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Whose Streets? (2017)

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Whose Streets? is an unflinching look at how the police killing of 18-year-old Mike Brown inspired a community to fight back and sparked a global movement.

Directors:

Sabaah Folayan, Damon Davis (co-director)

Writer:

Sabaah Folayan
2 wins & 18 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Lezley McSpadden Lezley McSpadden ... Herself - Mother of Mike Brown Jr.
Michael Brown Sr. Michael Brown Sr. ... Himself - Father of Mike Brown Jr.
David Whitt David Whitt ... Himself
Montague Simmons Montague Simmons ... Himself
Jamala Jamala ... Herself
Ashley Yates Ashley Yates ... Herself
Anthony Shadid Anthony Shadid ... Himself (as Brother Shadid)
Kayla Reed Kayla Reed ... Herself
T-Dubb-O T-Dubb-O ... Himself
Catherine Daniels Catherine Daniels ... Herself (as Mama Cat)
Tef Poe Tef Poe ... Himself
Brittany Ferrell Brittany Ferrell ... Herself
Kenna Ferrell Kenna Ferrell ... Herself
Thomas Jackson Thomas Jackson ... Himself - Ferguson Police Chief (archive footage)
Bassem Masri Bassem Masri ... Himself
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Storyline

Whose Streets? is an unflinching look at how the police killing of 18-year-old Mike Brown inspired a community to fight back and sparked a global movement.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

We will not go quietly See more »

Genres:

Documentary

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language throughout | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

11 August 2017 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Whose Streets? See more »

Filming Locations:

Ferguson, Missouri, USA See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$43,804, 13 August 2017

Gross USA:

$182,799

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$182,799
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Magnolia Pictures See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color (HDCAM)| Color
See full technical specs »

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User Reviews

Powerful doc dedicated to the power of the people.
11 September 2017 | by jdesandoSee all my reviews

"A riot is the language of the unheard." chapter heading

Having never participated in a protest, much less a riot, I felt I had done both after experiencing directors Sabaah Folay and Damon Davis's Whose Streets? Their documentary about Ferguson, Missouri, and the death of Mike Brown in 2014 is an unremittingly real and passionate participant point of view that celebrates the will of an oppressed people to be heard.

Whose Streets? documents the thoughts and actions of the largely black population as they experience the white-cop brutality of Ferguson and St. Louis police forces, culminating in Mike Brown's being shot 8 times by an officer who justifies the assassination with his fear. The grand jury believed he was faultless, leading to disbelief and riots reminiscent of the reaction to Rodney King's killers' exoneration.

The doc is especially effective bringing home the pain with portraits of such sufferers as Brittany Ferrell, a comely and articulate young lesbian who is not afraid to speak her outrage. We see her at home with her children and on the street with the microphone chanting the will to fight to be free, an anthem echoed by virtually everyone facing down the daunting police and national guard forces.

The street's-eye view happens largely because cell phones recorded the abuse with a probing expertise heretofore only the province of professional filmmakers. But not today, when those little devices are adjuncts to the spirit of justice, albeit not always enough to bring convictions. David Whitt, a Copwatch citizen videographer, meticulously records and publishes images that damn the militaristic response, for the film's expert doc makers put them together to devastatingly powerful effect.

Although white cop Darren Wilson, 28, had Brown in his sights after Brown allegedly robbed a convenience store, Brown should not have died for the crime nor should his body have lain in the street for hours while the community and security reacted. However, most of the forensic evidence and testimony proved that Wilson acted in self defense.

If there can be a criticism of this doc, it would be that the evidence finally exonerating Wilson is not presented; he remains guilty in the spirit of the film if not the reality. Although the filmmakers could claim an interest only in the people's plight and reactions, full disclosure for me requires that I also see where the police can be at least partially exonerated.

Justice both civil and spiritual is elusive. Whose Streets? is an estimable rendition of a disadvantaged populace struggling to be heard.


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