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Battle of the Sexes (2017)

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The true story of the 1973 tennis match between World number one Billie Jean King and ex-champ and serial hustler Bobby Riggs.

Writer:

Simon Beaufoy
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Popularity
2,617 ( 544)
Nominated for 2 Golden Globes. Another 3 wins & 17 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Emma Stone ... Billie Jean King
Steve Carell ... Bobby Riggs
Andrea Riseborough ... Marilyn Barnett
Natalie Morales ... Rosie Casals
Sarah Silverman ... Gladys Heldman
Bill Pullman ... Jack Kramer
Alan Cumming ... Cuthbert 'Ted' Tinling
Elisabeth Shue ... Priscilla Riggs
Eric Christian Olsen ... Lornie Kuhle
Fred Armisen ... Rheo Blair
Martha MacIsaac ... Jane 'Peaches' Bartkowicz
Lauren Kline Lauren Kline ... Nancy Richey
Mickey Sumner ... Valerie Ziegenfuss
Fidan Manashirova Fidan Manashirova ... Judy Tegart Dalton
Jessica McNamee ... Margaret Court
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Storyline

In the wake of the sexual revolution and the rise of the women's movement, the 1973 tennis match between women's world champion Billie Jean King (Emma Stone) and ex-men's-champ and serial hustler Bobby Riggs (Steve Carell) was billed as the BATTLE OF THE SEXES and became one of the most watched televised sports events of all time, reaching 90 million viewers around the world. As the rivalry between King and Riggs kicked into high gear, off-court each was fighting more personal and complex battles. The fiercely private King was not only championing for equality, but also struggling to come to terms with her own sexuality, as her friendship with Marilyn Barnett (Andrea Riseborough) developed. And Riggs, one of the first self-made media-age celebrities, wrestled with his gambling demons, at the expense of his family and wife Priscilla (Elisabeth Shue). Together, Billie and Bobby served up a cultural spectacle that resonated far beyond the tennis court, sparking discussions in bedrooms ... Written by Fox Searchlight Pictures

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

He made a bet. She made history.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some sexual content and partial nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

29 September 2017 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Battle of the Sexes See more »

Filming Locations:

Los Angeles, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$25,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$515,450, 24 September 2017, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$12,638,526, 21 December 2017
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | SDDS | Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film sugarcoats Billie Jean King's love affair with Marilyn Barnett. In 1981, Barnett sued King, invoking "palimony" law, and nearly destroyed King's career. It took years for King to rebuild what she'd lost. See more »

Goofs

While Billie Jean King was having an intimate relationship with Marilyn Barnett during the "Battle of the Sexes", Barnett was not a hairdresser King met by chance. Barnett was King's secretary. See more »

Quotes

TV Reporter: Miss King said she will not play for the money but, in her words, "to put women's tennis and women's lib back where it belongs. Riggs said he issued the challenge because "I want to prove that women are lousy and they don't belong on the same court as a man."
See more »

Crazy Credits

The 1930's recording of the 20th Century Fox fanfare is used on the opening Fox Searchlight logo. See more »

Connections

Features The Mary Tyler Moore Show (1970) See more »

Soundtracks

Crimson and Clover
Written by Tommy James and Peter P. Lucia Jr. (as Peter Lucia Jr.)
Performed by Tommy James & The Shondells
Courtesy of Rhino Entertainment Company
By arrangement with Warner Music Group Film & TV Licensing
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User Reviews

 
A Doll's House Re-visited, Almost
6 October 2017 | by rannynmSee all my reviews

The themes presented in this film are still relevant and have merit. With that said, I want to add that ever since Ibsen wrote "A Doll's House," it's very rare to get a film (or play for that matter) that is charged with the theme of gender equality and presents it in a way that truly resonates. What do I mean? In films that aim to give a message or present an issues, such as when the writer wants to say something about the relevant society, more often than not, the writer portrays those characters in simple categorizations of good and bad. That may work in a superhero film, but in a piece of realism, where character development and relationships are key elements to the storytelling, simple good and bad just won't do. That's my issue with this film. The screenplay simplifies a few integral characters too much, in favor of hoisting up its protagonist.

To get this out of the way, the performances are fantastic. Emma Stone and Steve Carell lead the cast well, and the cast doesn't have a weak link in it. In particular, a lot of credit has to be given to Steve Carell. He took a character that was underwritten and perhaps even misrepresented and makes him sympathetic and someone to root for. Andrea Riseborough also delivers a very affecting performance and really gives us some great scene work with Emma Stone.

The directing is swift, well paced and well filmed. Kudos to the cinematographer who really has a wonderful grasp on stillness to promote an essential moment and exerts great uses of soft and hard focus to portray dramatic moments and internalize character feelings. The editing also deserves a shout out for some wonderful pacing and really effectively switching between the grainy, 70s like cinematography and more clear cinematography.

Now, back to the screenplay. What made and still makes "A Doll's House" the ultimate gender-equality script is that every character can be sympathized with. We learn more about the human condition and evils of society, rather than placing blame and anger on individual groups. There are only two men that can be rooted for without hesitation and that's our protagonist's husband and father. Every other guy is completely unlikable and has no arc, and Steve Carell's character can be questioned. Carell's character, who is a vital part of this story, isn't written very well or thoroughly. It's always hard to have two protagonists in a film, especially at a reasonable and well paced time. Carell's character is both an antagonist and protagonist or, at least attempts to be so. Carell's character opposes Emma Stone's. It's a man versus women ordeal and their tennis match is the crisis and climax of the film. But, here's the issue. Carell's character is NOT the antagonist. It's society! So why is Carell's character's standing within the realm of the film so questionable? Why doesn't he get his own arc? Every major character in "A Doll's House" takes a journey. That's what makes us empathize with them and come away disliking their society, and not the products of that society. The same would work with this film. But instead, there is a co- protagonist / antagonist that is not written for people to care about or even empathize with. He gets no arc, no change. He's unaffected. He may as well have been a smaller part.

Why is this an issue? Because Emma Stone's character is a catalyst. She's the driving force and vehicle used within the film to represent the affects of an unjust era and to showcase the positive effects that a change in this society would have. Unfortunately, because Carell's character and the real antagonists (the sexists who sit atop the societal ladder) don't change, because we only see them as unlikable, this story turns into something simple and ultimately un-fulfilling. Stone's character merely wins the battle within the film and we come away knowing that and are momentarily happy. However, that soon goes away, which makes this entertaining dramedy perhaps a little forgettable. Had the writing been more substantial and caring to all its characters, and forgiving to all its characters and condemned society instead, we'd come away with a more profound understanding of where issues lie and are issued from. That's a memorable film. I suppose the cinematic world is still chasing Ibsen.

I give this film 3 out of 5 stars for its entertainment value and performances and recommend it for ages 13 to 18. Reviewed by Willie J., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic.


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