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(2015)

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Cesar Awards 2017: Isabelle Huppert and Xavier Dolan Lead This Year’s Winners

Cesar Awards 2017: Isabelle Huppert and Xavier Dolan Lead This Year’s Winners
Before Hollywood takes the spotlight this weekend, the film world turns its eyes to France for the annual Cesar Awards. Presented by the French Academy, this year’s nominees represent a distinct blend of international favorites, festival standouts and homegrown hits.

Paul Verhoeven’s “Elle” led this year’s nominees, scoring 11 nominations for Verhoeven as Best Director, lead actress Isabelle Huppert, Best Adapted Screenplay and a trio of other acting awards.

Read More: ‘Elle,’ Isabelle Huppert, Xavier Dolan Nominated in France’s Cesar Awards

The evening’s winners at Paris’ Salle Pleyel featured a variety of upsets and sure things. Huppert, going into a busy weekend in the States, won her category. In a pair of surprises, Xavier Dolan and Gaspard Ulliel both won their respective categories for Dolan’s “It’s Only the End of the World.” Houda Benyamina’s debut feature “Divines” also won big, taking home prizes for Best First Film,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Elle,’ Isabelle Huppert, Xavier Dolan Nominated in France’s Cesar Awards

‘Elle,’ Isabelle Huppert, Xavier Dolan Nominated in France’s Cesar Awards
France’s film community congratulated Isabelle Huppert on her Oscar nomination, adding yet another to her growing list of accolades for her performance in “Elle.” The French Academy announced its nominees for what Americans call the “French Oscars” on Wednesday morning. “Elle” received 11 nominations in total, including best film and best director for Paul Verhoeven.

Following in a close send was Francois Ozon’s “Frantz,” which garnered 10 nominations, and Bruno Dumont’s “Slack Bay,” which received nine. Xavier Dolan received a best director nomination for “It’s Only the End of the World.” Actors Vincent Cassel, Gaspard Ulliel, and Nathalie Baye were all nominated for their work in Dolan’s film as well.

Read More: Oscars 2017 Surprises and Snubs: Amy Adams and ‘Weiner’ Out, Mel Gibson and ‘Passengers’ In

The Cesars have little import on the Oscars, though there is often some crossover. The French Academy did recognize Kenneth Lonergan
See full article at Indiewire »

The 50 Most Overlooked Films of 2016

There are a multitude of reasons why any film may get unfairly overlooked. It could be a lack of marketing resources to provide a substantial push, or, due to a minuscule roll-out, not enough critics and audiences to be the champions it might require. It could simply be the timing of the picture itself; even in the world of studio filmmaking, some features take time to get their due. With an increasingly crowded marketplace, there are more reasons than ever that something might not find an audience and, as with last year, we’ve rounded up the releases that deserved more attention.

Note that all of the below films made less than $1 million at the domestic box office at the time of posting — VOD figures are not accounted for, as they normally aren’t made public — and are, for the most part, left out of most year-end conversations. Sadly, most
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Best Cinematography of 2016

“A cinematographer is a visual psychiatrist — moving an audience through a movie […] making them think the way you want them to think, painting pictures in the dark,” said the late, great Gordon Willis. As we continue our year-end coverage, one aspect we must highlight is, indeed, cinematography, among the most vital to the medium. From talented newcomers to seasoned professionals, we’ve rounded up the examples that have most impressed us this year. Check out our rundown below and, in the comments, let us know your favorite work.

Arrival (Bradford Young)

At this point, it would be unfair to call Bradford Young an up-and-coming cinematographer. While it’s an accurate description in terms of his relative years behind the camera, the caliber of his work already feels like one of the most accomplished in the genre. Ahead of a Han Solo prequel, he got his first taste with sci-fi thanks to Denis Villeneuve‘s Arrival.
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Best Movie Posters of 2016

  • MUBI
1. CosmosAdam Maida’s silent scream for Andrzej Zulawski’s swansong Cosmos is a poster that cries out to be noticed. Channeling the starkest of Polish poster design—think Mieczyslaw Wasilewski or Andrzej Pagowski—Maida’s design is as deceptively crude as it is beautifully executed. I love everything about this poster, down to its hand-lettering, that tiny hanged bird and the even tinier—nice if you can get away with it—billing block. Maida’s witty, diagrammatic work has already graced Criterion covers for Nagisa Oshima’s Death by Hanging, John Frankenheimer’s The Manchurian Candidate, and Costa-Gavras’s The Confession and State of Siege, but it is his eye-catching black-and-white editorial illustration/montages for the New York Times that this most reminds me of. You can see more of his work here.2. The HandmaidenTrees and a hanging also feature heavily in my second favorite poster of the year: an
See full article at MUBI »

Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Punch-Drunk Love,’ ‘Cosmos,’ ‘Dreams,’ ‘Dead Ringers,’ and More

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Cosmos (Andrzej Żuławski)

If there’s any way to synthesize the many pieces that form the bull-in-a-china-shop filmmaking that is Andrzej Żuławski‘s Cosmos, an adaptation of Witold Gombrowicz‘s novel, consider its status as his first feature in fifteen years. Might some sense of long-awaited release account for its why and how — the intensity of its performances, the force of its camera moves, the sharpness of its cuts, the bombast of its emotions? I’m inclined to think so,
See full article at The Film Stage »

New to Streaming: ’13th,’ ‘Knight of Cups,’ ‘Cosmos,’ ‘Timecrimes,’ ‘Under the Shadow,’ and More

Editor’s Note: After a two-week vacation break, we are back with an expanded selection to catch up on what we missed! Enjoy below.

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

13th (Ava DuVernay)

Humanity gave birth to inequality. The American experience is rooted in institutionalized racial inequity. Our forefathers came to this nation either by choice or by force. Once here, this distinction coalesced into a convoluted caste system driven by notions of survival and supremacy,
See full article at The Film Stage »

DVD Review: Cosmos

  • CineVue
★★★☆☆ Prepare to be well and truly bamboozled. Attaining maddening, yet fascinating, levels of abstraction and ambiguity, Cosmos is the final feature from Polish auteur Andzrej Zulawski, who passed away in February. His last project is nigh on impossible to fully comprehend; an unclassifiable, existential mind-bender which takes us down the rabbit hole of human nature and thought via the warped psyche and piercing, goggly eyes of law school drop out and aspiring novelist, Witold (Jonathan Genet). Imagine Withnail and I after something a little more potent than two double gins and a pint of cider.
See full article at CineVue »

The Best Films of Summer 2016

“‘2016 is a bad year for film’ is just another way of saying ‘I really blew it when I chose what films to watch in 2016,'” producer Keith Calder recently said. Taking this statement to heart, as summer winds down, there’s no shortage of writing about how the season was a disappointment overall — but, on the contrary, there have been gems throughout the last four months, and we’ve set out to name our favorites.

All of the below films received at least one-week theatrical runs in the United States from May to August, and while some are still in theaters, many are now currently available to stream. Check out our favorites below and let us know what you most enjoyed this summer. One can also see our fall preview series, which just kicked off this week, here.

A Bigger Splash (Luca Guadagnino)

Despite a loose script that justifies little,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Locarno: Here’s What One Young Filmmaker Learned From Hou Hsiao-hsien and Edward Yang

This article was produced as part of the Locarno Critics Academy, a workshop for aspiring journalists at the Locarno Film Festival, a collaboration between the Locarno Film Festival, IndieWire and the Film Society of Lincoln Center with the support of Film Comment and the Swiss Alliance of Film Journalists. The following interview, conducted by a member of the Critics Academy, focuses on a participant in the affiliated Filmmakers Academy program at the festival.

With no prior film education, filmmaker Wei Liang Chiang relocated to Taiwan to participate in the sixth Golden Horse Film Academy under the mentorship of filmmakers Hou Hsiao-hsien and Arvin Chen. Like his cinematic mentors, Chiang’s work, varying from realist portraits to melodramas, captures the intersection of the personal and political with patience and warmth.

His 2015 film, “Anchorage Prohibited,” won the Audi Short Film Award at the 66th Berlin International Film Festival. Comprised of long takes and minimal dialogue,
See full article at Indiewire »

Arthouse Audit: ‘Tickled’ Leads Long List of Modest Openers

It’s only June and it already feels like the dog days of summer. No breakouts. A slew of niche titles, including several documentaries. This week’s standout is Sundance doc hit “Tickled” (Magnolia), which is showing some potential.

This week’s range of titles is wide and diverse. Some boast high festival and/or review pedigrees, and many come from distributors who aren’t reporting numbers (we offer estimates; “Parched,” an Indian indie from Wolfe Releasing and “2016 Sundance Film Festival Short Film Tour” remained elusive).

Meantime, “Love & Friendship” (Roadside Attractions) and “The Lobster” (A24) continue to thrive ahead of other recent releases and “Maggie’s Plan” (Sony Pictures Classics) keeps going, along with doc standout “Weiner” (IFC).

Opening

“Tickled” (Magnolia) – Metacritic: 77; Festivals include: Sundance, San Francisco, Seattle 2016

$24,000 in 2 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $12,000

After its strong reaction contending at Sundance’s World Documentary competition, this expose of the
See full article at Indiewire »

Joshua Reviews Andrzej Zulawski’s Cosmos [Theatrical Review]

Earlier this year, the film world lost one of its truly unsung icons. On February 17, director Andrzej Zulawski passed away, leaving behind not only a filmography of some of cinema’s most singular works but a critically beloved festival darling that had yet to arrive in theaters stateside. Now, beginning this weekend exclusively at The Metrograph in New York City, Zulawski’s last film is finally available to general audiences, and is without a doubt the most delightfully off-kilter picture you’re bound to see all year.

Entitled Cosmos, the picture may sound as though its eyes are set to the heavens, but with a tight runtime of just a pinch under 100 minutes, this is a ground level, if delightfully histrionic melodrama in the vein of Zulawski’s very best films. Standing as a perfect culmination of everything that made the director an auteur of entirely singular vision, Cosmos opens
See full article at CriterionCast »

Watch the trailer for Andrzej Zulawski’s Cosmos

A Us trailer has arrived online for Cosmos, the final film from late director Andrzej Zulawski. Described as a “metaphysical noir thriller”, it stars Jean-François Balmer, Sabine Azéma, Jonathan Genet, Johan Libéreau, Victória Guerra and Clémentine Pons; take a look below after the official synopsis…

The late Andrzej Zulawski’s final film, a literary adaptation suffused with his trademark freneticism, transforms Polish writer Witold Gombrowicz’s novel of the same name into an ominous and manic exploration of desire. Witold who has just failed the bar, and his companion Fuchs, who has recently quit his fashion job, are staying at a guesthouse run by the intermittently paralytic Madame Woytis. Upon discovering a sparrow hanged in the woods near the house, Witold’s reality mutates into a whirlwind of tension, histrionics, foreboding omens, and surrealistic logic as he becomes obsessed with Madame Woytis’s daughter Lena, newly married to Lucien.

Cosmos
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

U.S. Trailer for Andrzej Żuławski’s Overpowering Final Film ‘Cosmos’

2016 will be a very rich year if it offers even one other film as brazenly and convincingly out-there as Andrzej Żuławski‘s Cosmos, a melange of mysterious figures, strange events, bizarre gestures, and hilarious non-sequiturs fueled by restless temperament. Exhausting and widely entertaining, it constitutes a very fitting final transmission from one of the world’s most idiosyncratic directors.

Americans will be able to see Cosmos in just a handful of weeks — thus necessitating the release of a domestic trailer. I really do think it’s best to enter this one essentially blind, but this quick, mostly context-derived collection of moments makes for an effective preview; as I said in my review, “Almost anything can only be comprehended if seen as part of a continuum; as individual moments, they’d ring meaningless or insignificant.” You know what you’re getting and nothing is given away.

See the preview below:

Synopsis:
See full article at The Film Stage »

Exclusive: U.S. Trailer For Andrzej Zulawski’s Final Film ‘Cosmos’

Earlier this year, Polish filmmaker Andrzej Zulawski — perhaps best known for cult film favorites like “The Devil” and body horror frenzy “Possession” — passed away at the age of 75. But he left one more gift for cinephiles in “Cosmos,” and after earning acclaim on the festival circuit last year, the movie is hitting stateside cinemas, and […]

The post Exclusive: U.S. Trailer For Andrzej Zulawski’s Final Film ‘Cosmos’ appeared first on The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Power and Resistance: Andrzej Żuławski’s "On the Silver Globe"

  • MUBI
“There is in every one of us, even those who seem to be most moderate, a type of desire that is terrible, wild, and lawless.”—The Republic, Book IX 572bWhat’s the best way to describe the mania of an Andrzej Żuławski film? William Grimes, eulogizing Żuławski for The New York Times chose “emotionally savage.” J. Hoberman used “hyperkinetic,” “frenzied,” and “‘awful’ in its root sense of inspiring dread. Daniel Bird, writing about the most recent Lincoln Center screenings in New York, chose “deeply disturbing.” These descriptors make perfect sense after experiencing a Żuławski film, but I’ve never been able to sell his films to a newcomer this way. How could I? They’re much too primal for adjectives in our delicate English language, crafted to communicate Enlightenment-era ideas in a pleasing series of vibrations. The intensity of this director’s films could only be described in some sort of ancient Lovecraftian squelching,
See full article at MUBI »

Andrzej Żuławski: A Little Larger Than the Entire Universe

  • MUBI
Andrzej Żuławski. Photo by Isabelle Vautier.How does one translate into film the books by Witold Gombrowicz, who ranks among the greatest modernists of the 20th century? Few have actually dared. Whereas Peter Lilienthal’s adaptation for television of Pornografia (Die Sonne angreifen, 1971) has been all but consigned to oblivion, the famed Polish director Jerzy Skolimowski went on a 17-year hiatus following his failed adaptation of Ferdydurke (30 Door Key, 1991). However, the opposite holds true for Andrzej Żuławski, who came out of a 15-year pause to adapt for the screen Gombrowicz’s fourth novel Cosmos (1965), also his last and most complex. Unfortunately, it became a farewell work for Żuławski as well. What kind of cosmos is it? First and foremost, it’s the bizarre microcosm of a boarding house where the young writer Witold (Jonathan Genet) arrives with his friend Fuchs (Johan Libéreau) in tow to finish his novel The Haunted.
See full article at MUBI »

Review: Zulawski's Cosmos Is A Wordy Madcap Comedy That Tries To Make Sense Of It All

Andrzej Zulawski lost his battle with cancer last week, adding his name to mounting number of cultural icons who passed away this year. His death came as a shock especially to New York cinephiles, who's been waiting patiently for the chance of seeing Cosmos, his new film in 15 years, ever since it made a world premiere at Locarno Film Fest last year. When the good folks at Film Society of Lincoln Center announced the roster for this year's Film Comment Selects series, I was overjoyed that Zulawski's new film was included. Incidentally, they also added A Spotlight on Zulawski, a mini-retro consists of his digitally restored Polish films, including the seldom seen Sci-fi epic, On The Silver Globe. The good news is that Kino Lorber...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Review: Zulawski's Cosmos Is A Wordy Madcap Comedy That Tries To Make Sense Of It All

Andrzej Zulawski lost his battle with cancer last week, adding his name to mounting number of cultural icons who passed away this year. His death came as a shock especially to New York cinephiles, who's been waiting patiently for the chance of seeing Cosmos, his new film in 15 years, ever since it made a world premiere at Locarno Film Fest last year. When the good folks at Film Society of Lincoln Center announced the roster for this year's Film Comment Selects series, I was overjoyed that Zulawski's new film was included. Incidentally, they also added A Spotlight on Zulawski, a mini-retro consists of his digitally restored Polish films, including the seldom seen Sci-fi epic, On The Silver Globe. The good news is that Kino Lorber...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

The Essentials: The 5 Best Andrzej Zulawski Films

No other filmmaker fuses hysteria and contemplation like Andrzej Zulawski. The director is most often represented by his 1981 film "Possession," an emotionally fraught breakup movie in which a tentacled monster is part of a love triangle. That film has recently enjoyed a critical upswing after years as a cult favorite. He made only twelve features between 1971 and 2000, but those movies are remarkably consistent explorations of a core set of ideas about love, honestly and responsibility, the interrelated nature of personal and political lives, and the many transcendent and often terrifying ways in which emotions burst through any barrier as lives collide. Watch: New Trailer For 'Cosmos,' Andrzej Zulawski's First Film In 15 Years Just hours after the announcement that "Cosmos," his thirteenth feature and his first in fifteen years, had secured U.S. distribution, Andrzej Zulawski died due to a battle with cancer. He was 75. What was briefly a reason to.
See full article at The Playlist »
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