Zero Days (2016) - News Poster

(2016)

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Alex Gibney Announces Documentary About Saudi-u.S. Relations

Alex Gibney Announces Documentary About Saudi-u.S. Relations
A new documentary with the working title of House of Saud, helmed by filmmaker Alex Gibney and author Lawrence Wright will examine the United States’ tenuous relationship with Saudi Arabia. Showtime announced Monday that the film was in development but did not announce a projected premiere date.

The film will attempt to make sense of how the White House works with the Saudi royal family, beginning with the murder of Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi and the way the Trump administration seemed to walked on eggshells when it came to implicating Saudis.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

The Verdict Is In: ‘Rbg’ Will Rule Limited-Release Debuts This Weekend: Specialty Preview

The Magnolia Pictures-Participant Media documentary Rbg already has lured crowds with targeted buyout screenings and looks ready for a strong debut as it begins its regular run in theaters this weekend. Julie Cohen and Betsy West’s Sundance premiere about U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is opening Friday in nearly three dozen locations, ready to peel off some audiences looking for an alternative to the second weekend of Avengers: Infinity War and other big holdovers. New limited releases this weekend also include foreign-language fare. Music Box Films is opening The Guardians, a drama starring Nathalie Baye from French filmmaker Xavier Beauvois that begins its stateside run with an exclusive showing in New York this weekend before heading to select markets. And KimStim is opening Vivian Qu’s Angels Wear White at New York’s Metrograph before heading to other cities. The film was the only feature
See full article at Deadline »

Will Bates (‘The Looming Tower’ composer) on the pressure of scoring Hulu series about 9/11 attacks we ‘all lived through’ [Exclusive Video Interview]

Will Bates (‘The Looming Tower’ composer) on the pressure of scoring Hulu series about 9/11 attacks we ‘all lived through’ [Exclusive Video Interview]
Composer Will Bates knew from the get-go that scoring “The Looming Tower” would be a daunting task. “It seemed kind of clear that of all the things that I’ve worked on, this was going to be the largest in terms of the scope of work and the level of detail that it really needed,” he reveals. Based on Lawrence Wright‘s Pulitzer Prize-winning nonfiction book, this Hulu limited series starring Jeff Daniels, Peter Sarsgaard, Michael Stuhlbarg and Bill Camp recounts the events leading up to the al-Qaeda terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. Bates knew he had his work cut out for him because 9/11 is “something that, to some extent, all of us have lived through.”

See Jeff Daniels (‘The Looming Tower’) wonders, did we learn anything from 9/11, ‘or are we more divided than ever?’ [Exclusive Video Interview]

Upon reading the book, Bates was struck by “how huge this subject is.” The story takes us around the globe,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Netflix’s ‘Dirty Money’ Explores Greed and the Root of All Evil in the First Trailer

Hey, do you need another incredibly infuriating thing to add to your life? Great! Because Netflix's new documentary series Dirty Money just released its first incredibly frustrating trailer (unless you belong to the 1%, of course). Alex Gibney, the Oscar-winning director behind such explosive documentaries as Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room, Zero Days, and Going Clear: Scientology & the Prison of Belief, to name just a few, is the mind behind this exploration of corporate greed, corruption, and the legal loopholes that keep the immoral and the amoral out of jail and in the black. This …
See full article at Collider.com »

‘Zero Days’ Helmer Alex Gibney On Stuxnet, The Piece Of Malware That Launched A New Era Of Cyber Warfare

Though a veil of secrecy still hangs over the subject of Alex Gibney’s timely Showtime documentary, Zero Days, it is now generally acknowledged that in the mid-to-late 2000s, the United States and Israel jointly developed Stuxnet, one of the most elegant, ingenious and terrifying pieces of malware ever created, which was used to sabotage Iran’s nuclear program. Stuxnet was designed as an invisible tool for covert operations, which would aid in sabotaging Iran’s nuclear…
See full article at Deadline TV »

‘Zero Days’ Helmer Alex Gibney On Stuxnet, The Piece Of Malware That Launched A New Era Of Cyber Warfare

‘Zero Days’ Helmer Alex Gibney On Stuxnet, The Piece Of Malware That Launched A New Era Of Cyber Warfare
Though a veil of secrecy still hangs over the subject of Alex Gibney’s timely Showtime documentary, Zero Days, it is now generally acknowledged that in the mid-to-late 2000s, the United States and Israel jointly developed Stuxnet, one of the most elegant, ingenious and terrifying pieces of malware ever created, which was used to sabotage Iran’s nuclear program. Stuxnet was designed as an invisible tool for covert operations, which would aid in sabotaging Iran’s nuclear…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

2016’s films ranked

04.27.17: This list is now final. While I may in the future see additional films that were released in the awards year of 2016, no more films will be added to this list. (I may add links to reviews of films listed here.)

This ranking includes only new theatrical releases viewed for the awards year of 2016 (for eligibility for the Academy Awards and the Ofcs and Awfj awards); some films released in the UK without Us releases (and so ineligible for those awards this year) may also be included, for my own bookkeeping purposes. Links go to my review. Numbers after each entry are Date First Viewed/NYC Release Date/London Release Date; year is 2016 unless otherwise noted.

worth paying multiplex prices for

[5 stars]

Arrival (10.10/11.11/11.10)

La La Land (10.07/12.09/01.13.17)

A Monster Calls (10.06/12.23/01.01.17)

The Lobster (07.16.15/05.13/10.16.15)

Zootropolis (aka Zootopia) (02.22/03.04/03.25)

A Bigger Splash (10.08.15/05.04/02.12)

Miss Sloane (11.20/11.25/05.12.17)

London Road (06.03.15/09.09/06.12.15)

The Girl with All the Gifts (07.26/02.24.17/09.23)

I, Daniel Blake
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Newswire: 13th, O.J.: Made In America top this year’s Peabody documentary winners

It’s a good day for pretty much everybody in the documentary business, as the winners of this year’s batch of documentary Peabody Awards come from a wide array of studios and filmmakers. This comes from Deadline, which reports that the biggest names in the list are Ava DuVernay’s American criminal-justice system deconstruction 13th, Espn’s Oscar-winning O.J. Simpson film O.J.: Made In America, and Alex Gibney’s cyber warfare-based political thriller Zero Days. There are also two Frontline specials from PBS, two non-Frontline specials from PBS, HBO’s Mavis Staples doc Mavis!, and Audrie & Daisy and Hip-Hop Evolution from Netflix.

The winners of the other entertainment Peabody Awards will be announced later this week, and you can see the full list of documentary winners below.

2017 Peabody Award Documentary Winners

Audrie & Daisy

4.1 Miles

Frontline: “Confronting Isis”

Frontline: “Exodus”

Hip-Hop Evolution ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Peabody Awards: ‘O.J.: Made In America, ‘13th’, ‘Zero Days’ Among Documentary Winners

Oscar winner O.J.: Made In America, Ava DuVernay’s criminal justice docu 13th and Alex Gibney’s cyber warfare pic Zero Days are among the 12 winners of Peabody Awards for documentaries. PBS scored four of the 12 spots, with Frontline pieces on Isis and the refugee crisis, Independent Lens: Trapped and Pov: Hooligan Sparrow. Netflix, which has ramped up its documentary slate considerably in the past year, has three titles on the list: Audrie & Daisy, DuVernay’s…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Peabody Awards: ‘O.J.: Made In America, ‘13th’, ‘Zero Days’ Among Documentary Winners

Peabody Awards: ‘O.J.: Made In America, ‘13th’, ‘Zero Days’ Among Documentary Winners
Oscar winner O.J.: Made In America, Ava DuVernay’s criminal justice docu 13th and Alex Gibney’s cyber warfare pic Zero Days are among the 12 winners of Peabody Awards for documentaries. PBS scored four of the 12 spots, with Frontline pieces on Isis and the refugee crisis, Independent Lens: Trapped and Pov: Hooligan Sparrow. Netflix, which has ramped up its documentary slate considerably in the past year, has three titles on the list: Audrie & Daisy, DuVernay’s…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

‘Get Me Roger Stone’ Trailer: Netflix Documentary Explores the Career of the Infamous Trump Advisor

‘Get Me Roger Stone’ Trailer: Netflix Documentary Explores the Career of the Infamous Trump Advisor
Netflix has released the trailer for its upcoming original documentary “Get Me Roger Stone.” The film explores the life and career of the longtime Donald Trump advisor, who helped launch his political run.

Read More: Sarah Paulson Nominates Herself to Play Donald Trump in New Season of ‘American Horror Story

“Get Me Roger Stone” features interviews with the infamous political strategist and self-proclaimed “agent provacateur,” as well as with people who have followed and studied his career. The documentary explores the career of the man who sports a tattoo of President Nixon in his back as a badge of honor.

“Those who say I have no soul, those who say I have no principles are losers,” Stone says in the trailer, sounding a lot like Trump. “Those are bitter losers.”

Read More: Writers Guild Negotiations: If Talk Shows Go Dark, Donald Trump Could Be The Biggest Winner in a Strike
See full article at Indiewire »

WGA winners include “Arrival” and “Moonlight”

Yesterday evening, the Writers Guild of America handed out their awards, marking one of the season’s final precursor stops and last guild ceremony. As with many of the guilds this year, a slight curveball was tossed our way, namely in that one potential frontrunner is nominated in a different category at Oscar. You’ll see what I mean shortly, along with a few other precursors that went down over the weekend. Ballots for the Academy Awards are due by tomorrow, so voters are making their final decisions literally as you read this. It’s very much the moment of truth, with the results of it all less than a week away now… Below you will see not just the WGA winners, but also the Cinema Audio Society, which basically predict Best Sound Mixing at the Oscars, as well as the victors from the Makeup Artists and Hair Stylists guild.
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

2017 Writers Guild Awards Winners: ‘Moonlight,’ ‘Arrival,’ ‘Atlanta’ and ‘The Americans’ Win Big

2017 Writers Guild Awards Winners: ‘Moonlight,’ ‘Arrival,’ ‘Atlanta’ and ‘The Americans’ Win Big
Live from New York! And also Los Angeles! It’s the 2017 Writers Guild Awards, honoring the best in writing for television, film and new media. This year’s big winners included some of the season’s most lauded productions — including “Moonlight,” “Arrival,” “Atlanta” and “The Americans.”

While “Moonlight” and “Arrival” will compete against each other in the Adapted Screenplay category at the Oscars, they were entered in the WGA Awards in different categories, allowing both to make off with an award. “The Americans” pulled out a win for Drama Series, while “Atlanta” snapped up both Comedy Series and New Series. Other winners included “Command and Control,” “Saturday Night Live,” “BoJack Horseman” and “This Is Us.”

Read More: The IndieWire 2016-17 Awards Season Winners Guide

Check out our full list of winners — noted in bold — all updated live as the awards were announced at concurrent ceremonies in New York and Los Angeles this evening.
See full article at Indiewire »

Which Documentaries Help Make Sense of the World Today? — IndieWire Critics Survey

  • Indiewire
Which Documentaries Help Make Sense of the World Today? — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: This past Friday saw the release of Raoul Peck’s “I Am Not Your Negro,” a documentary that speaks to our present moment through the writings and actions of the late James Baldwin. What other documentaries — recent or not — might help people better understand and / or respond to the state of the world today?

Richard Brody (@tnyfrontrow), The New Yorker

“The state of the world today” is too big a matter for any one documentary, because there’s no one state of things, there’s an overwhelming diversity of experiences — and the history of movies is as much the history of the ones that it doesn’t show.
See full article at Indiewire »

Vr In the Real World: How an Emerging Technology Could Change the World

Vr In the Real World: How an Emerging Technology Could Change the World
The Sundance Film Festival has long included documentaries that tackle hot button issues, but this year some of those films included virtual reality companion pieces in the New Frontier section. In addition to longstanding issues regarding technical, ethical and narrative complexities of telling stories with new technologies, these Vr additions raised serious questions about the capacity for the medium as an agent of change.

Environmental issues were at the forefront of this year’s festival, and two of the most prominent climate documentaries, “An Inconvenient Sequel” and “Chasing Coral,” presented Vr shorts as well. “An Inconvenient Sequel” shows how grave the climate change crisis has become since Al Gore’s “An Inconvenient Truth” debuted a decade ago. In the companion piece, “Melting Ice,” Gore and the film’s creator Danfung Dennis take us on a 360-degree tour of how rising temperatures have wreaked havoc on the climate of Greenland.

The
See full article at Indiewire »

Kneejerk Reactions To The Oscar Nominations And The Final Word On 2017

Even when you live in Los Angeles, as I do, if you’re not in the network of critics groups and press screening and screener DVDs it can be a challenge to keep up with everything you tell yourself you have to see before attempting an informed roundup of the year currently in the rearview mirror. And I also try to not let more than a couple of weeks of the new year go by before checking in, regardless of how many of the year’s big presents I have left to unwrap, though in past years I have not lived well by this dictum—let’s just say that if I’m still posting stuff on the year’s best after even Oscar has thoroughly chewed over the goods, as has happened in the past, well, I’ve overstayed my welcome.

2016 was, in most ways, a disaster of a year,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Doc Corner: The Non-Fiction Class of 2016

This year’s Oscar race for Best Documentary Feature was a fiercely competitive one. With the strength of the 15-wide finalists list, quite frankly, it would have been hard to give us a truly bad line-up. We particularly weep for the omissions of Cameraperson, Tower, Zero Days and Weiner, but personal grouching aside about a couple of the nominees, this year’s batch is quite something. We have three films about race (one with queer undertones), a foreign language title, and the longest film ever nominated for an Academy Award.

The nominees are:

• Fire at Sea (Gianfranco Rosi, Donatella Palermo)

I Am Not Your Negro (Raoul Peck, Rémi Grellety, Hébert Peck)

O.J.: Made in America (Ezra Edelman, Caroline Waterlow)

• Life, Animated (Roger Ross Williams, Julie Goldman)

• 13th (Ava DuVernay, Spencer Averick, Howard Barish)

We will be looking at the documentary short nominees later (I have one title left to watch,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Braving Chernobyl for Oscar-Shortlisted Post-Apocalyptic Short ‘Graffiti’ — Watch

Braving Chernobyl for Oscar-Shortlisted Post-Apocalyptic Short ‘Graffiti’ — Watch
It sounds inconceivable that the first high quality footage to come out of the Chernobyl nuclear accident site was shot by a crew of Spaniards. But that’s exactly how “Graffiti,” Participant Media’s Oscar entry for live-action short, got made.

The notorious nuclear disaster occurred in the now-abandoned town of Pripyat, Ukraine, which was the perfect setting for the post-apocalyptic drama about a man who fills his days tagging walls with graffiti and discovers he might not be as alone as he thought. Empty pools, dilapidated ferris wheels, and hollowed out Brutalist buildings provide a stunning backdrop for the messages he exchanges with a companion he never sees.

Read More: ‘Zero Days’: How the World Caught Up with Alex Gibney’s Oscar-Shortlisted Cyberwarfare Documentary

In a behind-the-scenes feature, Spanish director Lluis Quilez (“Out of the Dark”) explains how the intrepid crew surmounted understandable reservations to document the bleak and snowy town.
See full article at Indiewire »

Tori Amos and ‘Flicker’: How She Hunted Down That Song For ‘Audrie & Daisy’

Tori Amos and ‘Flicker’: How She Hunted Down That Song For ‘Audrie & Daisy’
Tori Amos has been composing since the age of five, but she’s never written a song like this. “Flicker” runs over the credits of Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk’s “Audrie & Daisy,” the Netflix documentary that documents three teenage girls’ experience with rape and the cyberbullying that followed.

It’s a searing original composition, one that addresses a topic that deeply resonates with the longtime Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network spokesperson, and is now considered a favorite for an Oscar nomination. How do you write a piece like this? As she said, “You have to be a fucking hunter and hunt that frequency down.” Here’s what it’s like to be on that hunt.

Anne Thompson: How did you come to write the song for Netflix documentary “Audrie & Daisy”?

Tori Amos: Netflix got in touch with me. And they wanted to know if I would watch a
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Water & Power: A California Heist’ Trailer: Sundance-Bound Documentary Is Like a Nonfiction ‘Chinatown’

  • Indiewire
“Forget it, Jake. It’s Water & Power” is probably never said aloud in the Sundance-bound documentary “Water & Power: A California Heist,” but that doesn’t mean you should dismiss Marina Zenovich’s film outright. Zenovich, who previously directed “Roman Polanski: Wanted and Desired,” tells the Hollywood Reporter that Polanski’s 1974 neo-noir is one of her favorite movies in part because she loves “that world of greed and the lengths people will go to get what they want.” Watch the trailer for “Water & Power” below.

Read More: ‘Night Shift’ Trailer: Viola Davis-Produced Short Starring Tunde Adebimpe Goes Inside Strange World of Night Club Attendants

“The hunger for water is never-ending,” she tells THR of the research that went into her film. “There are too many people wanting a precious resource that people are trying to privatize. So this film is like a wake-up call for that. I didn’t know what I would find,
See full article at Indiewire »
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