Diamantino (2018) - News Poster

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Charades Launches ‘Madeleine Collins,’ ‘Felicita,’ ‘The Speech’ at UniFrance Rendez-Vous Market (Exclusive)

  • Variety
Charades Launches ‘Madeleine Collins,’ ‘Felicita,’ ‘The Speech’ at UniFrance Rendez-Vous Market (Exclusive)
Charades, the sales company behind the Oscar-nominated animated film “I Lost My Body,” has boarded three new French films, “Madeleine Collins” with Virginie Efira, as well as the comedies “Felicita” and “The Speech.”

Charades will be introducing the three titles at the UniFrance Rendez-Vous with French Cinema, an industry showcase of local movies kicking off on Jan. 16.

“Madeleine Collins” is a psychological drama directed by Antoine Barraud and headlined by Efira, the popular Belgian actress of Justine Triet’s “Victoria” and “Sibyl,” as well as Paul Verhoeven’s anticipated “Benedetta.”

Efira (pictured) stars in “Madeleine Collins” as Judith who leads a double life between Switzerland and France. In one country, she lives with Abdel with whom she raises a little girl, and in another country she lives with Melvil with whom she has two older boys. Judith gets slowly embroiled in a web of lies and secrets, leading her balancing act to explode dangerously.
See full article at Variety »

Word of Mouth: “audience members give me tips on new films that are shot without gender bias”

Word of Mouth: “audience members give me tips on new films that are shot without gender bias”
The Los Angeles filmmaker Nina Menkes, a recipient of the lifetime achievement award at Mar del Plata film festival, reveals who she trusts with film recommendations.

Since my job is teaching film at California Institute of the Arts, that’s the only thing we talk about. I trust my colleagues for recommendations — they are usually right. Bérénice Reynaud, James Benning, Pia Borg, Lee Anne Schmitt as well as UCLA Film & Television programmer Kj Relth and Academy Film Archive preservationist Mark Toscano, to name a few. I also listen to my students for film tips as they are sometimes more up
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Welcome to the 2020 Theatrical Experience: Threatened By Streaming, and Impossible to Replace

Welcome to the 2020 Theatrical Experience: Threatened By Streaming, and Impossible to Replace
Movies faced dramatic changes in the last 10 years, ranging from franchise domination to renewed conversations about diversity. However, no industry anxiety percolated more than questions about the future of the theatrical experience. While Disney mastered the blockbuster tentpole, and foreign-language breakout “Parasite” proved that theatrical success can happen for a range of cinematic achievements, the first decade following the launch of the smartphone and global streaming services made it clear: The existential threat to theatrical is very real.

We begin 2020 knowing that theatrical is not a given when it comes to movies; it’s simply one platform that must compete with all the others. Maintaining its relevance requires conscious choice as well as hard evidence to support its ongoing appeal.

Praise for the theatrical experience tends to stem from nostalgic fixations, but it’s one borne out of real-world experience. In June, I watched Noah Baumbach’s gripping and heartfelt divorce drama,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Best Scores & Soundtracks of 2019

As Martin Scorsese once said, “Music and cinema fit together naturally. Because there’s a kind of intrinsic musicality to the way moving images work when they’re put together. It’s been said that cinema and music are very close as art forms, and I think that’s true.” Indeed, the right piece of music–whether it’s an original score or a carefully selected song–can do wonders for a sequence, and today we’re looking at the 20 films that best expressed this notion this year.

From seasoned composers to accomplished musicians, as well as a smattering of soundtracks, each musical example perfectly transported us to the world of the film. Check out our rundown of the top 20, which includes streams to each soundtrack in full where available.

20. Climax (Various Artists)

19. August at Akiko’s (Alex Zhang Hungtai)

18. The Last Black Man in San Francisco (Emile Mosseri)

17. An Elephant Sitting Still
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Best Films of 2019, According to IndieWire’s Staff

  • Indiewire
The Best Films of 2019, According to IndieWire’s Staff
Over the course of a single year, the staff of IndieWire consumes a dizzying amount of films, thanks to packed film festival slates, stuffed streaming offerings, and regular old theatrical releases. Along the way, we find plenty of films to love, and closing out another year at the movies gives us a chance to keep spreading the good word of the year’s best (at least in our eyes).

For those of you obsessed with numbers, IndieWire’s overall top five film picks likely don’t surprise: Bong Joon Ho’s “Parasite” was the clear favorite, but it was followed by an array of darlings, including Celine Sciamma’s “Portrait of a Lady on Fire,” the Safdie brothers’ “Uncut Gems,” Greta Gerwig’s “Little Women,” and Martin Scorsese’s “The Irishman.” And while those top favorites appeared on a number of lists, a few films only appeared on one, including
See full article at Indiewire »

The 25 Best Movie Moments of 2019

  • Indiewire
The 25 Best Movie Moments of 2019
If the best films of 2019 have anything in common, it’s that they each feel somehow emblematic of the decade that they closed. Following on the heels of “Silence” and “The Wolf of Wall Street,” Martin Scorsese delivered another morally ambiguous period epic about the weight of our sins. Less than three years after looking for “The Lost City of Z,” James Gray shot the moon with “Ad Astra,” his greatest movie about the search for a mythic place to make us whole.

After establishing her extraordinary talents with the likes of “Tomboy” and “Girlhood,” “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” auteur Céline Sciamma rocked Cannes with her most shattering tale of love and loss and self-discovery, and capped off a remarkable decade of gay screen romances in the process. Bong Joon Ho, never capitalism’s biggest cheerleader, weaponized his usual proclivities in a way that saw him become a genre unto himself.
See full article at Indiewire »

The Arcs Festival Taps Isabelle Huppert to Head The Talent Village For Young Helmers

  • Variety
The Arcs Festival Taps Isabelle Huppert to Head The Talent Village For Young Helmers
Guillaume Nicloux, the French director of “Valley of Love,” is set to preside over the jury of the Arcs Film Festival, while the iconic French actress Isabelle Huppert (“Elle”) will be the patron of the second edition of the Talent Village.

Created last year, the Talent Village is a development workshop and platform for emerging talents aimed at helping them make their feature debut. Huppert will succeed to Danish director Thomas Vinterberg (“The Hunt”) who was the patron of the inaugural edition.

The festival, which celebrated its 10th anniversary last year, will also launch the Cinema Green Lab. Along the lines of its workshop program and award for women filmmakers, the Arcs festival will be hosting screenings of environment-themed movies, workshops discussing eco-friendly initiatives in the film industry, as well as panel discussions about ways to tackle these topics in fiction.

The Arcs fest will also hand out an award
See full article at Variety »

French Animation ‘I Lost My Body’ Tops Cannes Critics’ Week Winners

French Animation ‘I Lost My Body’ Tops Cannes Critics’ Week Winners
“I Lost My Body,” a dark French animated film from writer-director Jérémy Clapin, has come up trumps in this year’s Critics’ Week program at the Cannes Film Festival, taking the strand’s top honor, the Nespresso Grand Prize. The film, which follows a young man’s severed hand as it struggles to be reunited with its own, was a critical favorite in the section, standing out for its blend of morbid humor and touching drama — and of course for being the only toon in an otherwise live-action selection.

Oscar-nominated “Amélie” screenwriter Guillaume Laurant also had a hand in the film, so to speak, which Clapin — whose short film “Skhizein” also won a Critics’ Week prize in 2008 — described to Variety earlier this week as “a kind of love story.” “I Lost My Body,” his first feature, will travel on to the Annecy fest as it seeks international distribution.

Other Critics
See full article at Variety »

Portugal’s Film Industry Gets a Funding Boost

  • Variety
Portugal’s Film Industry Gets a Funding Boost
Despite producing only around 15 feature films per year, Portuguese cinema has consistently won significant festival prizes.

In 2018, awards for Portuguese films included Cannes’ Critics’ Week winner, “Diamantino” by Gabriel Abrantes and Daniel Schmidt, and “The Dead and the Others” by João Salaviza and Renée Nader Messora, which took a Special Jury Prize at Cannes’ Un Certain Regard.

Portuguese filmmakers have survived through a mixture of dedication, creative ingenuity and co-productions. Amid economic crisis, in 2012, the situation seemed dire, with Portugal’s National Film and Audiovisual Institute (Ica) unable to open any funding lines.

However a 2012 film law, revised in 2014, provided new revenues for the Ica by introducing levies on subscription TV services. As a result, the Ica has been able to channel significant additional funding into the domestic industry, including new support programs for TV series and animation features.

Investment obligations for domestic broadcasters have also been upped including reinforced commitments for public broadcaster,
See full article at Variety »

‘Other People,’ ‘Rascal’ Win Les Arcs Festival’s Arte Kino Prize

  • Variety
‘Other People,’ ‘Rascal’ Win Les Arcs Festival’s Arte Kino Prize
Aleksandra Terpinska’s “Other People” and Peter Dourountzis’s “Rascal” won the inaugural Arte Kino International Prize at the 10th edition of Les Arcs Film Festival’s Co-Production Village.

The award was given by Remi Burah, who runs Arte France Cinéma and launched in 2016 ArteKino Festival, a European online festival in partnership with the digital service Festival Scope. Each “Other People” and “Rascal” will receive 2000 Euros.

Mixing comedy, drama and musical, “Other People” tells the story of a man who lives with his mum and teenage sister who starts a romance with Iwona, a woman in her early 40’s who cannot cope with her marriage. “Other People” was selected as part of this year’s focus on Poland. Terpinska’s last short “The Best Fireworks Ever” premiered at Cannes’s Critics’ Week and won two awards.

Meanwhile, “Rascal” in a French-language thriller following a charming young man who arrives in
See full article at Variety »

‘System Crasher,’ ‘White on White’ Win Work-in-Progress Awards at Les Arcs

  • Variety
‘System Crasher,’ ‘White on White’ Win Work-in-Progress Awards at Les Arcs
Nora Fingscheidt’s “System Crasher” and Theo Court’s “White on White” won the top prizes at Les Arcs Film Festival’s Work-in-Progress session. Both titles were among the 18 films in post-production pitched during the 10th edition of the Work-in-Progress showcase which is spearheaded by Frederic Boyer, the artistic director of Les Arcs and Tribeca festivals.

“System Crasher,” which won the TitraFilm Award, follows the wild journey of a 9-year-old girl through all possible stations of Child Protective Services. “System Crasher” is produced by Weydemann Bros and Kineo Filmprodudktion, and co-produced by Oma Inge Film.

The jury, which included Gaia Furrer, the head of programming for Venice Days, Trevor Groth from 30West and Alex Traila, the head of Romanian international affairs Sarajevo Cinelink, praised “System Crasher” for its “electrifying portrait of an issue that affects cultures around the world.” “(It) isn’t of­ ten shown, and is done so through
See full article at Variety »

2018 European Film Awards: Red-hot ‘Cold War’ wins 5 on way to Oscars

2018 European Film Awards: Red-hot ‘Cold War’ wins 5 on way to Oscars
Pawel Pawlikowski’s “”Cold War” swept the European Film Academy Awards on Saturday, winning five of its bids: Best Picture, Director, Actress (Joanna Kulig), Screenplay and Film Editing. This Polish picture contended for the top prize against three other films that are also entered in this year’s Oscar race for Foreign-Language Film — Sweden’s “Border,” Poland’s “Cold War,” Italy’s “Dogman” and Belgium’s “Girl.” The fifth nominee was “Happy as Lazzaro,” which is also from Italy.

Winners of the 31st edition of these awards were decided by the 3,000 plus members of the academy, drawn from all parts of Europe. Scroll down to see all the winners (and nominees).

Last year Ruben Ostlund‘s satire “The Square” swept the EFAs with six wins including both Best Picture and Best Comedy. Ostlund claimed both the writing and directing awards for his savage satire set in the high stakes art
See full article at Gold Derby »

Les Arcs’s Co-Production Village Kicks Off 10th Edition

  • Variety
Marylise Dumont’s “Black Dog,” Jonas Matzow Gulbrandsen’s “Ashes and Snow” and “Each of Us” are among the 20 projects which will be pitched at the 10th edition of Les Arcs Film Festival’s Co-Production Village.

The Co-Production Village will run alongside the festival which will be presided by Ruben Ostlund, the Swedish helmer of Palme d’Or-winning and Oscar-nominated “The Square,” and will open on Dec. 15 with Louis Garrel’s “A Faithful Man.” The movie will compete along with nine films selected by Frederic Boyer, the artistic director of both Les Arcs and Tribeca festivals.

Besides Ostlund, a flurry of high-profile European filmmakers, industry figures and talent are expected to attend the festival, notably Laetitia Casta (“A Faitful Man”), Alex Lutz (“Guy”), Lukas Dhont (“Girl”), Charlotte Le Bon (“The Promise”), Jeremie Renier (“Double Lover”), Valeria Bruni Tedeschi (“Les estivants”), Romain Duris (“Heartbreaker”), Camille Cottin (“Call My Agent!), and Thomas Vinterberg
See full article at Variety »

2018 European Film Awards nominations: Red-hot ‘Cold War’ leads on way to Oscars

2018 European Film Awards nominations: Red-hot ‘Cold War’ leads on way to Oscars
Nominations for the European Film Academy Award were announced on Saturday (Nov. 10) at the Seville film festival in Spain. Four of the entries in this year’s Oscar race for Foreign-Language Film — Sweden’s “Border,” Poland’s “Cold War,” Italy’s “Dogman” and Belgium’s “Girl” — are up for Best Picture. The fifth nominee is “Happy as Lazzaro” from Germany (which submitted “Never Look Away” at the Oscars).

Pawel Pawlikowski’s “Cold War” leads with five nominations: Best Picture, Director, Actor (Tomasz Kot), Actress (Joanna Kulig) and Screenplay. “Dogman” and “Border” have four nominations apiece as does “Happy as Lazzaro.”

Winners of the 31st edition of these awards will be decided by the 3,000 plus members of the academy, drawn from all parts of Europe. The ceremony is scheduled for Dec. 15 in Seville.

Last year Ruben Ostlund‘s satire “The Square” swept the EFAs with six wins including both Best Picture and Best Comedy.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Macao Film Festival 2018 unveils full line-up for third edition

Macao Film Festival 2018 unveils full line-up for third edition
Peter Farrelly’s Oscar-tipped Green Book will open the festival.

Peter Farrelly’s Green Book will open the third edition of the International Film Festival and Awards Macao (Iffam), which also unveiled its full line-up at a press conference in Macau today.

The international competition for first and second-time filmmakers will screen 11 films, including China’s Suburban Birds, India’s The Man Who Feels No Pain and Japan’s Jesus (see full line-up below). The best film in the international competition will receive a cash prize of $60,000.

As previously announced, Chinese director Chen Kaige is heading the competition jury.

This
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘Diamantino’ Review: A Surrealist Celebrity Romp About… Everything? [Nyff]

‘Diamantino’ Review: A Surrealist Celebrity Romp About… Everything? [Nyff]
The New York Film Festival’s Projections section is filled to the brim with the avant-garde, and this year’s lineup is no exception. Tsai Ming-liang’s Your Face is composed entirely of silent close-ups, while Albert Serra’s Roi Soleil is an hour of King Louis Xiv moaning and writhing. The former feels like a museum exhibit; the […]

The post ‘Diamantino’ Review: A Surrealist Celebrity Romp About… Everything? [Nyff] appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

‘Diamantino’ Review: Wildly Entertaining Portuguese Spoof About Giant Puppies and Soccer Stars Is Movie the World Needs Now

“Diamantino” is nothing less (and so much more) than the movie the world needs right now. Co-directed by Gabriel Abrantes and Daniel Schmidt, this winningly demented 21st century fairy tale centers on a beautiful, child-like soccer phenom named Diamantino who reacts to a devastating World Cup loss by adopting a Mozambican refugee who claims to be a teen boy but is actually an adult lesbian on an undercover mission from the Portuguese government to investigate a money-laundering operation run by the athlete’s evil twin sisters. Also, there’s a mad scientist who’s trying to clone Diamantino in order to create an invincible super team capable of stoking national pride and “Making Portugal Great Again.” Also, there are giant puppies. A lot of them. A litter of Pekingese the size of double-decker buses. And that’s just the basic set-up.

Unfolding like a blissful cross between Guy Maddin’s
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Birds of Passage’ to Open Miami Film Festival’s Gems Event

  • Variety
The Miami Film Festival’s fall edition, called Gems, has unveiled its lineup including Colombia’s Oscar entry “Birds of Passage” as opening night selection and Spain’s Oscar submission “Champions” as closing night film.

Miami Dade College organizes the festival, which takes place Oct. 11-14 at the college’s Tower Theater Miami. The Miami Film Festival’s 36th edition will run March 1-10, 2019.

Spanish actress Barbara Lennie will accept the Precious Gem Award before the screening of her latest film, “Petra.” Cinematographer Diego Garcia, who shot Paul Dano’s directing debut “Wildlife,” will receive the Art of Light award before the Florida premiere of the film.

Films screening in the Spotlight Stage section are “El Angel,” “Animal,” “Ben is Back,” “Border,” “Burning,” “Capernaum,” “Cold War,” “Everybody Knows” and “Petra.”

The Discovery Stage section will screen “Boys Cry,” “Diamantino,” “Dry Martina,” “The Heiresses,” “Hopelessly Devout,” “Soufra,” “Wildlife” and “Woman at War.
See full article at Variety »

Cannes’ Critics Week Winner ‘Diamantino’ Nabbed for U.S. by Kino Lorber (Exclusive)

  • Variety
Kino Lorber has acquired U.S. rights to Cannes Critics’ Week winner “Diamantino,” Gabriel Abrantes and Daniel Schmidt’s comic fantasy film.

The Portuguese-American duo’s feature debut will have its North American premiere at Toronto, where it has been selected to close the Midnight Madness genre section. “Diamantino” will go on to have its U.S. premiere at the New York Film Festival, where it will kick off the Projections section.

Sold by French sales company Charades, the Franco-Brazilian-Portuguese comedy drama follows a disgraced soccer star aspiring to give his life a new purpose, who becomes exploited by many people, including a nationalistic party eager to use him as its mascot. Through his frenzied journey, the reconverted soccer star is confronted with neo-fascism, the refugee crisis, genetic modification, abuse from his evil twin sisters, and a deranged hunt for the source of genius.

Variety‘s Guy Lodge described the
See full article at Variety »

Sarajevo’s Kinoscope Sidebar Focuses on the Bold and Experimental

  • Variety
Sarajevo’s Kinoscope Sidebar Focuses on the Bold and Experimental
Since its launch in 2012, the Sarajevo Film Festival’s Kinoscope sidebar has presented challenging, experimental and genre-bending titles from around the globe.

This year’s lineup includes an eclectic showcase of feature and documentary works from mostly young directors, half of them women, including Nicolas Pesce’s U.S. thriller “Piercing”; Dominga Sotomayor’s “Too Late to Die Young”; Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani’s “Let the Corpses Tan”; and Gustav Möller’s Danish thriller “The Guilty,” this year’s opening film.

Kinoscope programmers Alessandro Raja and Mathilde Henrot sat down with Variety to discuss the section and this year’s lineup.

Q: Half of your films are by female filmmakers. Is there a conscious effort on your part to present works by women?

Henrot: It’s a conscious selection which doesn’t require too much effort. Since the beginning of Kinoscope we’ve always chosen to have a balanced
See full article at Variety »
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