The Fatal Encounter) and Cha Seung-won (Man on High Heels) co-star in the crime thriller, which also...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

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